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The Mozilla
Mozilla
Application Suite (originally known as Mozilla, marketed as the Mozilla
Mozilla
Suite) is a discontinued cross-platform integrated Internet
Internet
suite. Its development was initiated by Netscape Communications Corporation, before their acquisition by AOL. It was based on the source code of Netscape
Netscape
Communicator. The development was spearheaded by the Mozilla Organization
Mozilla Organization
from 1998 to 2003, and by the Mozilla Foundation
Mozilla Foundation
from 2003 to 2006. It has been superseded by SeaMonkey
SeaMonkey
Internet suite
Internet suite
( SeaMonkey
SeaMonkey
was the original code name for the project), a community-driven Internet suite
Internet suite
that is based on the same source code and continued to be developed with newer Mozilla
Mozilla
codebase. The Mozilla
Mozilla
Suite was composed of several main programs: Navigator (a Web browser), Communicator ( Mozilla
Mozilla
Mail & Newsgroups), a Web page developer ( Mozilla
Mozilla
Composer), an IRC client
IRC client
(ChatZilla) and an electronic address book. Also included were tools to synchronise the application with PalmPilot
PalmPilot
devices, and several extensions for advanced Web development including the DOM Inspector
DOM Inspector
and Venkman (a JavaScript
JavaScript
debugger). Versions 6 and 7 of the Netscape
Netscape
suite were based on the Mozilla Suite. The last official version is 1.7.13, as Mozilla Foundation
Mozilla Foundation
is currently focusing on the development of Firefox
Firefox
and Thunderbird. The Mozilla
Mozilla
Suite is available under the terms of the Mozilla
Mozilla
project's tri-license, as free and open source software.

Contents

1 History and development 2 Features

2.1 Usability and accessibility 2.2 Customizability 2.3 Standards support 2.4 Cross-platform support 2.5 Web development tools 2.6 Security

3 Market adoption and project end 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External links

History and development[edit] Main article: History of Mozilla
Mozilla
Application Suite

Startup screen of the Mozilla
Mozilla
Application Suite for Mac OS 9
Mac OS 9
featuring the Mozilla
Mozilla
mascot

