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Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
is an American animated cartoon series of comedy short films produced by Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
in 1931 to 1969, during the golden age of American animation. As with its sister series, Looney Tunes, it featured some of the most famous cartoon characters ever created; including Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig
Porky Pig
and Elmer Fudd. Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
was originally produced by Harman-Ising Pictures from 1931 to 1933, and then Leon Schlesinger
Leon Schlesinger
Productions from 1933 to 1944. Schlesinger sold his studio to Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
in 1944, and the newly renamed Warner Bros. Cartoons
Warner Bros. Cartoons
continued production until 1963. It was outsourced to DePatie–Freleng Enterprises
DePatie–Freleng Enterprises
and Format Productions from 1964 to 1967, and Warner Bros.-Seven Arts
Warner Bros.-Seven Arts
Animation resumed production for its final two years.[1] Three of the Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
films (Tweetie Pie, Speedy Gonzales
Speedy Gonzales
and Birds Anonymous) won the Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Animated Short Film and another three (Duck Amuck, One Froggy Evening
One Froggy Evening
and What's Opera, Doc?) have been inducted into the National Film Registry
National Film Registry
of the Library of Congress.[2][3][4][5] In 2013, TV Guide
TV Guide
ranked the Warner Bros. Cartoons
Warner Bros. Cartoons
(ranked as Looney Tunes) the third Greatest Cartoon of All Time (out of 60).[6]

Contents

1 Background 2 Blue Ribbon reissues 3 Filmography 4 Accolades

4.1 Inducted into the National Film Registry 4.2 Academy Awards for Best Short Subject (Cartoon) 4.3 Academy Award
Academy Award
nominations

5 See also 6 References 7 External links

Background[edit] Producer Leon Schlesinger
Leon Schlesinger
had already produced one cartoon in the Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
series, based on music, and its success prompted him to try to sell a sister series to Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
His selling point was that the new cartoons would feature music from the soundtracks of Warner Bros. films and would thus serve as advertisements for Warner Bros. recordings and sheet music. The studio agreed, and Schlesinger dubbed the series Merrie Melodies. Walt Disney Productions
Walt Disney Productions
had already scored with their Silly Symphonies. Since cartoon production usually began with a soundtrack, animating a piece of music made it easier to devise plot elements and even characters. The origins of the Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
series begin with the failure of a live action series of musical shorts called Spooney Melodies, which featured popular songs of the day. These shorts were basically an early type of music video that included segments with a popular artist singing along with appropriate background sequences. Warner Bros. wanted to promote this music because they had recently acquired (in 1930) the ownership of Brunswick Records
Brunswick Records
along with four music publishers for US $28 million. Because of the success of their Looney Tunes series, Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
decided to develop a new series of animated musical shorts called Merrie Melodies. Hugh Harman and Rudolf Ising led the development. It was meant to be a series of musical cartoons that featured hit songs of the day, especially those then owned by Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
and featured in their musical films. In 1931, many of the shorts featured the orchestra of Abe Lyman, one of the most famous band leaders of his day. The first cartoon of the new Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
series was Lady, Play Your Mandolin!, released in 1931.[1] Ising attempted to introduce several characters in his Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
films, such as Piggy, Foxy, and Goopy Geer. Eventually however, the series continued without any recurring characters. The shorts proved to be enormously popular with the public. In 1932, a Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
cartoon, entitled It's Got Me Again!, was nominated for the first Academy Award
Academy Award
to be given for animation. When Harman and Ising left Warner Bros., in 1933, they took with them all rights to the characters they had created. Leon Schlesinger
Leon Schlesinger
had to negotiate with them to keep the rights to the name Merrie Melodies, as well as for the right to use the slogan, So Long Folks, at the end of the cartoons. In 1934, Schlesinger produced his first color Merrie Melodies shorts, Honeymoon Hotel and Beauty and the Beast, which were produced in two-strip Cinecolor (Disney then had exclusive animation rights to the richer three-strip Technicolor
Technicolor
process).[7] Their success convinced Schlesinger to produce all future Merrie Melodies shorts in color, using two-strip Technicolor. Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
continued in black and white until 1943. In 1936, the cartoons began to end with the slogan "That's all Folks!" which had previously only been used on the Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
series. The old slogan "So Long, Folks!" was completely abandoned at this time. The same year, Merrie Melodies began using the bulls-eye opening and closing title sequences (in 1942, Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
would use the same titles, usually in thicker rings). Also by 1936, Disney's exclusivity on the three-color Technicolor
Technicolor
process was lifted, allowing Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
a full color palette for the first time, hence the use of the blue concentric rings (as a technical test) for the rest of the 1935–36 season and the 1936–37 season. The Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
shield was later that year changed to cyan before definitely changing back to red in 1938.

