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Victor Company of Japan, Ltd (日本ビクター株式会社, Nippon Bikutā Kabushiki-gaisha), TYO: 6792, usually referred to as JVC
JVC
or The Japan
Japan
Victor Company, is a Japanese international professional and consumer electronics corporation based in Yokohama. Founded in 1927, the company is best known for introducing Japan's first televisions and for developing the Video
Video
Home System (VHS) video recorder. From 1953 to 2008, Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. was the majority stockholder in JVC. In 2008, JVC
JVC
merged with Kenwood Corporation
Corporation
to create JVC Kenwood
JVC Kenwood
Holdings.

Contents

1 History

1.1 1920s creation to World War II 1.2 Post-war 1.3 1970s, 1980s and the VHS/ Betamax
Betamax
format war 1.4 Other notable achievements 1.5 21st century

2 Sponsorship 3 Brand name 4 Subsidiaries 5 Product gallery 6 Slogans 7 See also 8 References 9 External links

History[edit]

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1920s creation to World War II[edit] JVC
JVC
was founded in 1927 as "The Victor Talking Machine Company
Victor Talking Machine Company
of Japan, Limited," a subsidiary of the United States' leading phonograph and record company, the Victor Talking Machine Company. In 1929, majority ownership was transferred to RCA-Victor. In the 1930s, JVC produced phonographs and records. In 1932, JVC
JVC
began producing radios, and in 1939 Japan's first locally-made television. JVC
JVC
severed relations with RCA
RCA
Victor during World War II. Today the record company in Japan
Japan
is known as Victor Entertainment. Post-war[edit]

JVC
JVC
HR-3300U VIDSTAR (1977)

In 1953, JVC
JVC
became majority-owned by the Panasonic
Panasonic
Corporation. Panasonic
Panasonic
released its ownership in 2007.[2] In the 1960s, JVC
JVC
established the Nivico (Nippon Victor Corporation) brand for Delmonico's line of console televisions and stereos. In 1970, JVC
JVC
marketed the Videosphere, a portable cathode ray tube (CRT) television inside a space-helmet-shaped casing with an alarm clock at the base. It was a commercial success.[citation needed] In 1971, JVC
JVC
introduced the first discrete system for four channel quadraphonic sound on vinyl records - CD-4 (Compatible Discrete Four Channel) or Quadradisc, as it was called by the Radio
Radio
Corporation
Corporation
of America (RCA) in the United States.[citation needed] In 1975, JVC
JVC
introduced the first combined portable battery-operated radio with inbuilt TV, as the model 3050. The TV was a 3-inch (7.6 cm) black-and-white cathode ray tube. One year later, JVC expanded the model to add a cassette-recorder, as the 3060, creating the world's first boombox with radio, cassette and TV.[citation needed]

KY D29 Digital-S camcorder.

In 1976, the first VCR to use VHS
VHS
was the Victor HR-3300, and was introduced by the president of JVC
JVC
at the Okura Hotel on September 9, 1976.[3][4] JVC
JVC
started selling the HR-3300 in Akihabara, Tokyo, Japan on October 31, 1976.[3] Region-specific versions of the JVC
JVC
HR-3300 were also distributed later on, such as the HR-3300U in the United States, and HR-3300EK in the United Kingdom. 1970s, 1980s and the VHS/ Betamax
Betamax
format war[edit]

JVC's VHS
VHS
tape won over Betamax
Betamax
to become common home recording format.

