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The White House
White House
National Security Council (NSC) is the principal forum used by the President of the United States
President of the United States
for consideration of national security, military matters, and foreign policy matters with senior national security advisors and Cabinet officials and is part of the executive office of the president of the United States. Since its inception under Harry S. Truman, the function of the Council has been to advise and assist the president on national security and foreign policies. The Council also serves as the president's principal arm for coordinating these policies among various government agencies. The Council has counterparts in the national security councils of many other nations.

Contents

1 History

1.1 Detailed history

2 Authority and powers

2.1 Kill authorizations

3 Membership

3.1 Principals Committee 3.2 Deputies Committee 3.3 Policy Coordination Committees

4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External links

History[edit] Main article: History of the United States National Security Council The predecessor to the National Security Council was the National Intelligence Authority (NIA) which was established by President Harry S. Truman's Executive Letter of 22 January 1946 to oversee the Central Intelligence Group, the CIA's predecessor. The NIA was composed of the Secretary of State, Secretary of War, Secretary of the Navy, and the Chief of Staff to the Commander in Chief. The National Security Council was created in 1947 by the National Security Act. It was created because policymakers felt that the diplomacy of the State Department was no longer adequate to contain the USSR in light of the tension between the Soviet Union and the United States.[1] The intent was to ensure coordination and concurrence among the Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force and other instruments of national security policy such as the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), also created in the National Security Act. In 2004, the position of Director of National Intelligence
Director of National Intelligence
(DNI) was created, taking over the responsibilities previously held by the head of CIA, the Director of Central Intelligence, as a cabinet-level position to oversee and coordinate activities of the Intelligence Community.[2] On May 26, 2009, President Barack Obama
Barack Obama
merged the White House
White House
staff supporting the Homeland Security Council
Homeland Security Council
(HSC) and the National Security Council into one National Security Staff (NSS). The HSC and NSC each continue to exist by statute as bodies supporting the President.[3] The name of the staff organization was changed back to National Security Council Staff in 2014.[4] On January 29, 2017, President Donald Trump
Donald Trump
restructured the Principals Committee (a subset of the full National Security Council), while at the same time altering the attendance of the Chairman
Chairman
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
Joint Chiefs of Staff
and Director of National Intelligence.[5] On April 5, 2017, President Trump removed Steve Bannon from the Security Council.[6] According to a National Security Presidential Memorandum 2, the Chairman
Chairman
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
Joint Chiefs of Staff
and Director of National Intelligence were to sit on the Principals Committee as and when matters pertaining to them arise, but will remain part of the full National Security Council.[7][8] However, Chief of Staff Reince Priebus clarified the next day that they still are invited to attend meetings.[9] With National Security Presidential Memorandum 4 in April 2017, the Director of National Intelligence
Director of National Intelligence
and the Chairman
Chairman
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
Joint Chiefs of Staff
“shall” attend Principals Committee meetings and included the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency
Central Intelligence Agency
as a regular attendee.[10] The reorganization also placed the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development
United States Agency for International Development
as a permanent member of the Deputies Committee, winning moderate praise.[11] As of 6 April 2017, the White House
White House
Chief Strategist has been removed from the National Security Council and the roles of the director of national intelligence, CIA director and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff have been restored to the Principal's Committee.[12] Detailed history[edit] For a detailed history of the United States National Security Council by year see:

1947–1953 1953–1961 1961–1963 1963–1969 1969–1974 1974–1977 1977–1981 1981–1989 1989–1993 1993–present

Authority and powers[edit] The National Security Council was established by the National Security Act of 1947 (PL 235 – 61 Stat. 496; U.S.C. 402), amended by the National Security Act Amendments of 1949 (63 Stat. 579; 50 U.S.C. 401 et seq.). Later in 1949, as part of the Reorganization Plan, the Council was placed in the Executive Office of the President. The High Value Detainee Interrogation Group also reports to the NSC.[13] Kill authorizations[edit] Main article: Disposition Matrix A secret National Security Council panel pursues the killing of an individual, including American citizens, who has been called a suspected terrorist.[14] In this case, no public record of this decision or any operation to kill the suspect will be made available.[14] The panel's actions are justified by "two principal legal theories": They "were permitted by Congress when it authorized the use of military forces against militants in the wake of the attacks of September 11, 2001; and they are permitted under international law if a country is defending itself."[14] National Security Advisor Susan Rice, who has helped codify targeted killing criteria by creating the Disposition Matrix
Disposition Matrix
database, has described the Obama Administration
Obama Administration
targeted killing policy by stating that "in order to ensure that our counterterrorism operations involving the use of lethal force are legal, ethical, and wise, President Obama has demanded that we hold ourselves to the highest possible standards and processes".[15] Reuters
Reuters
has reported that Anwar al-Awlaki, an American citizen, was on such a kill list and was killed accordingly.[14] On February 4, 2013, NBC published a leaked Department of Justice memo providing a summary of the rationale used to justify targeted killing of US citizens who are senior operational leaders of Al-Qa'ida or associated forces.[16] Membership[edit] The Trump Administration's National Security Council, as per the statute[17], and National Security Presidential Memorandum–4 is chaired by the President. Its members are the Vice President (statutory), the Secretary of State (statutory), the Secretary of Defense (statutory), the Secretary of Energy (statutory), the National Security Advisor (non-statutory), the Attorney General (non-statutory), the Secretary of Homeland Security (non-statutory), the Representative of the United States to the United Nations (non-statutory), and the Secretary of the Treasury (statutory).[18][19] The Chairman
Chairman
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
Joint Chiefs of Staff
is the statutory military advisor to the Council, the Director of National Intelligence
Director of National Intelligence
is the statutory intelligence advisor, and the Director of National Drug Control Policy is the statutory drug control policy advisor. The Chief of Staff to the President, White House
White House
Counsel, and the Assistant to the President for Economic Policy are also regularly invited to attend NSC meetings. The Attorney General, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget and The Director of the Central Intelligence Agency are invited to attend meetings pertaining to their responsibilities. The heads of other executive departments and agencies, as well as other senior officials, are invited to attend meetings of the NSC when appropriate.