Title Card for Bingo Crosbyana

Contractually, Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
cartoons were obligated to include at least one full chorus from a Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
song. Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
requested that these songs be performed by name bands whenever possible, but this lasted only through the first few shorts. The policy annoyed the animators of Merrie Melodies, since the songs often interrupted the cartoons' momentum and pacing (the 1938 Merrie Melodie A Feud There Was, for example, sarcastically uses the obligatory musical number as a shift in the action, with the lead characters singing the number into a KFWB
KFWB
microphone and ceding the mike to an announcer who reads a commercial). By 1939, the animators had been released from this obligation, and the Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
shorts came to resemble more closely the black-and-white Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
series. In addition, several new characters were created to (initially) appear exclusively in the Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
series, such as Egghead (who became Elmer Fudd), Inki, Sniffles
Sniffles
and even Warner Bros.' most popular cartoon star; Bugs Bunny. In 1942, Schlesinger began producing Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
in color as well, and the two series became virtually indistinguishable except by their theme music and opening titles – in addition, characters once exclusive to one series began regularly appearing in the other as well. In 1944, the studio went to an all-color schedule; though for the first year of this, Bugs still appeared mainly in the Merrie Melodies series (not appearing in a Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
cartoon until the end of August), whereas Daffy Duck
Daffy Duck
and Porky Pig
Porky Pig
(who each appeared in a few Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
prior to mid-1942) appeared mainly in Looney Tunes that year. It was not until 1945 that the two series appeared completely indistinguishable, and that Bugs appeared in more Looney Tunes than Merrie Melodies. By 1937, the theme music for Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
was "The Merry-Go-Round Broke Down" by Cliff Friend
Cliff Friend
and Dave Franklin and the theme music for Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
was an adaptation of "Merrily We Roll Along" by Charles Tobias, Murray Mencher and Eddie Cantor
Eddie Cantor
(the original theme was "Get Happy" by Harold Arlen, played at a faster tempo). This continued until 1964, when the WB cartoon logos were modernized, and "The Merry-Go-Round Broke Down" became the theme for the Merrie Melodies as well. When the studio went to full color, even the animators themselves did not make any creative distinction between the two series, as evidenced in an interview quote from director Friz Freleng, "I never knew if a film I was making would be Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
or Merrie Melodies, and what the hell difference would it make, anyway?". The last Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
cartoon was Injun Trouble released in 1969. The Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
theatrical cartoons didn't start up again until 1988 with only two cartoons made, The Night of the Living Duck (1988) and (Blooper) Bunny
(Blooper) Bunny
(1991), the former got a theatrical release through the compilation film Daffy Duck's Quackbusters
Daffy Duck's Quackbusters
(1988) and the latter was originally supposed to be released in 1991 but got shelved for several years until it premiered on Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
on June 13, 1997. Blue Ribbon reissues[edit] Main article: List of Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
cartoons with Blue Ribbon reissues

1955–56 season rings with Blue Ribbon version of Merrie Melodies opening titles, taken from Kit for Cat, one of only five post-1948 era credit-less Blue Ribbon and the only that was originally a Looney Tunes short.