In the late 1970s, JVC
JVC
developed the VHS
VHS
format, introducing the first VHS
VHS
recorders to the consumer market in 1976 for the equivalent of US $1060. Sony, which had introduced the Betamax
Betamax
home videocassette tape a year earlier, became the main competitor for JVC's VHS
VHS
format into the 1980s, creating the videotape format war. The Betamax
Betamax
cassette was smaller, with slightly superior picture quality to the VHS
VHS
cassette, but this resulted in Betamax
Betamax
having less recording time. The two companies competed fiercely to encourage others to adopt their format, but by 1984 forty companies were using JVC's VHS
VHS
format, while only 12 used Betamax. Sony
Sony
began producing VHS
VHS
recorders in 1988 and after 1993 stopped making Betamax
Betamax
recorders for the US market, and then completely in 2002.[5] Other notable achievements[edit] In 1979, JVC
JVC
demonstrated a prototype of its video high density (VHD) disc system. This system was capacitance-based, like capacitance electronic disc (CED), but the discs were grooveless with the stylus being guided by servo signals in the disc surface. The VHD discs were initially handled by the operator and played on a machine that looked like an audio LP turntable, but JVC
JVC
used caddy-housed discs when the system was marketed. Development suffered numerous delays, and the product was launched in 1983 in Japan, followed by the United Kingdom in 1984, to a limited industrial market.[citation needed] In 1981, JVC
JVC
introduced a line of revolutionary direct-drive cassette decks, topped by the DD-9, that provided previously unattainable levels of speed stability.[citation needed] During the 1980s JVC
JVC
briefly marketed its own portable audio equipment similar to the Sony
Sony
Walkman on the market at the time. The JVC
JVC
CQ-F2K was released in 1982 and had a detachable radio that mounted to the headphones for a compact, wire-free listening experience. JVC
JVC
had difficulty making the products successful, and a few years later stopped making them. In Japan, JVC
JVC
marketed the products under the name "Victor".[citation needed] In 1986, JVC
JVC
released the HC-95, a personal computer with a 3.58 MHz Zilog
Zilog
Z80A processor, 64 KB RAM, running on MSX Basic 2.0. It included two 3.5" floppy disk drives and conformed to the graphics specification of the MSX-2 standard. However, like the Pioneer PX-7, it also carried a sophisticated hardware interface that handled video superimposition and various interactive video processing features. The JVC
JVC
HC-95 was first sold in Japan, and then Europe, but sales were disappointing.[citation needed] JVC
JVC
video recorders were marketed by the Ferguson Radio
Radio
Corporation
Corporation
in the UK, with just cosmetic changes. However, Ferguson needed to find another supplier for its camcorders when JVC
JVC
produced only the VHS-C format, rather than video8. Ferguson was later acquired by Thomson SA, which ended the relationship. JVC
JVC
later invented hard drive camcorders.[citation needed] 21st century[edit]

JVC
JVC
ProHD video camera (2006)