In March 1998, Netscape
Netscape
released most of the code base for its popular Netscape Communicator
Netscape Communicator
suite under an open source license. The name of the application developed from this would be Mozilla, coordinated by the newly created Mozilla
Mozilla
Organization, at the mozilla.org Web site. Although large parts of the original Communicator code, including the layout engine and front-end related codes, were abandoned shortly thereafter, the Mozilla Organization
Mozilla Organization
eventually succeeded in producing a full-featured Internet suite
Internet suite
that surpassed Communicator in features, stability and degree of standards compliance. Under the AOL
AOL
banner, the Mozilla Organization
Mozilla Organization
continued development of the browser and management of the Mozilla
Mozilla
source until July 2003 when this task was passed to the Mozilla
Mozilla
Foundation. The Foundation is a non-profit organization composed primarily of developers and staff from mozilla.org and owns the Mozilla
Mozilla
trademark (but not the copyright to the source code, which is retained by the individual and corporate contributors, but licensed under the terms of the GPL and MPL). It received initial donations from AOL, IBM, Sun Microsystems, Red Hat, and Mitch Kapor. However, all official ties with AOL
AOL
were severed following the announcement of the end of the Netscape
Netscape
Navigator browser and AOL's agreement to use Microsoft's Internet
Internet
Explorer browser in future versions of its AOL
AOL
software. AOL
AOL
has since announced it will be using Mozilla's Gecko layout engine. According to the Mozilla
Mozilla
development roadmap published on April 2, 2003, the Mozilla Organization
Mozilla Organization
planned to focus development efforts on the new standalone applications: Phoenix (now known as Mozilla Firefox) and Minotaur (now known as Mozilla
Mozilla
Thunderbird). To distinguish the suite from the standalone products, the suite is marketed as " Mozilla
Mozilla
Suite" or the more lengthy " Mozilla
Mozilla
Application Suite". On March 10, 2005, the Mozilla Foundation
Mozilla Foundation
announced that they would not release any further official versions of the suite beyond 1.7.x.[2] However, the Mozilla Foundation
Mozilla Foundation
emphasized that they would provide infrastructure for community members who wished to continue development. In effect, this means that the suite will still continue to be developed, but not by the Mozilla Foundation
Mozilla Foundation
itself. To avoid confusing organizations that still want to use the Mozilla
Mozilla
Suite, it was announced that the new, community-developed product would be named "SeaMonkey", with version numbers that start at "1.0". Features[edit] Usability and accessibility[edit] Mozilla
Mozilla
supported tabbed browsing, which allows users to open multiple Web pages in the same browser window. This feature was written with the popular MultiZilla extension for Mozilla
Mozilla
as a base. Mozilla
Mozilla
also belonged in the group of browsers who early on adopted customizable pop-up blocking. The browser had a number of features which helped users find information. First, Mozilla
Mozilla
had an incremental find feature known as "find as you type". With this feature enabled, a user could simply begin typing a word while viewing a Web page, and the browser automatically searched for it and highlighted the first instance found. As the user typed more of the word, the browser refined its search. Additionally, Mozilla
Mozilla
supported the "custom keyword" feature. This feature allowed users to access their bookmarks from the location bar using keywords (and an optional query parameter). For example, using a custom keyword, a user could type "google apple" into the address bar and be redirected to the results of a Google search for "apple". For the mail and newsgroup component, the built-in Bayesian e-mail spam filter could effectively filter out unwanted e-mail spam after a period of training. Customizability[edit] Mozilla
Mozilla
introduced the extension model, which was expanded and improved by Firefox
Firefox
and Thunderbird. Through extensions (installed via XPInstall modules), users might activate new features, such as mouse gestures, advertisement blocking, proxy server switching, and debugging tools. One can view the extension system as a ground for experimentation, where one can test new functionalities. Occasionally, an extension, or a part of it, became part of the official product (for example MultiZilla's tabbed browsing feature eventually became part of the standard Mozilla). Mozilla
Mozilla
also supported a variety of themes/skins, which changed its appearance. Themes consisted of packages of CSS and image files. The Mozilla Add-ons
Mozilla Add-ons
Web site offered many themes. Beyond adding a new theme, users could customize its interface by adding and removing some of its buttons and toolbars. Additionally, Mozilla
Mozilla
stored most of its preferences in a list that users could access by typing about:config in the address bar. Some preferences were only available through it, like turning on bookmark icons. Standards support[edit] The Mozilla Foundation
Mozilla Foundation
took pride in Mozilla's compliance with existing standards, especially W3C
W3C
Web standards. Mozilla
Mozilla
had extensive support for most basic standards at the time including HTML, XML, XHTML, CSS, JavaScript, DOM, MathML, DTD, XSLT
XSLT
and XPath. Mozilla
Mozilla
also supported PNG images and variable transparency, (which Internet Explorer
Internet Explorer
only supported fully in version 7). Indeed, Internet Explorer's lack of support for PNG images has occasioned much debate, as many Web developers wanted to move away from the old GIF format, which does not have the same capabilities and image quality as PNG. Mozilla
Mozilla
had implemented most of CSS Level 2 and some of the not-yet-completed CSS Level 3 standard. It was among the first browsers to pass the original Box Acid Test, although it doesn't fully pass the more rigorous Acid2
Acid2
test for HTML, CSS, and PNG standards support. Other browsers based on newer versions of Mozilla's core technology, however, pass the Acid2
Acid2
test. The mail and newsgroup supported POP and IMAP. It also supported LDAP address completion. Both reading and writing of HTML
HTML
e-mails were supported. Mail files were stored in mbox format, and were thus portable. The first version of the suite, i.e., the one that formed the basis of Netscape
Netscape
6, did not support the blink element, thus making it the only Netscape/ Mozilla
Mozilla
browser that has not supported the notorious tag that Netscape
Netscape
itself created. Later versions of the suite supported the element as well as the marquee tag, originally created by rival Internet
Internet
Explorer. Cross-platform support[edit] Mozilla
Mozilla
ran on a wide variety of platforms. Releases available on the primary distribution site supported the following operating systems:

Various versions of Microsoft
Microsoft
Windows, including 95, 98, Me, NT 4.0, 2000, XP, Server 2003, and Vista. Mac OS X Mac OS 9
Mac OS 9
(discontinued after Mozilla
Mozilla
1.2.1, but an unofficial Mozilla 1.3.1 is available here [1]). However, an updated branch of the Suite survives for the classic Mac OS in the form of Classilla. Linux-based operating systems using X.Org Server
X.Org Server
or XFree86 OS/2, also known as Warpzilla[3]

Mozilla
Mozilla
used the same format to store users' profiles (which contain their personal browser settings) even on different operating systems, so a profile might be used on multiple platforms, as long as all of the platforms could access the profile (e.g., the profile was stored on a FAT32 partition accessible from both Windows
Windows
and Linux). This functionality was useful for users who dual-boot their machines. However, it might occasionally cause problems, especially with extensions. Web development tools[edit] Mozilla
Mozilla
came with three Web development tools — a DOM Inspector, Venkman and JavaScript
JavaScript
Console. The DOM Inspector
DOM Inspector
was not available in non- Mozilla
Mozilla
browsers, and the JavaScript
JavaScript
Console was more advanced than the consoles available in non- Mozilla
Mozilla
browsers. Venkman was a difficult to use but decent JavaScript
JavaScript
debugger. These were installed by default, though you could opt them out (except for the JavaScript
JavaScript
Console) with the other install options. Security[edit] Mozilla
Mozilla
was designed with security in mind. Among its key features were the use of the sandbox security model, same origin policy and external protocol whitelisting. One key characteristic of Mozilla
Mozilla
security was that its source code is visible to everyone. Proposed software changes were reviewed by at least one other person, and typically "super-reviewed" by yet another, and once placed in the software were visible for anyone else to consider, protest, or improve. In addition, the Mozilla Foundation
Mozilla Foundation
operated a "bug bounty" scheme: Users who reported a valid critical security bug received a US$500 cash reward for each report and a Mozilla
Mozilla
T-shirt. The purpose of this "bug bounty" system, according to the Mozilla
Mozilla
Foundation, was to "encourage more people to find and report security bugs in our products, so that we can make our products even more secure than they already are". Anyone in the world could report a bug. Also, access to the source code of Mozilla
Mozilla
Firefox, internal design documentation, forum discussions, and other materials that could be helpful in finding bugs were available to anyone. The Mozilla Foundation
Mozilla Foundation
has issued a security bugs policy to help contributors to deal with security vulnerabilities. The policy restricts access to a security-related bug report to members of the security team until after Mozilla
Mozilla
has shipped a fix for the problem. This is intended to deter the exploitation of publicly known vulnerabilities and give the developers time to issue a patch. While similar to other "responsible disclosure" policies issued by companies such as Microsoft, this policy is opposed to the full disclosure principle favored by some security researchers. As of June 2005, Secunia had reported three unpatched vulnerabilities in Mozilla
Mozilla
with the most serious one marked "less critical". Market adoption and project end[edit] Main article: Usage share of Web browsers From 1998 to 2004, the global usage share of Mozilla
Mozilla
grew from a negligible amount to about 3%. Because of the Foundation's plan to switch development focus to standalone applications such as Firefox and Thunderbird, many new features and enhancements were not available for Mozilla. This, combined with the community marketing effort named "Spread Firefox", drew more and more users away from Mozilla
Mozilla
since late 2004, when Firefox
Firefox
1.0 was released. There were no official releases of the Mozilla
Mozilla
Suite beyond version 1.7.13. As of 2008, Mozilla
Mozilla
Suite usage share was approximately 0.1%. SeaMonkey, a community-driven Internet suite
Internet suite
that is based on the same source code, is pursued by those that appreciated Mozilla's feature set.[4] See also[edit]

Free software portal

List of web browsers List of news clients List of HTML
HTML
editors List of IRC clients Comparison of web browsers Comparison of e-mail clients Comparison of HTML
HTML
editors Comparison of IRC clients