Beginning in late 1943, WB, in a cost-conserving effort, began to reissue its backlog of color cartoons under a new program that they called Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
"Blue Ribbon" classics. For the reissue, the original front-and-end title sequences were altered. The revised main title card began with the "zooming" WB logo, followed by the title logo set against a background featuring a "blue ribbon" (hence the re-release program's title) and a Grand Shorts Award trophy, followed by the name of the cartoon. This revised title sequence eliminated the opening technical credits. The end title card was also revised (except for the 1943–44 season and half of the 1944–45 season of reissues, such as A Wild Hare and I Love to Singa when Schlesinger was still producing the cartoons), replacing the original versions. The revised title sequences were edited right into the original negative[citation needed], thus the original title sequences were cut away and possibly scrapped[citation needed]. Some of these same revised "blue ribbon" reissues can still be seen on television today. For example, the "Blue Ribbon" version of the Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
short A Wild Hare was retitled The Wild Hare for reissue, along with some slight subtle edits (the original unaltered version has been released on LaserDisc, DVD
DVD
and Blu-ray Disc). Filmography[edit] Main article: Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
and Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
filmography Accolades[edit] Inducted into the National Film Registry[edit]

What's Opera, Doc?
What's Opera, Doc?
(1957), inducted in the 1992 list[5]. "In this animation classic, Elmer Fudd's pursuit of Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
is set to opera music and plays out on a Wagnerian scale. The film features such now-classic lines as "Kill the wabbit!" and is one of only three cartoons in which Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
bests his rival Bugs. Directed by renowned animator Chuck Jones
Chuck Jones
and his team at Warner Bros., this seven-minute short film is often considered to be Jones' cinematic masterpiece. It also holds the distinction of being the first cartoon selected for inclusion on the National Film Registry."[8]

Duck Amuck
Duck Amuck
(1953), inducted in the 1999 list[5]. The description reads: "One of the defining examples of Chuck Jones' irreverent creativity, "Duck Amuck" (a Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
"Merrie Melodies" animation) stars Daffy Duck, as brought to life by master voice artist Mel Blanc. Jones' gives the audience a convincingly fleshed-out character with true personality, regardless of plot or setting. Daffy begins the film as a Musketeer before his animators get the best of him by forgetting to draw in his backgrounds or supply him his voice. Extraordinarily self-reflexive, "Duck Amuck" does more than pierce film's fourth wall, it demolishes it, sending Daffy on a series of surreal misadventures."[9]

One Froggy Evening
One Froggy Evening
(1955), inducted in the 2003 list[5]. The description reads: "A cartoon on every short list of the greatest animation, this classic Chuck Jones
Chuck Jones
creation features crooning amphibian Michigan J. Frog, who drives his owner insane by singing only in private, but never in public."[10]

Academy Awards for Best Short Subject (Cartoon)[edit]

Tweetie Pie
Tweetie Pie
(1947)[2] Speedy Gonzales
Speedy Gonzales
(1955)[3] Birds Anonymous
Birds Anonymous
(1957)[4]

Academy Award
Academy Award
nominations[edit]

It's Got Me Again! (1932) Detouring America (1939) A Wild Hare (1940)[11] Hiawatha's Rabbit Hunt (1941)[12] Rhapsody in Rivets
Rhapsody in Rivets
(1941) Pigs in a Polka
Pigs in a Polka
(1943) Greetings Bait (1943) Life with Feathers
Life with Feathers
(1945) Walky Talky Hawky
Walky Talky Hawky
(1946) Beep Prepared (1961) Nelly's Folly
Nelly's Folly
(1962)

See also[edit]

Television in the United States portal

Looney Tunes Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Cartoons Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
and Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
filmography

Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
and Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
filmography (1929–39) Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
and Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
filmography (1940–49) Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
and Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
filmography (1950–59) Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
and Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
filmography (1960–69) Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
and Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
filmography (1970–present and miscellaneous)

List of Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
cartoons with Blue Ribbon reissues

References[edit]

^ a b "Merrie Melodies" www.bcdb.com, April 12, 2012 ^ a b "1947 academy awards". Retrieved 2013-06-26.  ^ a b "1955 academy awards". Retrieved 2013-06-26.  ^ a b "1957 academy awards". Retrieved 2013-06-26.  ^ a b c d " National Film Registry
National Film Registry
List". The Library of Congress. Retrieved 2018-03-19.  ^ Rich Sands (September 24, 2013). " TV Guide
TV Guide
Magazine's 60 Greatest Cartoons of All Time". TVGuide.com.  ^ Gabler, Neal. Walt Disney: The Triumph of the American Imagination. p. 181.  ^ https://www.loc.gov/programs/national-film-preservation-board/film-registry/descriptions-and-essays/ ^ https://www.loc.gov/programs/national-film-preservation-board/film-registry/descriptions-and-essays/ ^ https://www.loc.gov/programs/national-film-preservation-board/film-registry/descriptions-and-essays/ ^ "1940 academy awards". Retrieved 2007-09-20.  ^ "1941 academy awards". Retrieved 2013-02-10. 