In October 2001, the National Academy of Television
Television
Arts and Sciences presented JVC
JVC
an Emmy
Emmy
Award for "outstanding achievement in technological advancement" for "Pioneering Development of Consumer Camcorders". Annual sponsorships of the world-renowned JVC
JVC
Tokyo Video Festival and the JVC
JVC
Jazz Festival have helped attract the attention of more customers.[citation needed] JVC
JVC
has been a worldwide football (soccer) supporter since 1982, having a former kit sponsorship with Arsenal and continued its role as an official partner of 2002 FIFA World Cup
2002 FIFA World Cup
Korea/Japan. JVC
JVC
made headlines as the first-ever corporate partner of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. JVC
JVC
has recently forged corporate partnerships with ESPN Zone
ESPN Zone
and Foxploration. In 2005, JVC
JVC
joined HANA, the High-Definition Audio- Video
Video
Network Alliance, to help establish standards in consumer-electronics interoperability. In 2005, JVC
JVC
announced their development of the first DVD-RW DL
DVD-RW DL
media (the dual layer version of the rewritable DVD-RW format).[6] In December 2006, Matsushita entered talks with Kenwood and Cerberus Capital Management to sell its stake in JVC.[7] In 2007, Victor Company of Japan
Japan
Ltd confirmed a strategic capital alliance with Kenwood and SPARKX Investment, resulting in Matsushita's holding being reduced to approximately 37%.[8] In March 2008, Matsushita (Panasonic) agreed to spin off the company and merge it with Kenwood Electronics, creating JVC Kenwood
JVC Kenwood
Holdings on October 1, 2008.[9] In April 2008, JVC
JVC
announced that it was closing its TV plants in East Kilbride (Scotland) and Japan. This left it with one plant in Thailand. It stated it would outsource European production to an OEM.[10] JVC
JVC
TVs for North America are now being manufactured by AmTRAN Video Corporation
Corporation
along with distribution, service, and warranty under license from JVC
JVC
Kenwood.[11] In Europe, Dixons Carphone, owner of Currys Digital
Currys Digital
and PC World
PC World
has a similar arrangement with JVC Kenwood.[12] In Europe, JVC
JVC
sells mainly some audio accessories, like headphones, and until recently DIN type car audio. Also in Europe, JVC
JVC
is present with camcorders, security cameras, audio systems and with their emblematic boom box, projectors. JVC
JVC
TV sets in Europe
Europe
are manufactured mainly by Turkish manufacturer Vestel, but are not available in all countries. Sponsorship[edit] JVC
JVC
is a well-known brand among English football (soccer) fans due to the firm's sponsorship of Arsenal Football Club from 1981 to 1999, when Sega
Sega
took over as Arsenal's sponsors. JVC's 18-year association with Arsenal is one of the longest club-sponsor associations with any professional club football.[citation needed] Also shirt sponsored Aberdeen Football Club in the eighties and early nineties. JVC
JVC
also sponsors the away shirts of the Australian A-League
A-League
club, Sydney FC, and Dutch race driver Christijan Albers.[citation needed] Brand name[edit]

Victor logo used in Japan

See also: His Master's Voice, Nipper, Victor Talking Machine Company, RCA, RCA
RCA
Records, and HMV Group JVC
JVC
is generally known within Japan
Japan
by the Victor brand, preceded by the His Master's Voice
His Master's Voice
(HMV) logo featuring the dog Nipper. Because of a conflict in trademarks between HMV and Victor, HMV is not allowed to use Nipper
Nipper
in Japan.[13] At one time, the company used the Nivico name (for "Nippon Victor Company") overseas, before rebranding to JVC, which stands for Japan's Victor Company. Therefore, the Victor and JVC-Victor web sites look quite different. Conversely, the HMV store chain exists in Japan
Japan
(though no longer owned by HMV Group), but it cannot use the His Master's Voice
His Master's Voice
motto or logo; its logo is a stylized image of a gramophone only.[14] After American corporation RCA, brought out the company in 1929 and became RCA
RCA
Victor in Japan, RCA
RCA
also had acquired the use of Nipper
Nipper
and His Master's Voice
His Master's Voice
logo, but for use in North America. Subsidiaries[edit]

JVCKENWOOD Marketing India
India
Gurgaon, Haryana, India JVC
JVC
America Inc. - Tuscaloosa, Alabama, US JVC
JVC
Americas Corp - Wayne, New Jersey, US JVC
JVC
Canada
Canada
Inc. - Mississauga, Ontario, Canada JVC
JVC
Asia - Singapore JVC
JVC
Australia
Australia
- Australia JVC
JVC
China
China
- China JVC
JVC
Europe
Europe
- United Kingdom JVC
JVC
Middle-East (and Africa) - Dubai, UAE JVC
JVC
Latin America, S.A. - Panama JVC
JVC
do Brasil Ltda. - Brazil JVC
JVC
International
International
- Austria Victor Entertainment JCVision

Product gallery[edit]

JVC
JVC
CD player

JVC
JVC
camcorder

JVC
JVC
television

JVC
JVC
boombox

JVC
JVC
KD-D10E tape deck

JVC
JVC
9F-220C radio

JVC
JVC
Picsio pocket camcorder

Slogans[edit]

Bintang Andalan Masa Depan (English: The Mainstay Star of the future, Indonesia Only, 2000-2004) The Perfect Experience (2004-present)