Notes[edit]

^ " Mozilla
Mozilla
1.7.13". http://www-archive.mozilla.org. 21 April 2006. Retrieved 22 August 2015.  ^ "Two discontinued browsers". LWN.net. 21 December 2005. Retrieved 19 August 2012.  ^ Watson, Dave (21 July 2001). "A Quick Look at Mozilla
Mozilla
0.9.2". The Southern California OS/2
OS/2
User Group. Retrieved 16 August 2010.  ^ " About
About
SeaMonkey". The SeaMonkey
SeaMonkey
Project. Retrieved 6 March 2016. 

References[edit]

Mozilla Foundation
Mozilla Foundation
(April 2, 2003). Mozilla
Mozilla
Development Roadmap. Retrieved June 11, 2005. Mozilla Foundation
Mozilla Foundation
(March 10, 2005). Mozilla
Mozilla
Application Suite - Transition Plan. Retrieved March 10, 2005. SeaMonkey
SeaMonkey
Council (July 2, 2005). SeaMonkey
SeaMonkey
Project Continues Internet Suite. Retrieved March 27, 2007.

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Mozilla
Mozilla
Application Suite.

Mozilla
Mozilla
Suite - The All-in-One Internet
Internet
Application Suite SeaMonkey
SeaMonkey
Internet
Internet
Suite - all-in-one Internet
Internet
application suite

v t e

Mozilla

Projects

Mozilla Labs

Bonsai Bugzilla ChatZilla Electrolysis Project Jetpack Lightning Persona Prism Raindrop Skywriter Sunbird PDF.js Sync Tinderbox Ubiquity

Mozilla Research

asm.js Daala Firefox
Firefox
OS OpenFlint Open Media Rust Servo Shumway WebAssembly WebVR

Mozilla Foundation

Firefox

1 1.5 2 3 3.5 3.6 4 5–current Future releases for Android for iOS Focus

SeaMonkey Thunderbird

Origins

Mozilla
Mozilla
Application Suite Netscape
Netscape
Navigator Netscape
Netscape
Communicator Netscape
Netscape
Communications Beonex Communicator

Forks (discontinued in italics)

Basilisk BurningDog Classilla Flock Gnuzilla Goanna Iceape IceCat Icedove Iceowl Miro Netscape
Netscape
9 Pale Moon Portable Edition FossaMail Swiftfox Swiftweasel TenFourFox Unified XUL Platform Waterfox xB Browser

Frameworks

Add-on Gecko Necko NPAPI

XPConnect

XBL XPCOM XPInstall XUL XULRunner

Components

Application Object Model Composer NSPR NSS Rhino SpiderMonkey Tamarin Venkman

Discontinued

Calendar Project Camino Firefox
Firefox
Home Grendel Minimo

Organization

Foundation

Former Mozilla
Mozilla
Organization Mozilla
Mozilla
Foundation

Subsidiaries

Mozilla
Mozilla
Corporation Mozilla
Mozilla
Messaging Mozilla
Mozilla
Online

Official affiliates

Mozilla
Mozilla
China Mozilla
Mozilla
Europe Mozilla
Mozilla
Japan Mozilla
Mozilla
Taiwan

People

Mitchell Baker David Baron Sheeri Cabral Tantek Çelik Brendan Eich John Hammink Robert O'Callahan Johnny Stenbäck Doug Turner Boris Zbarsky

Community

mozdev.org Mozilla
Mozilla
Add-ons MDN Web Docs MozillaZine Spread Firefox

Other topics

The Book of Mozilla Code Rush Mozilla
Mozilla
Public License Localizations Mascot Rebranding / forking

v t e

Email
Email
clients

Free software

Alpine Balsa Citadel/UX Classilla Claws Mail Columba Cone Elm Evolution fetchmail Geary getmail GNUMail Gnus Gnuzilla IMP KMail Mahogany Mailpile Mailx Mailx (Heirloom Project) Modest Mozilla
Mozilla
Thunderbird Mulberry Mutt nmh / MH Nylas N1 OfflineIMAP Roundcube SeaMonkey SquirrelMail Sylpheed Trojitá YAM Zimbra

Freeware

eM Client EmailTray Foxmail Inky i.Scribe Mailbird Opera Mail Spark TouchMail

Retail

Hiri Bloomba/WordPerfect Mail Newton IBM
IBM
Notes InScribe Mail (Apple) Mail (Windows) Microsoft
Microsoft
Outlook Novell GroupWise

Shareware

Becky! Eureka Email Forté Agent GyazMail Pocomail The Bat!

