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Indy Racing League, LLC, doing business as IndyCar
IndyCar
(stylized INDYCAR), is an American-based auto racing sanctioning body for Indy car racing and other disciplines of open wheel car racing. The organization sanctions four racing series: the premier IndyCar
IndyCar
Series[2] with its centerpiece the Indianapolis
Indianapolis
500, and developmental series Indy Lights, the Pro Mazda Championship
Pro Mazda Championship
and the U.S. F2000 National Championship, which are all a part of The Road To Indy. IndyCar
IndyCar
is recognized as a member organization of the FIA through ACCUS. The sanctioning body was formed in 1994 under the name Indy Racing League, and began competition in 1996. The trademark name INDYCAR
INDYCAR
was officially adopted on January 1, 2011. The sport of open-wheel car racing itself, also historically referred to as Championship Car racing or Indy racing, traces its roots to as early as 1905. It is the fourth major sanctioning body to govern the sport of Indy car racing, following AAA, USAC, and Champ Car. IndyCar
IndyCar
is owned by Hulman & Company, which also owns the Indianapolis
Indianapolis
Motor Speedway complex and the Clabber Girl
Clabber Girl
brand.

Contents

1 Sanctioned series

1.1 IndyCar
IndyCar
Series 1.2 Indy Lights 1.3 Pro Mazda
Mazda
Championship 1.4 U.S. F2000

2 History

2.1 IndyCar
IndyCar
name 2.2 Split with CART 2.3 Unification with Champ Car 2.4 Driver safety

3 Fatalities 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External links

Sanctioned series[edit] IndyCar
IndyCar
Series[edit] Main article: IndyCar
IndyCar
Series The League's premier series debuted in 1996 under the name Indy Racing League. The series adopted the name Indy Racing League
Indy Racing League
IndyCar
IndyCar
Series in 2003. With Verizon
Verizon
as corporate sponsor since 2014, the series has been known as the Verizon
Verizon
IndyCar
IndyCar
Series. The series initially raced exclusively on oval tracks, as the series was founded partly in response to the increasing prominence of road and street courses on the CART schedule. In 2005, the series abandoned its unofficial ovals-only stance, and added three road–street course events. By 2009, the series had a roughly 50/50 split of ovals and road/street courses. Presently, the series currently runs one-third of its schedule on ovals and the rest on road and street circuits. Indy Lights[edit] Main article: Indy Lights Indy Lights
Indy Lights
is the development series for the IndyCar
IndyCar
series. The Indy Lights concept traces its roots back the USAC Mini Indy Series of the late 1970, and the CART ARS/ Indy Lights
Indy Lights
series that began in 1986. The current Indy Lights
Indy Lights
series debuted in 2002 under the name Infiniti Pro Series. After the 2008 open wheel unification, the Indy Lights
Indy Lights
name returned. The Indy Lights
Indy Lights
typically run as support races to IndyCar Series races, but occasionally has run stand-alone races, or as a support race of other events. The series is now promoted by Andersen Promotions. Pro Mazda
Mazda
Championship[edit] Main article: Pro Mazda
Mazda
Championship The Pro Mazda Championship
Pro Mazda Championship
presented by Goodyear is an open-wheel racecar driver development series in North America. Competitors use spec Formula Mazda
Mazda
race cars built by Star Race Cars. The original series, using first-generation tube-frame cars started in the early 1990s, with the current, high-tech, carbon-fiber car released in 2004. The series has historically included road courses, street courses, and ovals. The series' primary sponsors are Mazda
Mazda
and Cooper Tire
Cooper Tire
and the cars, while purpose built for the track with carbon fiber monocoques, are powered by 250 horsepower Mazda
Mazda
'Renesis' rotary engines. The series' stated goal is "to develop new race driving talent." In 2010, the series became a part of The Road to Indy. In 2013 the series' promotion was taken over by Andersen Promotions. U.S. F2000[edit] Main article: U.S. F2000 National Championship USF2000 is a series the organisation started sanctioning in 2010. Originally started in 1991 and folded in 2006, it was restarted in 2010 as part of the "Road to Indy" ladder series promoted by Andersen Promotions. The series utilizes tube frame Formula Ford
Formula Ford
chassis fitted with larger Mazda
Mazda
MZR four cylinder engines and wings and slicks and was originally based on the Formula Continental
Formula Continental
rules formula. History[edit] IndyCar
IndyCar
name[edit] "IndyCar" or "Indy Car" are sometimes used as a descriptive name for championship open-wheel auto racing in the United States. The Indy car name derived as a result of the genre's fundamental link to the Indianapolis
Indianapolis
500 Mile Race (often referred to as the "Indy 500"), one of the most popular auto races in the world. Beginning in 1990, the term Indy car was often used to describe the race cars in the events sanctioned by CART, which had become the dominant governing body for open-wheel racing in the United States. The Indianapolis
Indianapolis
500, however, remained sanctioned by USAC. CART recognized the Indy 500 on its schedule, and awarded points for finishers in the race from 1990 to 1995 despite not sanctioning it. The two entities operated separately, but utilized the same equipment. In 1992, the Indianapolis