Beck, Jerry and Friedwald, Will (1989): Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
and Merrie Melodies: A Complete Illustrated Guide to the Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Cartoons. Henry Holt and Company. Goldmark, Daniel (2005). Tunes for ’Toons : Music and the Hollywood Cartoon. Berkeley: University of California Press. ISBN 0-520-23617-3 Schneider, Steve (1990). That's All Folks!: The Art of Warner Bros. Animation. Henry Holt & Co.

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Merrie Melodies.

The Big Cartoon Database entry for Merrie Melodies

Links to related articles

v t e

Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
and Merrie Melodies

Studios

Harman-Ising Productions (1930–1933) Leon Schlesinger
Leon Schlesinger
Productions (1933–1944) Warner Bros. Cartoons
Warner Bros. Cartoons
(1944–1964) DePatie–Freleng Enterprises
DePatie–Freleng Enterprises
(1964–1967, 1979–1980) Format Films (1965–1967) Warner Bros.-Seven Arts
Warner Bros.-Seven Arts
(1967–1969) Chuck Jones
Chuck Jones
Enterprises (1976–1980, 1994–1997) Warner Bros. Animation
Warner Bros. Animation
(1980–present)

People

Tex Avery Bea Benaderet Mel Blanc Bernard B. Brown Arthur Q. Bryan John Burton Daws Butler Bob Clampett Cal Dalton Arthur Davis David H. DePatie Earl Duvall Milt Franklyn Stan Freberg Friz Freleng June Foray Ben Hardaway Hugh Harman Ken Harris William L. Hendricks Cal Howard Rudolf Ising Chuck Jones Jack King William Lava Abe Levitow Michael Maltese Frank Marsales Norman McCabe Robert McKimson Tom Palmer Hawley Pratt Virgil Ross Leon Schlesinger Rod Scribner Edward Selzer Norman Spencer Carl Stalling Frank Tashlin Ben Washam

Characters

Babbit and Catstello Barnyard Dawg Beaky Buzzard Beans Blacque Jacque Shellacque Bosko Buddy Bugs Bunny Bunny and Claude Cecil Turtle Charlie Dog Claude Cat Clyde Bunny Colonel Shuffle Conrad the Cat Cool Cat Count Blood Count The Crusher Daffy Duck Egghead Jr. Elmer Fudd Foghorn Leghorn Foxy Gabby Goat Goofy Gophers Goopy Geer Gossamer Granny Hector the Bulldog Henery Hawk Hippety Hopper Honey Bunny Hubie and Bertie Hugo the Abominable Snowman Inki Lola Bunny Marc Antony and Pussyfoot Marvin the Martian Melissa Duck Merlin the Magic Mouse Michigan J. Frog Miss Prissy Nasty Canasta Penelope Pussycat Pepé Le Pew Pete Puma Petunia Pig Piggy Playboy Penguin Porky Pig Ralph Wolf The Road Runner Rocky and Mugsy Sam Sheepdog Slowpoke Rodriguez Sniffles Speedy Gonzales Spike the Bulldog and Chester the Terrier Sylvester Sylvester Jr. Taz The Three Bears Tweety Wile E. Coyote Willoughby Witch Hazel Yosemite Sam

Shorts

1929–1939 1940–1949 1950–1959 1960–1969 1970–present and miscellaneous Featuring Bugs Bunny Featuring Daffy Duck Featuring Porky Pig Blue Ribbon reissues Censored Eleven Unreleased

Television

Compilations

The Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
Show The Road Runner Show The Porky Pig
Porky Pig
Show Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
on Nickelodeon Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
Starring Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
& Friends Bugs 'n' Daffy

Originals

Tiny Toon Adventures Taz-Mania The Plucky Duck Show The Sylvester & Tweety
Tweety
Mysteries Baby Looney Tunes Duck Dodgers Loonatics Unleashed The Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
Show Wabbit/New Looney Tunes Specials