Donationware

Pegasus Mail

Discontinued

Arachne Beonex Communicator BlitzMail cc:Mail Claris Emailer Columbia MM Courier Cyberdog Cyberjack Embrowser Eudora FossaMail Hula Mailbox Mailody Microsoft
Microsoft
Entourage Microsoft
Microsoft
Internet
Internet
Mail and News MINUET Mozilla
Mozilla
Mail & Newsgroups Netscape
Netscape
Mail Netscape
Netscape
Messenger 9 NeXTMail Outlook Express Pine POPmail Sparrow Spicebird Turnpike WebSpyder Windows
Windows
Live Mail Windows
Windows
Mail Windows
Windows
Messaging

Related technologies

Extended SMTP LMTP IMAP POP Push-IMAP SMAP SMTP UUCP

Related topics

Email Unicode and email

Category Comparison List

v t e

Gopher

A protocol for document search and retrieval on the Internet

Active clients

Free/open-source

Arachne Classilla Conkeror ELinks Gnuzilla K-Meleon Kazehakase Line Mode Browser Lynx Mothra W3m

Proprietary

OmniWeb

Discontinued clients

Agora Amaya Arena AT&T Pogo Beonex Communicator Camino Cello Cyberjack Galeon GopherVR IBrowse Internet Explorer
Internet Explorer
for Mac libwww Minimo Minuet Mosaic Mozilla
Mozilla
Application Suite Netscape SlipKnot Songbird tkWWW UdiWWW xB Browser

Previously supported

Epiphany Firefox Flock Internet
Internet
Explorer SeaMonkey

Server software

Bucktooth NetPresenz PyGopherd Squid Synchronet

Search engines

Jughead Veronica Wide area information server (WAIS)

Content

AllMusic CCSO Nameserver Gophermap Phlog

Hosts

SDF Public Access Unix System The WELL

People

John Goerzen Mark P. McCahill

Gopher+

v t e

HTML
HTML
editors

Web design

Open-source

Aptana Arachnophilia Atom Bluefish Eclipse Emacs Komodo Edit NetBeans TextMate Visual Studio Code

CodeMirror-based

Brackets Light Table

Mozilla
Mozilla
Composer-based

BlueGriffon

Scintilla-based

FlashDevelop Geany Notepad++ Notepad2 SciTE

Web-based

Ace Aloha Editor CKEditor CodeMirror ContentTools Maqetta TinyMCE WYMeditor YUI Rich Text Editor Jodit

Freeware

FirstPage Google Web Designer HTML-Kit Visual Studio Community Visual Studio Express Mobirise openElement PSPad RJ TextEd TED Notepad TextWrangler

Commercial software

Cross-platform

Adobe Dreamweaver Adobe Muse Froala Editor Komodo IDE Macaw Oxygen XML
XML
Editor PhpStorm Sublime Text UltraEdit

macOS only

BBEdit Coda Freeway PageSpinner Sandvox Smultron

Windows
Windows
only

Codelobster CoffeeCup HTML
HTML
Editor EZGenerator EditPlus EmEditor Visual Studio Multi-Edit NetObjects Fusion NoteTab PHPEdit TextPad TopStyle Xara
Xara
Web Designer

Discontinued

AOLpress Adobe Contribute Adobe GoLive Adobe PageMill Alleycode HTML
HTML
Editor Amaya Arena Home Page ConTEXT Frame-IT! gPHPedit gwrite HoTMetaL HotDog iWeb KompoZer HomeSite Microsoft
Microsoft
Expression Web Microsoft
Microsoft
FrontPage Microsoft
Microsoft
SharePoint Designer Microsoft
Microsoft
WebMatrix Mozilla
Mozilla
Composer Netscape
Netscape
Composer Nvu Quanta Plus SeaMonkey
SeaMonkey
Composer tkWWW Nexus (WorldWideWeb)