Indianapolis
Motor Speedway registered the IndyCar trademark with the United States
United States
Patent and Trademark Office and licensed it to CART, which renamed its championship the IndyCar
IndyCar
World Series. All references to the name "CART" were decidedly prohibited, as the series sought to eliminate perceived confusion from casual fans with the term kart. During the 1996 season, the IndyCar
IndyCar
mark was the subject of a fierce legal battle. Prior to the 1996 season, Indianapolis
Indianapolis
Motor Speedway President Tony George
Tony George
had created his own national championship racing series, the Indy Racing League. In March 1996, CART filed a lawsuit against the Indianapolis
Indianapolis
Motor Speedway in an effort to protect their license to the IndyCar
IndyCar
mark which the Indianapolis
Indianapolis
Motor Speedway had attempted to terminate. In April, the Indianapolis
Indianapolis
Motor Speedway filed a countersuit against CART to prevent them from further use of the mark. Eventually a settlement was reached in which CART agreed to give up the use of the IndyCar
IndyCar
mark following the 1996 season and the IRL could not use the name before the end of the 2002 season. Following a six-year hiatus, Indy Racing League, LLC announced it would rename their premier series the IndyCar Series
IndyCar Series
for the 2003 racing season. Brickyard Trademarks, Inc., a subsidiary of Indianapolis
Indianapolis
Motor Speedway Corporation, is the current owner of the IndyCar
IndyCar
mark and licenses that mark to the Indy Racing League
Indy Racing League
for use in connection with the IndyCar
IndyCar
Series. CART (and its successor Champ Car) races outside the United States
United States
were still permitted to use the Indy moniker, such as the Toronto Molson Indy and Lexmark Indy 300, though the distinction is moot now, as the two series have unified. Post-unification, a heavy emphasis has been placed on deemphasizing the legal entity name and its initials and replacing it with the IndyCar
IndyCar
name. This became official on January 1, 2011, as Indy Racing League LLC adopted as its trade name INDYCAR
INDYCAR
(but not its legal business name). All legal and official documents such as race reports, investigative documents, and broadcast disclaimers state "Indy Racing League LLC." Some documents may also include "d/b/a INDYCAR." Split with CART[edit] The Indy Racing League
Indy Racing League
was founded in 1994 by Tony George
Tony George
and began racing in 1996. CART had sanctioned Indy car racing since 1979, when the organization broke away from USAC. George blueprinted the IRL as a lower-cost open-wheel alternative to CART, which had become technology-driven and dominated by a few wealthy multi-car teams, much like Formula One. It initially attracted some of the smaller teams who believed in the vision presented by Tony George. The split between the IRL and the CART governing body was acrimonious, and both series suffered because of it. The rivalry between competing groups of fans was most active on the Internet, especially on motorsports message boards, and tended to affect any attempts at impartial views of either racing series. The most bitter point of conflict between CART and the IRL was the Indianapolis
Indianapolis
500, long considered the crown jewel of North American motorsports. Although it was unquestionably the flagship race on the CART schedule, the Indy 500 was never sanctioned by CART and continued to be sanctioned by USAC until taken over by the Indy Racing League. CART did not give the Indy 500 the respect that the Indianapolis
Indianapolis
Motor Speedway felt the race deserved, treating it just like any other race. Starting with the first IRL season, Tony George
Tony George
reserved 25 of the 33 spots in the Indy 500 starting grid for cars from full-time IRL teams. This was likely done because in 1979, when CART started their own series to compete with USAC, the Indy 500 refused entries from CART teams and those teams responded by suing the speedway. In 1996, CART retaliated by scheduling what was supposed to become its new showcase event, the U.S. 500, at Michigan International Speedway
Michigan International Speedway
on Memorial Day, the traditional date for the Indy 500. The inaugural U.S. 500 was an unmitigated disaster when there was a massive crash coming to the green flag. Although CART continued to run the race until 1999, it never drew fan interest like the Indy 500. Although modified in 1999, the initial Indy 500 policy toward CART had already become less significant when the IRL came out with their own chassis specifications in 1997 and CART spec chassis were no longer legal. The new 1997 technical rules featured less expensive chassis and "production-based" engines. In addition, the IRL series ran exclusively on oval tracks. This situation allowed many American drivers from the midget and sprint car ranks to graduate to Indycars the way the greatest stars of Indy racing like A.J. Foyt, Mario Andretti, Johnny Rutherford, and the Unsers had. For the next few years, although some former CART drivers moved over to the IRL, no CART teams competed at the Indy 500. CART fans felt the Indy 500 was diminished by the absence of the CART teams, but the mass of open wheel oval track fans that support the thousands of midget and sprint car racers that compete on a weekly basis throughout the U.S. were thrilled to see drivers like Tony Stewart
