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Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
is a philosophical movement that developed in the late 1820s and 1830s in the eastern United States.[1][2][3] It arose as a reaction to protest against the general state of intellectualism and spirituality at the time.[4] The doctrine of the Unitarian church as taught at Harvard Divinity School
Harvard Divinity School
was of particular interest. Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
emerged from "English and German Romanticism, the Biblical criticism of Johann Gottfried Herder
Johann Gottfried Herder
and Friedrich Schleiermacher, the skepticism of David Hume",[1] and the transcendental philosophy of Immanuel Kant
Immanuel Kant
and German Idealism. Miller and Versluis regard Emanuel Swedenborg
Emanuel Swedenborg
as a pervasive influence on transcendentalism.[5][6] It was also strongly influenced by Hindu texts on philosophy of the mind and spirituality, especially the Upanishads. A core belief of transcendentalism is in the inherent goodness of people and nature. Adherents believe that society and its institutions have corrupted the purity of the individual, and they have faith that people are at their best when truly "self-reliant" and independent. Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
emphasizes subjective intuition over objective empiricism. Adherents believe that individuals are capable of generating completely original insights with little attention and deference to past masters.

Contents

1 Origin 2 Transcendental Club 3 Second wave of transcendentalists 4 Beliefs

4.1 Transcendental knowledge 4.2 Individualism 4.3 Indian religions 4.4 Idealism

5 Influence on other movements 6 Major figures 7 Criticism 8 See also 9 Notes 10 References 11 Sources 12 Further reading 13 External links

Origin[edit] Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
is closely related to Unitarianism, the dominant religious movement in Boston
Boston
in the early nineteenth century. It started to develop after Unitarianism
Unitarianism
took hold at Harvard University, following the elections of Henry Ware as the Hollis Professor of Divinity
Divinity
in 1805 and of John Thornton Kirkland
John Thornton Kirkland
as President in 1810. Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
was not a rejection of Unitarianism; rather, it developed as an organic consequence of the Unitarian emphasis on free conscience and the value of intellectual reason. The transcendentalists were not content with the sobriety, mildness, and calm rationalism of Unitarianism. Instead, they longed for a more intense spiritual experience. Thus, transcendentalism was not born as a counter-movement to Unitarianism, but as a parallel movement to the very ideas introduced by the Unitarians.[7] Transcendental Club[edit]

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
became a coherent movement and a sacred organization with the founding of the Transcendental Club in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on September 8, 1836 by prominent New England intellectuals, including George Putnam (1807–78, the Unitarian minister in Roxbury),[8] Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Frederic Henry Hedge. From 1840, the group frequently published in their journal The Dial, along with other venues. Second wave of transcendentalists[edit] By the late 1840s, Emerson believed that the movement was dying out, and even more so after the death of Margaret Fuller
Margaret Fuller
in 1850. "All that can be said," Emerson wrote, "is that she represents an interesting hour and group in American cultivation."[9] There was, however, a second wave of transcendentalists, including Moncure Conway, Octavius Brooks Frothingham, Samuel Longfellow
Samuel Longfellow
and Franklin Benjamin Sanborn.[10] Notably, the transgression of the spirit, most often evoked by the poet's prosaic voice, is said to endow in the reader a sense of purposefulness. This is the underlying theme in the majority of transcendentalist essays and papers—all of which are centered on subjects which assert a love for individual expression.[11] Though the group was mostly made up of struggling aesthetes, the wealthiest among them was Samuel Gray Ward, who, after a few contributions to The Dial, focused on his banking career.[12] Beliefs[edit] Transcendentalists are strong believers in the power of the individual. It focuses primarily on personal freedom. Their beliefs are closely linked with those of the Romantics, but differ by an attempt to embrace or, at least, to not oppose the empiricism of science. Transcendental knowledge[edit] Transcendentalists desire to ground their religion and philosophy in principles based upon the German Romanticism
Romanticism
of Herder and Schleiermacher. Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
merged "English and German Romanticism, the Biblical criticism of Herder and Schleiermacher, and the skepticism of Hume",[1] and the transcendental philosophy of Immanuel Kant
Immanuel Kant
(and of German Idealism
German Idealism
more generally), interpreting Kant's a priori categories as a priori knowledge. Early transcendentalists were largely unacquainted with German philosophy
German philosophy
in the original and relied primarily on the writings of Thomas Carlyle, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Victor Cousin, Germaine de Staël, and other English and French commentators for their knowledge of it. The transcendental movement can be described as an American outgrowth of English Romanticism. Individualism[edit] Transcendentalists believe that society and its institutions—particularly organized religion and political parties—corrupt the purity of the individual. They have faith that people are at their best when truly "self-reliant" and independent. It is only from such real individuals that true community can form. Even with this necessary individuality, transcendentalists also believe that all people are outlets for the "Over-soul." Because the Over-soul is one, this unites all people as one being.[13][need quotation to verify] Emerson alludes to this concept in the introduction of the American Scholar address, "that there is One Man, - present to all particular men only partially, or through one faculty; and that you must take the whole society to find the whole man."[14] Such an ideal is in harmony with Transcendentalist individualism, as each person is empowered to behold within him or herself a piece of the divine Over-soul. Indian religions[edit] Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
has been directly influenced by Indian religions.[15][16][note 1] Thoreau in Walden
Walden
spoke of the Transcendentalists' debt to Indian religions
Indian religions
directly:

Henry David Thoreau

In the morning I bathe my intellect in the stupendous and cosmogonal philosophy of the Bhagavat Geeta, since whose composition years of the gods have elapsed, and in comparison with which our modern world and its literature seem puny and trivial; and I doubt if that philosophy is not to be referred to a previous state of existence, so remote is its sublimity from our conceptions. I lay down the book and go to my well for water, and lo! there I meet the servant of the Brahmin, priest of Brahma, and Vishnu and Indra, who still sits in his temple on the Ganges reading the Vedas, or dwells at the root of a tree with his crust and water-jug. I meet his servant come to draw water for his master, and our buckets as it were grate together in the same well. The pure Walden
Walden
water is mingled with the sacred water of the Ganges.[17]

In 1844, the first English translation of the Lotus Sutra
Lotus Sutra
was included in The Dial, a publication of the New England
New England
Transcendentalists, translated from French by Elizabeth Palmer Peabody.[18] [19] Idealism[edit] Transcendentalists differ in their interpretations of the practical aims of will. Some adherents link it with utopian social change; Brownson, for example, connected it with early socialism, but others consider it an exclusively individualist and idealist project. Emerson believed the latter; in his 1842 lecture "The Transcendentalist", he suggested that the goal of a purely transcendental outlook on life was impossible to attain in practice:

You will see by this sketch that there is no such thing as a transcendental party; that there is no pure transcendentalist; that we know of no one but prophets and heralds of such a philosophy; that all who by strong bias of nature have leaned to the spiritual side in doctrine, have stopped short of their goal. We have had many harbingers and forerunners; but of a purely spiritual life, history has afforded no example. I mean, we have yet no man who has leaned entirely on his character, and eaten angels' food; who, trusting to his sentiments, found life made of miracles; who, working for universal aims, found himself fed, he knew not how; clothed, sheltered, and weaponed, he knew not how, and yet it was done by his own hands. ...Shall we say, then, that transcendentalism is the Saturnalia
Saturnalia
or excess of Faith; the presentiment of a faith proper to man in his integrity, excessive only when his imperfect obedience hinders the satisfaction of his wish.

Influence on other movements[edit]

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Further information: History of New Thought Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
is, in many aspects, the first notable American intellectual movement. It has inspired succeeding generations of American intellectuals, as well as some literary movements.[20] Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
influenced the growing movement of "Mental Sciences" of the mid-19th century, which would later become known as the New Thought movement. New Thought
New Thought
considers Emerson its intellectual father.[21] Emma Curtis Hopkins
Emma Curtis Hopkins
"the teacher of teachers", Ernest Holmes, founder of Religious Science, the Fillmores, founders of Unity, and Malinda Cramer
Malinda Cramer
and Nona L. Brooks, the founders of Divine Science, were all greatly influenced by Transcendentalism.[22] Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
also influenced Hinduism. Ram Mohan Roy (1772–1833), the founder of the Brahmo Samaj, rejected Hindu mythology, but also the Christian trinity.[23] He found that Unitarianism
Unitarianism
came closest to true Christianity,[23] and had a strong sympathy for the Unitarians,[24] who were closely connected to the Transcendentalists.[15] Ram Mohan Roy
Ram Mohan Roy
founded a missionary committee in Calcutta, and in 1828 asked for support for missionary activities from the American Unitarians.[25] By 1829, Roy had abandoned the Unitarian Committee,[26] but after Roy's death, the Brahmo Samaj
Brahmo Samaj
kept close ties to the Unitarian Church,[27] who strived towards a rational faith, social reform, and the joining of these two in a renewed religion.[24] Its theology was called "neo-Vedanta" by Christian commentators,[28][29] and has been highly influential in the modern popular understanding of Hinduism,[30] but also of modern western spirituality, which re-imported the Unitarian influences in the disguise of the seemingly age-old Neo-Vedanta.[30][31][32] Major figures[edit]