Feature films

Compilations

The Bugs Bunny/Road Runner Movie The Looney Looney Looney Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
Movie Bugs Bunny's 3rd Movie: 1001 Rabbit Tales Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island Daffy Duck's Quackbusters The Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
Hall of Fame

Made for video

Tweety's High-Flying Adventure Bah, Humduck! A Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
Christmas Looney Tunes: Rabbits Run

Documentaries

Bugs Bunny: Superstar Bugs & Daffy: The Wartime Cartoons Chuck Amuck: The Movie

Live-action/ animation

Space Jam Looney Tunes: Back in Action

Music/Songs

"Merrily We Roll Along" "The Merry-Go-Round Broke Down" "Powerhouse" "The Gold Diggers' Song (We're in the Money)" "Camptown Races"

Other

Video games

Book Category

v t e

Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Animation

Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
and Merrie Melodies

Shorts

characters

The Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
Show The Looney Looney Looney Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
Movie (1981) Bugs Bunny's 3rd Movie: 1001 Rabbit Tales (1982) Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island
Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island
(1983) Daffy Duck's Quackbusters
Daffy Duck's Quackbusters
(1988) Tiny Toon Adventures

characters

Taz-Mania The Plucky Duck Show The Sylvester & Tweety
Tweety
Mysteries Space Jam
Space Jam
(1996) Baby Looney Tunes Duck Dodgers

characters

Looney Tunes: Back in Action (2003) Loonatics Unleashed

characters

The Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
Show

episodes

New Looney Tunes

DC Comics

Batman: The Animated Series Superman: The Animated Series The New Batman
Batman
Adventures Batman
Batman
Beyond Static Shock The Zeta Project Justice League Teen Titans Justice League
Justice League
Unlimited The Batman Krypto the Superdog Legion of Super Heroes Batman: The Brave and the Bold Young Justice Green Lantern: The Animated Series DC Nation Shorts Teen Titans
Teen Titans
Go! Beware the Batman Justice League: Gods and Monsters Chronicles Vixen Justice League
Justice League
Action Freedom Fighters: The Ray Constantine: City of Demons DC Super Hero Girls

TV series

Scooby-Doo

What's New, Scooby-Doo? Shaggy & Scooby-Doo
Scooby-Doo
Get a Clue! Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated Be Cool, Scooby-Doo! Scoobynatural

Animaniacs

Animaniacs

characters

Pinky and the Brain Pinky, Elmyra & the Brain Animaniacs
Animaniacs
(reboot; 2020)

Tom and Jerry

Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
Tales The Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
Show

The Lego Movie

The Lego Movie
The Lego Movie
(2014) The Lego Batman
Batman
Movie (2017) The Lego Ninjago Movie (2017) Unikitty! The Lego Movie
The Lego Movie
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Theatrical feature-length films

The Looney Looney Looney Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
Movie (1981) Bugs Bunny's 3rd Movie: 1001 Rabbit Tales (1982) Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island
Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island
(1983) Daffy Duck's Quackbusters
Daffy Duck's Quackbusters
(1988) Batman: Mask of the Phantasm (1993) Space Jam
Space Jam
(1996) Quest for Camelot
Quest for Camelot
(1998) The Iron Giant
The Iron Giant
(1999) Osmosis Jones
Osmosis Jones
(2001) Looney Tunes: Back in Action (2003) The Lego Movie
The Lego Movie
(2014) Storks (2016) The Lego Batman
Batman
Movie (2017) The Lego Ninjago Movie (2017) Teen Titans Go! To the Movies
Teen Titans Go! To the Movies
(2018) Smallfoot (2018) The Lego Movie
The Lego Movie
Sequel (2019)

Other TV series

Freakazoid! Histeria! Coconut Fred's Fruit Salad Island Detention Baby Blues Ozzy & Drix ¡Mucha Lucha!
¡Mucha Lucha!
(characters) 3 South Xiaolin Showdown Firehouse Tales Johnny Test

characters

Road Rovers Mad ThunderCats Waynehead Mike Tyson Mysteries Bunnicula Right Now Kapow Dorothy and the Wizard of Oz Wacky Races Green Eggs and Ham