Structure of the United States National Security Council[20]

Chairman President

Statutory Attendees[21] Vice President Secretary of State Secretary of Defense Secretary of Energy

Military Advisor (and regular attendee) Chairman
Chairman
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff[22]

Intelligence Advisor (and regular attendee) Director of National Intelligence[22]

Drug Policy Advisor Director of National Drug Control Policy

Regular Attendees National Security Advisor Deputy National Security Advisor Homeland Security Advisor Attorney General White House
White House
Chief of Staff

Additional Participants Secretary of the Treasury Secretary of Homeland Security White House
White House
Counsel Director of the Central Intelligence Agency Assistant to the President for Economic Policy Ambassador to the United Nations Director of Office of Management and Budget Deputy Counsel to the President for National Security Affairs[22]

Principals Committee[edit] The Principals Committee of the National Security Council is the Cabinet-level senior interagency forum consideration of national security policy issues. The Principals Committee is convened and chaired by the National Security Advisor. The regular attendees of the Principals Committee are the Secretary of State, the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of Defense, the Attorney General, the Secretary of Energy, the Secretary of Homeland Security, the White House Chief of Staff, the Director of National Intelligence, the Chairman
Chairman
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, the Homeland Security Advisor, and the United States Ambassador to the United Nations.[10] The White House
White House
Counsel, the Deputy Counsel to the President for National Security Affairs, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget, the Deputy National Security Advisor, the Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategy, the National Security Advisor to the Vice President, and the NSC Executive Secretary may also attend all meetings of the Principals Committee. When considering international economic issues, the Principals Committee's regular attendees will include the Secretary of Commerce, the United States Trade Representative, and the Assistant to the President for Economic Policy.[23] Deputies Committee[edit] The National Security Council Deputies Committee is the senior sub-Cabinet interagency forum for consideration of national security policy issues. The Deputies Committee is also responsible for reviewing and monitoring the interagency national security process including for establishing and directing the Policy Coordination Committees.[24] The Deputies Committee is convened and chaired by the Deputy National Security Advisor or the Deputy Homeland Security Advisor.[23] Regular members of the Deputies Committee are the Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategy, the Deputy Secretary of State, Deputy Secretary of the Treasury, the Deputy Secretary of Defense, the Deputy Attorney General, the Deputy Secretary of Energy, the Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security, the Deputy Director of the Office of Management and Budget, the Deputy Director of National Intelligence, the Vice Chairman
Chairman
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the National Security Advisor to the Vice President, the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, and the Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency. Invitations to participant in or attend specific meetings are extended to Deputy or Under Secretary level of executive departments and agencies and to other senior officials when relevant issues are discussed. The Executive Secretary and the Deputy White House Counsel also attend. The relevant Senior Director on the National Security Council staff is also invited to attend when relevant.[23] Policy Coordination Committees[edit] The Policy Coordination Committees of the National Security Council, established and directed by the Deputies Committee, are responsible for the management of the development and implementation of national security policies through interagency coordination. Policy Coordination Committees are the main day-to-day fora for interagency coordination of national security policy development, implementation and analysis in aide of the Deputies Committee and the Principals Committee. Policy Coordination Committees are chaired by Senior Directors on the National Security Council staff, or sometimes National Economic Council staff, with Assistant Secretary-level officials from the relevant executive department or agency acting as co-chairs.[23] See also[edit]

United States portal

Title 32 of the Code of Federal Regulations National Coordinator for Security, Infrastructure Protection and Counter-Terrorism National Security Medal National Security Advisor Iran–Contra affair Targeted killing Tower Commission Homeland Security Council Homeland Security Advisor

References[edit]