Helper tools

CSE HTML
HTML
Validator CSSTidy FrameGang HTML
HTML
Tidy Pandoc

Category Comparison List

v t e

Internet
Internet
Relay Chat (IRC)

General topics

Common terms

BNC Bot Channel DoS attack Channel Operator Client Flood Hostmask IRC Netsplit Network Operator Script Server Services Takeover vhost

Lists and comparisons

List of IRC commands Comparison of IRC bots Comparison of IRC clients Comparison of mobile IRC clients Comparison of IRC daemons

Related protocols

IRC IRCX MSN Chat P10 CTCP DCC XDCC Ident

See also

IRC subculture Jarkko Oikarinen

Clients (comparison)

macOS

Colloquy Fire Homer (Mac OS) Ircle Linkinus MacIrssi Snak

Microsoft
Microsoft
Windows

Bersirc mIRC Microsoft
Microsoft
Comic Chat PIRCH Shareaza Visual IRC

Unix-like

ircII

Cross-platform

BitchX Irssi Konversation KVIrc LeafChat naim Smuxi WeeChat XChat PJIRC Quassel IRC IceChat

Multi-IM

Centericq Empathy Kopete Miranda IM Pidgin Trillian

Web-based

CGI:IRC PJIRC Mibbit

Web browser
Web browser
components

ChatZilla Mozilla
Mozilla
Application Suite

Library and plug-ins

ERC rcirc

Bots (comparison)

Eggdrop Infobot Robot9000

Bouncers, Gateways and Proxies

BitlBee ZNC

Daemons (comparison)

IRCd ircu UnrealIRCd

Networks

DALnet EFnet Freenode GameSurge IRC@2ch IRCnet OFTC QuakeNet Rizon RusNet SlashNET Undernet

v t e

Internet
Internet
suites

Current

AOL
AOL
Desktop Arachne Classilla Gnuzilla MSN Explorer ObjectView Otter SeaMonkey Torch

Discontinued

AOL
AOL
OpenRide Beonex Communicator Cyberdog Cyberjack Emissary Internet
Internet
Explorer

3 4 5

Minuet Mozilla Netscape

5 Communicator

Opera

version 12.17 and earlier

Titan Turnpike

Related technologies

HyperCard Gopher Email Elm Viewdata Teletext Videotex X.25 Aliweb ASCII HyperText Markup Language HyTelnet Libwww Virtual Reality Markup Language File
File
Transfer Protocol Telnet NLS NCSA Telnet UUCP Usenet ARPANET BITNET Prodigy CompuServe 3D Markup Language for Web

Related articles

Browser wars Web page World Wide Web Whole Internet
Internet
User's Guide and Catalog List of web browsers List of web browsers
List of web browsers
for Unix/Linux Comparison of web browsers Usage share of web browsers Timeline of web browsers

v t e

Timeline of web browsers

General

Comparison

lightweight

History List

for Unix

Usage share

1990s

1990

WorldWideWeb
WorldWideWeb
(Nexus)

1991

Line Mode Browser

libwww

1992

Erwise MacWWW
MacWWW
(Samba) MidasWWW tkWWW ViolaWWW

1993

AMosaic Arena Cello Emacs/W3 Lynx 2 NCSA Mosaic VMS Mosaic

1994

AirMosaic

Internet
Internet
in a Box

ANT Fresco Argo IBM
IBM
WebExplorer SlipKnot Minuet Navipress Mosaic/Mosaic Netscape/ Netscape
Netscape
Navigator Spyglass Mosaic TCP/Connect II

1995

Agora ALynx AMSD Ariadna Cyberjack eWorld Web Browser Grail Internet Explorer
Internet Explorer
1 Internet Explorer
Internet Explorer
2 Netscape Navigator
Netscape Navigator
2 NetShark OmniWeb HotJava UdiWWW WebShark