Television specials

A Miser Brothers' Christmas (2008) Scooby-Doo! Spooky Games (2012) Robot Chicken DC Comics
DC Comics
Special
Special
(2012 Scooby-Doo! Haunted Holidays (2012) Scooby-Doo! and the Spooky Scarecrow
Scooby-Doo! and the Spooky Scarecrow
(2013) Scooby-Doo! Mecha Mutt Menace (2013) Robot Chicken DC Comics
DC Comics
Special
Special
2: Villains in Paradise (2014) Scooby-Doo! Ghastly Goals (2014) Tom and Jerry: Santa's Little Helpers (2014) Lego DC Comics: Batman
Batman
Be-Leaguered (2014) Elf: Buddy's Musical Christmas (2014) Scooby-Doo! and the Beach Beastie (2015) Robot Chicken DC Comics
DC Comics
Special
Special
III: Magical Friendship (2015) Lego Scooby-Doo! Knight Time Terror (2015) DC Super Hero Girls: Super Hero High (2016)

Direct-to-video films

Tiny Toon Adventures: How I Spent My Vacation (1992) Batman
Batman
& Mr. Freeze: SubZero (1998) Scooby-Doo
Scooby-Doo
on Zombie Island (1998) Scooby-Doo! and the Witch's Ghost
Scooby-Doo! and the Witch's Ghost
(1999) Wakko's Wish
Wakko's Wish
(1999) Tweety's High-Flying Adventure (2000) Scooby-Doo
Scooby-Doo
and the Alien Invaders (2000) Batman
Batman
Beyond: Return of the Joker (2000) Scooby-Doo
Scooby-Doo
and the Cyber Chase (2001) Tom and Jerry: The Magic Ring (2002) Baby Looney Tunes' Eggs-traordinary Adventure
Baby Looney Tunes' Eggs-traordinary Adventure
(2003) Scooby-Doo! and the Legend of the Vampire
Scooby-Doo! and the Legend of the Vampire
(2003) Scooby-Doo! and the Monster of Mexico
Scooby-Doo! and the Monster of Mexico
(2003) Batman: Mystery of the Batwoman (2003) Scooby-Doo! and the Loch Ness Monster
Scooby-Doo! and the Loch Ness Monster
(2004) Kangaroo Jack: G'Day U.S.A.! (2004) ¡Mucha Lucha!: The Return of El Maléfico (2005) Tom and Jerry: Blast Off to Mars (2005) Aloha, Scooby-Doo!
Aloha, Scooby-Doo!
(2005) Tom and Jerry: The Fast and the Furry (2005) The Batman
Batman
vs. Dracula (2005) Scooby-Doo! in Where's My Mummy?
Scooby-Doo! in Where's My Mummy?
(2005) Scooby-Doo! Pirates Ahoy!
Scooby-Doo! Pirates Ahoy!
(2005) Superman: Brainiac Attacks (2006) Tom and Jerry: Shiver Me Whiskers (2006) Teen Titans: Trouble in Tokyo (2006) Bah, Humduck! A Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
Christmas (2006) Chill Out, Scooby-Doo!
Chill Out, Scooby-Doo!
(2007) Superman: Doomsday (2007) Tom and Jerry: A Nutcracker Tale (2007) Justice League: The New Frontier (2008) Batman: Gotham Knight (2008) Scooby-Doo! and the Goblin King
Scooby-Doo! and the Goblin King
(2008) Wonder Woman (2009) Scooby-Doo! and the Samurai Sword
Scooby-Doo! and the Samurai Sword
(2009) Green Lantern: First Flight (2009) Superman/Batman: Public Enemies (2009) Scooby-Doo! Abracadabra-Doo
Scooby-Doo! Abracadabra-Doo
(2010) Justice League: Crisis on Two Earths (2010) Batman: Under the Red Hood (2010) Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
Meet Sherlock Holmes (2010) Scooby-Doo! Camp Scare (2010) Superman/Batman: Apocalypse (2010) All-Star Superman
Superman
(2011) Green Lantern: Emerald Knights (2011) Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
