HOME
ListMoto - The Holocaust In Luxembourg


--- Advertisement ---



The Holocaust
The Holocaust
in Luxembourg
Luxembourg
refers to the persecution and near-annihilation of the 3,500-strong Jewish population of Luxembourg begun shortly after the start of the German occupation during World War II, when the country was officially incorporated into Nazi Germany. The persecution lasted until October 1941, when the Germans declared the territory to be free of Jews who had been deported to extermination camps and ghettos in Eastern Europe.

Contents

1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External links

History[edit] Before the war, Luxembourg
Luxembourg
had a population of about 3,500 Jews, many of them newly arrived in the country to escape persecution in Germany.[1] The Nuremberg Laws, which had applied in Germany since 1935, were enforced in Luxembourg
Luxembourg
from September 1940 and Jews were encouraged to leave the country for Vichy France.[1] Emigration was forbidden in October 1941, but not before nearly 2,500 had fled.[1] In practice they were little better off in Vichy France, and many of those who left were later deported and killed. From September 1941, all Jews in Luxembourg
Luxembourg
were forced to wear the yellow Star of David badge to identify them.[2] From October 1941, Nazi authorities began to deport the around 800 remaining Jews from Luxembourg
Luxembourg
to Łódź Ghetto
Łódź Ghetto
and the concentration camps at Theresienstadt and Auschwitz.[1] Around 700 were deported from the Transit Camp at Fuenfbrunnen in Ulflingen in the north of Luxembourg.[1] Luxembourg
Luxembourg
was declared "Judenfrei" ("cleansed of Jews") except for those in hiding[2] on 19 October 1941.[3] Of the original Jewish population of Luxembourg, only 36 are known to have survived the war.[1] See also[edit]

Luxembourg
Luxembourg
portal World War II
World War II
portal

The Holocaust Luxembourg
Luxembourg
in World War II Luxembourgish Resistance

References[edit]

^ a b c d e f "Luxembourg". United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Retrieved 11 May 2013.  ^ a b "The Destruction of the Jews of Luxembourg". Holocaust Education and Archive Research Team. Retrieved 11 May 2013.  ^ "Commémoration de la Shoah au Luxembourg". Government.lu. 3 July 2005. Retrieved 11 May 2013. 

Further reading[edit]

Artuso, Vincent (October 2012). "Des excuses, mais au nom de qui? L'administration luxembourgeoise et la Shoah". Forum (322): 9–11.  Cerf, Paul. L'étoile juive au Luxembourg. Luxembourg: Editions RTL, 1986. Clesse, René (1991). "Die Natur is gnädiger als die Menschen". Ons Stad. 36: 22–25.  Clesse, René (2002). "Shoah in Luxemburg". Ons Stad. 71: 18–19.  Hoffmann, Serge (1996). "Luxemburg - Asyl und Gastfreundschaft in einem kleinen Land". In Benz, Wolfgang; Wetzel, Juliane. Solidarität und Hilfe für Juden während der NS-Zeit. Regionalstudien I: Polen, Rumänien, Griechenland, Luxemburg, Norwegen, Schweiz. Berlin: Metropol-Verl. pp. 187–204. ISBN 9783926893437. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to The Holocaust
The Holocaust
in Luxembourg.

Luxembourg
Luxembourg
at United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
(USHMM) Luxembourg
Luxembourg
at European Holocaust Research Infrastructure (EHRI) Memoshoah.lu at MemoShoah association

v t e

The Holocaust

By territory

Albania Belarus Belgium Channel Islands Croatia Estonia France Norway Latvia Libya Lithuania Luxembourg Poland Russia Serbia Ukraine

Lists and timelines

Victims of Nazism Holocaust survivors Survivors of Sobibór Victims and survivors of Auschwitz

Books and other resources Films about the Holocaust Nazi concentration camps Nazi ideologues Rescuers of Jews Shtetls depopulated of Jews Timeline of deportations of French Jews Timeline of the Holocaust Timeline of the Holocaust in Norway Treblinka timeline

Camps

Concentration

Bergen-Belsen Bogdanovka Buchenwald Dachau Danica Dora Đakovo Esterwegen Flossenbürg Gonars Gospić Gross-Rosen Herzogenbusch Jadovno Janowska Kaiserwald Kraków-Płaszów Kruščica Lobor Mauthausen-Gusen Neuengamme Rab Ravensbrück Sachsenhausen Salaspils Sisak children's camp Stutthof Tenja Theresienstadt Topovske Šupe Uckermark Warsaw

Extermination

Auschwitz-Birkenau Bełżec Chełmno Jasenovac Majdanek Maly Trostenets Sajmište Slana Sobibór Treblinka

Transit

be Breendonk Mechelen fr Gurs Drancy it Bolzano Risiera di San Sabba nl Amersfoort Schoorl Westerbork

Methods

Einsatzgruppen Gas van Gas chamber Extermination through labour Human medical experimentation

Nazi units

SS-Totenkopfverbände Concentration Camps Inspectorate Politische Abteilung Sanitätswesen

Victims

Jews

Roundups

fr Izieu Marseille Vel' d'Hiv

Pogroms

Kristallnacht Bucharest Dorohoi Iaşi Jedwabne Kaunas Lviv Odessa Tykocin Wąsosz

Ghettos

Poland

Białystok Kraków Łódź Lublin Lwów Warsaw

Elsewhere

Budapest Kovno Minsk Riga Vilna

"Final Solution"

Wannsee Conference Operation Reinhard Holocaust trains Extermination camps

Einsatzgruppen

Babi Yar Bydgoszcz Kamianets-Podilskyi Ninth Fort Piaśnica Ponary Rumbula Erntefest

Resistance

Jewish partisans Ghetto uprisings

Warsaw Białystok Częstochowa

End of World War II

Death marches Wola Bricha Displaced persons Holocaust denial

trivialization

Others

Romani people (gypsies) Poles Soviet POWs Slavs in Eastern Europe Homosexuals People with disabilities Serbs Freemasons Jehovah's Witnesses Black people

Responsibility

Organizations

Nazi Party Schutzstaffel
Schutzstaffel
(SS) Reich Security Main Office (RSHA) Sicherheitsdienst
Sicherheitsdienst
(SD) Waffen-SS Wehrmacht

Units

Einsatzgruppen Police Regiments Orpo Police Battalions

Collaborators

Ypatingasis būrys Lithuanian Security Police Rollkommando Hamann Arajs Kommando Ukrainian Auxiliary Police Trawnikis Nederlandsche SS Special
Special
Brigades

Individuals

Major perpetrators Nazi ideologues

Early elements Aftermath Remembrance

Early elements

Nazi racial policy Nazi eugenics Nuremberg Laws Haavara Agreement Madagascar Plan Forced euthanasia (Action T4)

Nuremberg trials Denazification Holocaust survivors

Survivor guilt

Reparations

Remembrance

Days of remembrance Memorials an

.