Margaret Fuller

Major figures in the transcendentalist movement were Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, and Amos Bronson Alcott. Other prominent transcendentalists included Louisa May Alcott, Charles Timothy Brooks, Orestes Brownson, William Ellery Channing, William Henry Channing, James Freeman Clarke, Christopher Pearse Cranch, John Sullivan Dwight, Convers Francis, William Henry Furness, Frederic Henry Hedge, Sylvester Judd, Theodore Parker, Elizabeth Palmer Peabody, George Ripley, Thomas Treadwell Stone, Jones Very, and Walt Whitman.[33] Criticism[edit] Early in the movement's history, the term "Transcendentalists" was used as a pejorative term by critics, who were suggesting their position was beyond sanity and reason.[34] Nathaniel Hawthorne
Nathaniel Hawthorne
wrote a novel, The Blithedale Romance (1852), satirizing the movement, and based it on his experiences at Brook Farm, a short-lived utopian community founded on transcendental principles.[35] Edgar Allan Poe
Edgar Allan Poe
wrote a story, "Never Bet the Devil Your Head" (1841), in which he embedded elements of deep dislike for transcendentalism, calling its followers "Frogpondians" after the pond on Boston Common.[36] The narrator ridiculed their writings by calling them "metaphor-run" lapsing into "mysticism for mysticism's sake",[37] and called it a "disease." The story specifically mentions the movement and its flagship journal The Dial, though Poe denied that he had any specific targets.[38] In Poe's essay "The Philosophy
Philosophy
of Composition" (1846), he offers criticism denouncing "the excess of the suggested meaning... which turns into prose (and that of the very flattest kind) the so-called poetry of the so-called transcendentalists."[39] See also[edit]

Dark romanticism Self-transcendence Transcendence (religion)

Notes[edit]

^ Versluis: "In American Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
and Asian religions, I detailed the immense impact that the Euro-American discovery of Asian religions had not only on European Romanticism, but above all, on American Transcendentalism. There I argued that the Transcendentalists' discovery of the Bhagavad-Gita, the Vedas, the Upanishads, and other world scriptures was critical in the entire movement, pivotal not only for the well-known figures like Emerson and Thoreau, but also for lesser known figures like Samuel Johnson and William Rounsville Alger. That Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
emerged out of this new knowledge of the world's religious traditions I have no doubt."[16]

References[edit]