Tony Stewart
and Billy Boat getting an opportunity to drive for topnotch Indycar teams. Many oval track race fans, who had switched over to watching NASCAR
NASCAR
during the CART era, came back to Indy car racing, now that there weren't any more CART style street races. At its inception, the series and George himself were criticized by members of the media and some CART competitors. Like any brand new series, the IRL's early seasons consisted of sparse schedules and inexperienced teams, even in the Indy 500. Eventually, the schedule expanded and the new technical rules produced some truly exciting racing, especially on the 1.5 mile super speedways like Texas Motor Speedway. The IRL began to draw top teams from CART starting in 2000, contributing to the latter's bankruptcy, re-branding as Champ Car
Champ Car
in 2003, and ultimate demise and absorption by the IRL in 2008. Race fans are separated more by the type of track they enjoy than by the type of car. During the 1980's and early 1990's, the CART series emphasis on road and street courses drove oval track fans away from Indycar, helping NASCAR
NASCAR
to supplant Indycar racing as the most popular auto racing sport in the United States. Tony George
Tony George
reversed that trend by creating an all oval track Indycar series, however, when Tony George was replaced as CEO of the IRL, the series started to include road and street courses in the schedule with an eye toward killing off the remnant of CART, Champ Car. Although successful in eventually absorbing Champ Car, the IndyCar Series
IndyCar Series
has now become similar in many ways to the CART series from which it separated and its related European open-wheel formula counterparts: former prominent CART teams such as Chip Ganassi Racing
Chip Ganassi Racing
and Team Penske
Team Penske
are frequent race winners, there is a strong contingent of foreign-born drivers, the cars are increasingly electronic and aero dependent and the schedule includes more road and street courses than oval tracks. As a result, many oval track fans have gone back to watching Nascar or to their local short track. Unification with Champ Car[edit] On January 23, 2008, Tony George
Tony George
offered Champ Car
Champ Car
management a proposal that included free cars and engine leases to Champ Car
Champ Car
teams willing to run the entire 2008 IndyCar Series
IndyCar Series
schedule in exchange for adding Champ Car's dates at Long Beach, Toronto, Edmonton, and Australia to the IndyCar Series
IndyCar Series
schedule, effectively reuniting American open wheel racing.[3] The offer was initially made in November 2007.[3] On February 10, 2008, Tony George, along with IRL representatives Terry Angstadt and Brian Barnhart, plus former Honda executive Robert Clarke, traveled to Japan
Japan
to discuss moving the Indy Japan
Japan
300 at Twin Ring Motegi.[4] Moving that race, or postponing it, would be required in order to accommodate the Long Beach Grand Prix, which was scheduled for the same weekend.[4] Optimism following the meeting was high.[5] In February 2008, Indy Racing League
Indy Racing League
founder and CEO Tony George
Tony George
and owners of the Champ Car
Champ Car
World Series completed an agreement to unify the sport for 2008.[6] The result was that the Champ Car
Champ Car
World Series was suspended except for the Long Beach Grand Prix. Many of the former Champ Car
Champ Car
teams moved to the IndyCar Series
IndyCar Series
using equipment provided by the League. Randy Bernard
Randy Bernard
was announced as the new IRL CEO in February 2010.[7] In 2011, the sanctioning body dropped the Indy Racing League
Indy Racing League
name, becoming IndyCar
IndyCar
to reflect the merged series. The new Dallara DW12 racecar was introduced for the 2012 season. IndyCar
IndyCar
collaborated with DreamWorks Animation
DreamWorks Animation
to launch comedy film Turbo in 2013. Bernard was fired in October 2012, and replaced by Mark Miles. Driver safety[edit] Driver safety has also been a major point of concern, with a number of drivers seriously injured, particularly in the early years of the series. There have been five fatal crashes in the history of the series. Compared to road racing venues, the lack of run-offs on oval tracks, coupled with higher speeds due to the long straights and banked turns, means that there is far less margin for error. Car design was attributed as a leading cause of early injuries, and the series made improvements to chassis design to address those safety concerns. Following a series of spectacular high-profile accidents in 2003, including American racing legend Mario Andretti
Mario Andretti
and former champion Kenny Bräck, as well as the death of Tony Renna
Tony Renna
in testing at Indianapolis, the IRL made additional changes to reduce speeds and increase safety. IndyCar
IndyCar
was the first racing series to adopt the SAFER soft wall safety system, which debuted at the Indianapolis
Indianapolis
500 and has now been installed at almost all major oval racing circuits. The SAFER system research and design was supported and funded in large part by the Hulman-George family and the Indianapolis
Indianapolis
Motor Speedway.[citation needed] Fatalities[edit]