and the Wizard of Oz (2011) Scooby-Doo! Legend of the Phantosaur
Scooby-Doo! Legend of the Phantosaur
(2011) Batman: Year One (2011) Justice League: Doom (2012) Scooby-Doo! Music of the Vampire
Scooby-Doo! Music of the Vampire
(2012) Superman
Superman
vs. The Elite (2012) Batman: The Dark Knight Returns (2012/2013) Tom and Jerry: Robin Hood and His Merry Mouse (2012) Big Top Scooby-Doo!
Big Top Scooby-Doo!
(2012) Scooby-Doo! Mask of the Blue Falcon
Scooby-Doo! Mask of the Blue Falcon
(2013) Superman: Unbound (2013) Scooby-Doo! Adventures: The Mystery Map (2013) Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox (2013) Tom and Jerry's Giant Adventure
Tom and Jerry's Giant Adventure
(2013) Scooby-Doo! Stage Fright
Scooby-Doo! Stage Fright
(2013) JLA Adventures: Trapped in Time (2014) Justice League: War (2014) Scooby-Doo! WrestleMania Mystery
Scooby-Doo! WrestleMania Mystery
(2014) Son of Batman
Batman
(2014) Batman: Assault on Arkham (2014) Scooby-Doo! Frankencreepy
Scooby-Doo! Frankencreepy
(2014) Tom and Jerry: The Lost Dragon (2014) Justice League: Throne of Atlantis (2015) Lego DC Comics
DC Comics
Super Heroes: Justice League
Justice League
vs. Bizarro League (2015) Scooby-Doo! Moon Monster Madness
Scooby-Doo! Moon Monster Madness
(2015) The Flintstones & WWE: Stone Age SmackDown! (2015) Batman
Batman
vs. Robin (2015) Batman
Batman
Unlimited: Animal Instincts (2015) Tom and Jerry: Spy Quest (2015) Scooby-Doo! and Kiss: Rock and Roll Mystery (2015) Justice League: Gods and Monsters (2015) Looney Tunes: Rabbits Run (2015) Batman
Batman
Unlimited: Monster Mayhem (2015) Lego DC Comics
DC Comics
Super Heroes: Justice League
Justice League
– Attack of the Legion of Doom (2015) Batman: Bad Blood (2016) Lego DC Comics
DC Comics
Super Heroes: Justice League
Justice League
– Cosmic Clash (2016) Justice League
Justice League
vs. Teen Titans
Teen Titans
(2016) Lego Scooby-Doo! Haunted Hollywood
Lego Scooby-Doo! Haunted Hollywood
(2016) Tom and Jerry: Back to Oz (2016) Lego DC Comics
DC Comics
Super Heroes: Justice League
Justice League
– Gotham City Breakout (2016) Batman: The Killing Joke (2016) Scooby-Doo! and WWE: Curse of the Speed Demon (2016) DC Super Hero Girls: Hero of the Year (2016) Batman
Batman
Unlimited: Mechs vs. Mutants (2016) Batman: Return of the Caped Crusaders (2016) Justice League
Justice League
Dark (2017) Scooby-Doo! Shaggy's Showdown
Scooby-Doo! Shaggy's Showdown
(2017) The Jetsons & WWE: Robo-WrestleMania! (2017) Teen Titans: The Judas Contract (2017) DC Super Hero Girls: Intergalactic Games (2017) Tom and Jerry: Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (2017) Lego Scooby-Doo! Blowout Beach Bash
Lego Scooby-Doo! Blowout Beach Bash
(2017) Lego DC Super Hero Girls: Brain Drain (2017) Batman
Batman
and Harley Quinn (2017) Batman
Batman
vs. Two-Face (2017) Scooby-Doo! & Batman: The Brave and the Bold (2018) Batman: Gotham by Gaslight (2018) Lego DC Comics
DC Comics
Super Heroes: The Flash (2018) Suicide Squad: Hell to Pay (2018) Batman
Batman
Ninja (2018) Lego DC Super Hero Girls: Super-Villain High (2018)