^ a b c Goodman, Russell (2015). "Transcendentalism". Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.  " Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
is an American literary, political, and philosophical movement of the early nineteenth century, centered around Ralph Waldo Emerson." ^ Wayne, Tiffany K., ed. (2006). Encyclopedia of Transcendentalism. Facts On File's Literary Movements.  ^ "Transcendentalism". Merriam Webster. 2016. "a philosophy which says that thought and spiritual things are more real than ordinary human experience and material things" ^ Finseth, Ian. "American Transcendentalism". Excerpted from "Liquid Fire Within Me": Language, Self and Society in Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
and Early Evangelicalism, 1820-1860, - M.A. Thesis, 1995. Archived from the original on 16 April 2013. Retrieved 18 April 2013.  ^ Miller 1950, p. 49. ^ Versluis 2001, p. 17. ^ Finseth, Ian Frederick. "The Emergence of Transcendentalism". American Studies @ The University of Virginia. The University of Virginia. Retrieved 9 November 2014.  ^ "George Putnam", Heralds, Harvard Square Library, archived from the original on March 5, 2013  ^ Rose, Anne C (1981), Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
as a Social Movement, 1830–1850, New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, p. 208, ISBN 0-300-02587-4 . ^ Gura, Philip F (2007), American Transcendentalism: A History, New York: Hill and Wang, p. 8, ISBN 0-8090-3477-8 . ^ Stevenson, Martin K. "Empirical Analysis of the American Transcendental movement". New York, NY: Penguin, 2012:303. ^ Wayne, Tiffany. Encyclopedia of Transcendentalism: The Essential Guide to the Lives and Works of Transcendentalist Writers. New York: Facts on File, 2006: 308. ISBN 0-8160-5626-9 ^ Emerson, Ralph Waldo. "The Over-Soul". American Transcendentalism Web. Retrieved 13 July 2015.  ^ "EMERSON--"THE AMERICAN SCHOLAR"". transcendentalism-legacy.tamu.edu. Retrieved 2017-10-14.  ^ a b Versluis 1993. ^ a b Versluis 2001, p. 3. ^ Thoreau, Henry David. Walden. Boston: Ticknor&Fields, 1854.p.279. Print. ^ Lopez Jr., Donald S. (2016). "The Life of the Lotus Sutra". Tricycle Magazine (Winter).  ^ "The Preaching of Buddha". The Dial. 4: 391. 1844.  ^ Coviello, Peter. "Transcendentalism" The Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature. Oxford University Press, 2004. Oxford Reference Online. Web. 23 Oct. 2011 ^ "New Thought", MSN Encarta, Microsoft, archived from the original on 2009-11-01, retrieved Nov 16, 2007 . ^ INTA New Thought
New Thought
History Chart, Websyte, archived from the original on 2000-08-24 . ^ a b Harris 2009, p. 268. ^ a b Kipf 1979, p. 3. ^ Kipf 1979, p. 7-8. ^ Kipf 1979, p. 15. ^ Harris 2009, p. 268-269. ^ Halbfass 1995, p. 9. ^ Rinehart 2004, p. 192. ^ a b King 2002. ^ Sharf 1995. ^ Sharf 2000. ^ Gura, Philip F. American Transcendentalism: A History. New York: Hill and Wang, 2007: 7–8. ISBN 0-8090-3477-8 ^ Loving, Jerome (1999), Walt Whitman: The Song of Himself, University of California Press, p. 185, ISBN 0-520-22687-9 . ^ McFarland, Philip (2004), Hawthorne in Concord, New York: Grove Press, p. 149, ISBN 0-8021-1776-7 . ^ Royot, Daniel (2002), "Poe's humor", in Hayes, Kevin J, The Cambridge Companion to Edgar Allan Poe, Cambridge University Press, pp. 61–2, ISBN 0-521-79727-6 . ^ Ljunquist, Kent (2002), "The poet as critic", in Hayes, Kevin J, The Cambridge Companion to Edgar Allan Poe, Cambridge University Press, p. 15, ISBN 0-521-79727-6  ^ Sova, Dawn B (2001), Edgar Allan Poe: A to Z, New York: Checkmark Books, p. 170, ISBN 0-8160-4161-X . ^ Baym, Nina; et al., eds. (2007), The Norton Anthology of American Literature, B (6th ed.), New York: Norton .

Sources[edit]

Harris, Mark W. (2009), The A to Z of Unitarian Universalism, Scarecrow Press  King, Richard (2002), Orientalism
Orientalism
and Religion: Post-Colonial Theory, India and "The Mystic East", Routledge  Kipf, David (1979), The Brahmo Samaj
Brahmo Samaj
and the shaping of the modern Indian mind, Atlantic Publishers & Distri  Miller, Perry, ed. (1950). The Transcendentalists: An Anthology. Harvard University Press. ISBN 9780674903333. CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link) Rinehart, Robin (2004), Contemporary Hinduism: ritual, culture, and practice, ABC-CLIO  Sharf, Robert H. (1995), "Buddhist Modernism
Modernism
and the Rhetoric of Meditative Experience" (PDF), Numen, 42  Sharf, Robert H. (2000), "The Rhetoric of Experience and the Study of Religion" (PDF), Journal of Consciousness Studies, 7 (11-12): 267–87  Versluis, Arthur (1993), American Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
and Asian Religions, Oxford University Press  Versluis, Arthur (2001), The Esoteric Origins of the American Renaissance, Oxford University Press 

Further reading[edit]

Dillard, Daniel, “The American Transcendentalists: A Religious Historiography,” 49th Parallel (Birmingham, England), 28 (Spring 2012), online Gura, Philip F. American Transcendentalism: A History (2007) Harrison, C. G. The Transcendental Universe, six lectures delivered before the Berean Society (London, 1894) 1993 edition ISBN 0 940262 58 4 (US), 0 904693 44 9 (UK) Rose, Anne C. Social Movement, 1830–1850 (Yale University Press, 1981) Versluis, Arthur (2001), The Esoteric Origins of the American Renaissance, Oxford University Press 

External links[edit]

Look up transcendentalism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Wikisource
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has the text of a 1920 Encyclopedia Americana
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article about Transcendentalism.

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"American Transcendentalism". Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.  "Transcendentalism", Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Stanford 

Other

Ian Frederick Finseth (1995), Liquid Fire Within Me: Language, Self and Society in Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism
and early Evangelicalism, 1820-1860, M.A. Thesis in English, University of Virginia

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