See also[edit]

Companies portal

List of digital camera brands List of home computers Mitsubishi Electric Taiyo Yuden
Taiyo Yuden
(partner with JVC) Video

VHS D-VHS S-VHS W-VHS Videotape Video
Video
tape recorder Videotape
Videotape
format war Videocassette
Videocassette
recorder

Wondermega XRCD

References[edit]

^ "Annual Report 2008 Financial Section for JVC" (PDF). JVC
JVC
Kenwood Holdings, Inc. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-07-22. Retrieved 2012-05-22.  ^ "Matsushita owned JVC
JVC
1953-2007". Retrieved 2012-10-08.  ^ a b "Always Helpful! Full of Information on Recording Media "Made in Japan
Japan
After All"". Nipponsei.jp. Archived from the original on 2011-01-11. Retrieved 2011-07-11.  ^ " JVC
JVC
HR-3300". Totalrewind.org. Retrieved 2011-07-11.  ^ " Video
Video
/ DVD - A Brief History of Home Video" (timeline), 2005, Entertainment Scene, webpage: ES-hvid-hist. ^ " JVC
JVC
Develops World's First Single-sided, Dual Layer DVD-RW Disc Technology" (PDF). 2005-04-04. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-12-21. Retrieved 2016-03-25. Victor Company of Japan, Ltd. (JVC) is pleased to announce that it has developed the world's first [as of April 4, 2005] single-sided, dual layer DVD-RW disc technology with a maximum storage capacity of 8.5GB  ^ "Matsushita Says No Decision on Sale of Victor Shares to Kenwood". Bloomberg. 2006-12-23. Retrieved 2012-05-22.  ^ "Kenwood, JVC
JVC
Take First Merger Steps". TWICE. 2007-08-06. Retrieved 2012-05-22.  ^ Takenaka, Kiyoshi (2008-05-12). "JVC, Kenwood to merge under holding company". Reuters. Retrieved 2012-05-22.  ^ "JAPAN NEWS: JVC
JVC
reports increased losses, plans to end TV production in UK". Retrieved 22 March 2015.  ^ "2010 - News Release - JVCKENWOOD Corporation". Archived from the original on 29 March 2015. Retrieved 22 March 2015.  ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-04-11. Retrieved 2015-03-21.  ^ "why nipper is disappearing from record labels!". Retrieved 22 March 2015.  ^ "HMV ONLINE - CD・DVD・ブルーレイ・本・雑誌・ゲーム・グッズも充実". Retrieved 22 March 2015. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to JVC.

Official website

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Panasonic

Subsidiaries

Current

Matsushita Seiko Panasonic
Panasonic
Avionics Corporation Panasonic
Panasonic
Cycle Technology Panasonic
Panasonic
Electric Works (acquired 2012) Sanyo
Sanyo
(acquired 2009) Anchor Electricals (acquired 2007) Universal Lighting Technologies Gobel Group

Former

JVC
JVC
(spun off) MCA Inc.
MCA Inc.
(sold)

Brands

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Other

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Lumix
cameras MN103 Panapet Panasonic
Panasonic
JR-200 Panasonic
Panasonic
Toot-a-Loop Radio Toughpad Panasonic
Panasonic
TR-005

Formats and standards

D5 HD M-3DI Standard Micro Four Thirds system MicroP2 MII P2 VHS Viera Cast VX

People

Toshio Iue Konosuke Matsushita Hirofumi Hirano

Other

Gamba Osaka Panasonic
Panasonic
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Panasonic
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Panasonic
cycling team Panasonic
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Panasonic
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Panasonic
Impulse

Category Commons

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Companies

Current

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JVC
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JVC Kenwood

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Defunct

Aiwa Akai Bronica Chinon Contax Konica Minolta National Norita Okaya Optical Sanyo

Other

Electronic Industries Association of Japan INCJ Japan
Japan
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Japan
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.