^ Encyclopedia of American foreign policy, 2nd ed. Vol. 2, New York: Scribner, 2002, National Security Council, 22 April 2009 ^ Directors of Central Intelligence as Leaders of the US Intelligence Community, Douglas F. Garthoff, 2007, cia.gov ^ Helene Cooper (May 26, 2009). "In Security Shuffle, White House Merges Staffs". The New York Times. Retrieved March 15, 2017.  ^ Caitlin Hayden (February 10, 2014). "NSC Staff, the Name Is Back! So Long, NSS" (Press release). WhiteHouse.gov. Retrieved March 15, 2017.  ^ Merrit Kennedy (January 29, 2017). "With National Security Council Shakeup, Steve Bannon Gets A Seat At The Table". NPR. Retrieved January 29, 2017.  ^ Jennifer Jacobs (April 5, 2017). "Bannon Loses National Security Council Role in Trump Shakeup". Bloomberg. Retrieved April 5, 2017.  ^ "Presidential Memorandum Organization of the National Security Council and the Homeland Security Council" (Press release). Office of the Press Secretary. January 31, 2017. Retrieved January 31, 2017.  ^ Jim Garamone (January 31, 2017). "No Change to Chairman's Status as Senior Military Adviser, Officials Say". United States Department of Defense. Retrieved January 31, 2017.  ^ Alan Yuhas (January 29, 2017). "Trump chief of staff: defense officials not off NSC after Bannon move". The Guardian. Retrieved January 30, 2017.  ^ a b [1] Lawfare Blog NSPM-4: “Organization of the National Security Council, the Homeland Security Council, and Subcommittees”: A Summary ^ Scott Morris (February 7, 2017). "Maybe the Trump Administration Just Elevated Development Policy, or Maybe Not". Center for Global Development. Retrieved March 15, 2017.  ^ BBC (April 6, 2017). "Steve Bannon loses National Security Council seat". BBC News. Retrieved April 6, 2017.  ^ Ed Barnes (May 12, 2010). "Elite High Value Interrogation Unit Is Taking Its First Painful Steps". Fox News Channel. Retrieved March 15, 2017.  ^ a b c d Mark Hosenball (October 5, 2011). "Secret panel can put Americans on "kill list"". Reuters. Retrieved March 26, 2017.  ^ John O. Brennan
John O. Brennan
(April 30, 2012). The Efficacy and Ethics of U.S. Counterterrorism Strategy (Speech). Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Retrieved March 26, 2017.  ^ Lawfulness of a Lethal Operation Directed Against a U.S. Citizen Who Is a Senior Operational Leader of Al-Qa'ida or An Associated Force (PDF) (Report). United States Department of Justice.  ^ "50 U.S. Code § 3021 - National Security Council". LII / Legal Information Institute. Retrieved 2018-01-15.  ^ "National Security Presidential Memorandum–4 of April 4, 2017" (PDF).  ^ "50 U.S. Code § 3021 - National Security Council". LII / Legal Information Institute. Retrieved 2018-01-15.  ^ "Organization of the National Security Council System" (PDF). February 13, 2009.  ^ "National Security Council". WhiteHouse.gov. Retrieved March 15, 2017.  ^ a b c Office of the Press Secretary (January 28, 2017). "Organization of the National Security Council and the Homeland Security Council" (PDF) (Press release). White House
White House
Office. Retrieved March 15, 2017.  ^ a b c d [2] Federal Register
Federal Register
National Security Presidential Memorandum (NSPM-4) ^ [3] White House
White House
Office of the Press Secretary Presidential Memorandum Organization of the National Security Council and the Homeland Security Council

Further reading[edit]

Ivo H. Daalder
Ivo H. Daalder
and I.M. Destler, In the Shadow of the Oval Office: Profiles of the National Security Advisers and the Presidents They Served—From JFK to George W. Bush Simon & Schuster; 2009, ISBN 978-1-4165-5319-9. Karl F. Inderfurth and Loch K. Johnson, eds. Fateful Decisions: Inside the National Security Council. Oxford University Press, 2004. ISBN 978-0-19-515966-0. James Peck (2006). Washington's China: The National Security World, the Cold War, and the Origins of Globalism. Amherst, MA: University of Massachusetts Press.  David J. Rothkopf, Running The World: the Inside Story of the National Security Council and the Architects of American Power, PublicAffairs; 2006, ISBN 978-1-58648-423-1. Journey to the Center of the World: U.S. National Security Council – Arzın Merkezine Seyahat: ABD Ulusal Güvenlik Konseyi – Article on US NSC in Turkish Cody M. Brown, The National Security Council: A Legal History of the President's Most Powerful Advisers, Project on National Security Reform (2008). M. Kent Bolton, U.S. National Security and Foreign Policymaking after 9/11: Present at the Re-Creation, Rowman & Littlefield; 2007, ISBN 978-0-7425-4847-3.

Story on the NSC in Foreign Policy journal. Annual Report To Congress On White House
White House
Office Staff; Executive Office of the President, Wednesday, July 1, 2009

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to National Security Council.

Official National Security Council website History of the NSC from the White House
White House
at the Wayback Machine (archived March 12, 2008) Records of the National Security Council (NSC) in the National Archives White House
White House
Office, National Security Council Staff Papers, 1948–1961, Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library Homeland Security Watch (www.HLSwatch.com) provides current details on the NSC as it pertains to homeland security. Works by United States National Security Council
United States National Security Council
at Project Gutenberg Works by or about United States National Security Council
United States National Security Council
at Internet Archive

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