1996

Cyberdog Arachne AWeb IBrowse Amaya Internet Explorer
Internet Explorer
3 Netscape Navigator
Netscape Navigator
3 Opera 2 Oracle PowerBrowser tcpCONNECT4 Voyager

1997

Netscape
Netscape
Communicator Internet Explorer
Internet Explorer
4 Opera 2.1

1998

NeoPlanet Mozilla
Mozilla
Application Suite Opera 3–3.21

1999

iCab Internet Explorer
Internet Explorer
5 Omniweb
Omniweb
3 Opera 3.5–3.62

2000s

2000

Beonex Communicator Galeon K-Meleon MediaBrowser Netscape
Netscape
6 Opera 4–4.02

2001

iCab 2.5 Internet Explorer
Internet Explorer
6 Omniweb
Omniweb
4 Opera 5–5.12

2002

Avant Browser
Avant Browser
7 Camino Epiphany Netscape
Netscape
7 Opera 6–6.1

2003

GreenBrowser Maxthon Opera 7–7.3 Safari SlimBrowser

2004

Avant Browser
Avant Browser
9 Phoenix/Firebird/Firefox Opera 7.5–7.55

2005

AOL
AOL
Explorer Deepnet Explorer Firefox
Firefox
1.5 Opera 8–8.54 Safari 2

2006

Avant Browser
Avant Browser
11 Firefox
Firefox
2 Internet Explorer
Internet Explorer
7 Opera 9–9.27

2007

Maxthon
Maxthon
2 Opera 9.5–9.64 Safari 3 SeaMonkey
SeaMonkey
1.1

2008

Google Chrome Firefox
Firefox
3 Netscape
Netscape
Browser Netscape Navigator
Netscape Navigator
9 NetSurf
NetSurf
1.2

2009

Avant Browser
Avant Browser
11.7 Google Chrome
Google Chrome
2–3 Firefox
Firefox
3.5 Internet Explorer
Internet Explorer
8 Opera 10–10.63 Pale Moon Safari 4 SeaMonkey
SeaMonkey
2.0

2010s

2010

Google Chrome
Google Chrome
4–8 Firefox
Firefox
3.6 Lunascape
Lunascape
6.0.1 Maxthon
Maxthon
3 NetSurf
NetSurf
2.5 Opera 11–11.64 Safari 5

2011

Google Chrome
Google Chrome
9–16 Firefox
Firefox
4–9 Internet Explorer
Internet Explorer
9 Lunascape
Lunascape
6.5 Opera 12–12.17 SeaMonkey
SeaMonkey
2.1–2.4 Waterfox

2012

Google Chrome
Google Chrome
17–23 Firefox
Firefox
10–17 Internet Explorer
Internet Explorer
10 Lunascape
Lunascape
6.7 Maxthon
Maxthon
3.4 NetSurf
NetSurf
2.9 Safari 6

2013

Google Chrome
Google Chrome
24–31 Firefox
Firefox
18–26 Internet Explorer
Internet Explorer
11 Opera 15–18 Safari 7 SeaMonkey
SeaMonkey
2.15–2.22

2014

Google Chrome
Google Chrome
32–39 Firefox
Firefox
27–34 Lunascape
Lunascape
6.9 NetSurf
NetSurf
3.1 Opera 19–26 Safari 8 SeaMonkey
SeaMonkey
2.23–2.31

2015

Google Chrome
Google Chrome
40–47 Firefox
Firefox
35–43 Lunascape
Lunascape
6.10–6.12 Microsoft
Microsoft
Edge 20, 25 Opera 27–34 Safari 9 SeaMonkey
SeaMonkey
2.32–2.39 Vivaldi

2016

Google Chrome
Google Chrome
48–55 Firefox
Firefox
44–50 Lunascape
Lunascape
6.13–6.15 Microsoft
Microsoft
Edge 38 Opera 35–42 Safari 10

2017

Basilisk Brave Google Chrome
Google Chrome
56–63 Firefox
Firefox
51–57 Microsoft
Microsoft
Edge 40–41 Opera 43–49 Safari 11 SeaMonkey
SeaMonkey
2.46–2.49