Short films

The Duxorcist (1987) The Night of the Living Duck (1988) Box-Office Bunny
Box-Office Bunny
(1990) I'm Mad (1994) Chariots of Fur (1994) Carrotblanca (1995) Another Froggy Evening (1995) Superior Duck (1996) Pullet Surprise (1997) Marvin the Martian
Marvin the Martian
in the Third Dimension (1997) From Hare to Eternity
From Hare to Eternity
(1997) Father of the Bird (1997) Little Go Beep (2000) Chase Me
Chase Me
(2003) The Karate Guard
The Karate Guard
(2005) DC Showcase: The Spectre (2010) DC Showcase: Jonah Hex (2010) Coyote Falls
Coyote Falls
(2010) Fur of Flying
Fur of Flying
(2010) DC Showcase: Green Arrow (2010) Superman/Shazam!: The Return of Black Adam (2010) Rabid Rider
Rabid Rider
(2010) DC Showcase: Catwoman (2011) I Tawt I Taw a Puddy Tat
I Tawt I Taw a Puddy Tat
(2011) Daffy's Rhapsody
Daffy's Rhapsody
(2012) The Master (2016)

See also

Warner Animation Group Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Cartoons Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Family Entertainment Hanna-Barbera Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Productions

Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Studios Williams Street Cartoon Network
Cartoon Network
Studios Europe

Category

v t e

DePatie–Freleng Enterprises

Founders

David H. DePatie Friz Freleng

Theatrical shorts (original)

The Pink Panther (1964–1980) The Inspector
The Inspector
(1965–1969) Roland and Rattfink (1968–1971) The Ant and the Aardvark
The Ant and the Aardvark
(1969–1971) Tijuana Toads
Tijuana Toads
(1969–1972) The Blue Racer
The Blue Racer
(1972–1974) Hoot Kloot
Hoot Kloot
(1973–1974) The Dogfather (1974–1976)

Commissioned by Warner Bros.

Merrie Melodies/ Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
(theatrical, 1964–1967) Bugs Bunny's Easter Special
Special
(CBS/TV special, 1977) Bugs Bunny's Looney Christmas Tales
Bugs Bunny's Looney Christmas Tales
(CBS/TV special, 1979)

Television shorts

Texas Toads (1976) Misterjaw
Misterjaw
(1976) Crazylegs Crane (1978)

Television shows

The Super 6 (NBC, 1966–1969) Super President (NBC, 1967–1968) Here Comes The Grump (NBC, 1969–1970) The Pink Panther Show
The Pink Panther Show
(NBC, 1969–1971) The Pink Panther Meets The Ant and the Aardvark
The Ant and the Aardvark
(NBC, 1970–1971) Doctor Dolittle (NBC, 1970–1971) The New Pink Panther Show (NBC, 1971–1976) The Barkleys (NBC, 1972–1973) The Houndcats (NBC, 1972–1973) Bailey's Comets (CBS, 1973–1975) The Oddball Couple
The Oddball Couple
(ABC, 1975–1977) Return to the Planet of the Apes
Return to the Planet of the Apes
(NBC, 1975–1976) The Pink Panther Laugh and a Half-Hour and a Half Show (NBC, 1976–1977) Baggy Pants and the Nitwits (NBC, 1977–1978) What's New Mr. Magoo? (CBS, 1977–1979) Think! Pink Panther (NBC, 1978) The All New Pink Panther Show (ABC, 1978–1979) The Fantastic Four (NBC, 1978–1979) Spider-Woman (ABC, 1979–1980)

Television specials

The Bear Who Slept Through Christmas (NBC/TV special, 1973) My Mom's Having a Baby (ABC/TV special, 1977) Where Do Teenagers Come From? (ABC/TV special, 1980)

Dr. Seuss Television specials

The Cat in the Hat (CBS/TV special, 1971) The Lorax (CBS/TV special, 1972) Dr. Seuss
Dr. Seuss
on the Loose (CBS/TV special, 1973) The Hoober-Bloob Highway (CBS/TV special, 1975) Halloween Is Grinch Night
Halloween Is Grinch Night
(ABC/TV special, 1977) Pontoffel Pock, Where Are You? (ABC/TV special, 1980) The Grinch Grinches the Cat in the Hat (ABC/TV special, 1982)

See also

Marvel Productions
Marvel Productions
Ltd. Saban Entertainment Here Come

.