Related topics

3D Markup Language for Web Aliweb ARPANET ASCII BITNET Browser wars CompuServe Elm Email File
File
Transfer Protocol Gopher HTML HyperCard HyTelnet NCSA Telnet NLS Prodigy Teletext Telnet Usenet UUCP Videotex Viewdata Virtual Reality Markup Language Web page Whole Internet
Internet
User's Guide and Catalog World Wide Web X.25

v t e

Web browsers

Comparison

lightweight

History List

for Unix

Timeline Usage share

Features

Ad filtering Augmented browsing Bookmarks

Bookmarklet Live bookmark Smart Bookmarks

Browser extension Browser security Browser synchronizer

comparison

Cookies Download manager Favicon Incremental search Plug-in Privacy mode Tabs Universal Edit Button

Web standards

Acid tests Cascading Style Sheets HTML HTML5 JavaScript MathML SVG WebGL XHTML

Protocols

HTTP HTTPS OCSP SPDY SSL/TLS WebSocket WPAD

Related topics

BrowserChoice.eu CRL iLoo Internet
Internet
suite Man-in-the-browser Mobile Web Offline reader PAC Pwn2Own Rich Internet
Internet
application Site-specific browser Widget World Wide Web XML

Desktop

Blink-based

Brave Chrome Chromium Dragon Falkon Opera Sleipnir Slimjet SRWare Iron UC Browser Vivaldi Yandex Browser Sputnik SafeZone Whale

Gecko-based

AT&T Pogo Avant Camino Firefox

Conkeror GNU IceCat IceDragon Swiftfox Swiftweasel TenFourFox Timberwolf Tor Browser Waterfox xB Browser

Galeon Ghostzilla Goanna

Basilisk Pale Moon

K-Meleon Kazehakase Kirix Strata Lotus Symphony Lunascape Mozilla

Beonex Communicator Classilla Netscape SeaMonkey

Trident-based

AOL
AOL
Explorer Avant Deepnet Explorer GreenBrowser Internet
Internet
Explorer Lunascape Maxthon MediaBrowser MenuBox NeoPlanet NetCaptor SlimBrowser SpaceTime UltraBrowser WebbIE ZAC Browser

WebKit-based

Arora Avant Dooble Epic Flock Fluid iCab Konqueror Lunascape Maxthon Midori OmniWeb Origyn Web Browser Otter Browser QtWeb rekonq Safari Shiira SlimBoat surf Torch Uzbl Epiphany WebPositive xombrero

Text-based

ELinks Emacs/W3 Line Mode Browser Links Lynx w3m

Other

abaco Amaya Arachne Arena Charon Dillo eww Gazelle HotJava IBM
IBM
Home Page Reader IBrowse KidZui Microsoft
Microsoft
Edge Mosaic Mothra NetPositive NetSurf Qihoo 360 Secure Browser

Mobile

Blink-based

Android Browser Chromium

Brave Chrome for Android Opera Mobile Silk

Firefox
Firefox
Focus for Android

Gecko-based

Firefox
Firefox
for Android MicroB Minimo Waterfox

WebKit-based

BOLT Dolphin Browser Chrome for iOS Firefox
Firefox
for iOS Firefox
Firefox
Focus for iOS Maxthon Mercury Browser Nokia Browser for Symbian Opera Coast Rockmelt Safari Steel

Other

Blazer CM Browser Deepfish Internet Explorer
Internet Explorer
Mobile Iris Browser Konqueror
Konqueror
Embedded Microsoft
Microsoft
Edge NetFront Opera Mini Skweezer Skyfire Teashark ThunderHawk UC Browser Vision WinWAP

Television and video game console

Gecko-based

Kylo

Presto-based

Internet
Internet
Channel

WebKit-based

Google TV Nintendo 3DS Internet
Internet
Browser Nintendo DS & DSi Browser NetFront Steam Overlay Wii U Internet
Internet
Browser

Other

MSN TV

Software no longer in development shown in italics

Category Commons Internet
Internet
porta

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