Scott Brayton – (May 17, 1996), 1996 Indianapolis
Indianapolis
500 practice session. Tony Renna – (October 22, 2003), Firestone private testing session. Paul Dana – (March 26, 2006), 2006 Toyota Indy 300 practice session. Dan Wheldon – (October 16, 2011), 2011 IZOD IndyCar
IndyCar
World Championship. Justin Wilson – (August 24, 2015), 2015 ABC Supply 500.[8]

Gallery[edit]

Roberto Moreno practicing the 2007 Indianapolis
Indianapolis
500.

A Honda
Honda
engine for 2007 to 2011.

See also[edit]

List of IndyCar
IndyCar
teams List of IndyCar Series
IndyCar Series
racetracks List of American Championship Car Rookie of the Year Winners List of American Championship car racing
American Championship car racing
point scoring systems Indianapolis
Indianapolis
Motor Speedway Indianapolis
Indianapolis
Motor Speedway Radio Network

References[edit]

^ 2011 Las Vegas Accident Information ^ " IndyCar
IndyCar
lands Title Sponsor". IndyStar.com. Archived from the original on November 6, 2009. Retrieved 2009-11-03.  ^ a b " Tony George
Tony George
Makes an Offer for Unity". SpeedTV.com. 2008-01-23. Archived from Tony George
Tony George
Makes an Offer for Unity the original Check url= value (help) on 2008-01-27. Retrieved 2008-01-23.  ^ a b "George off to Japan
Japan
in pursuit of unification". IndyStar.com. 2008-02-09. Archived from the original on 2008-02-18. Retrieved 2008-02-13.  ^ "Official optimistic IRL- Champ Car
Champ Car
merger talks will continue". IndyStar.com. 2008-02-12. Archived from the original on November 6, 2011. Retrieved 2008-02-13.  ^ "Done Deal". IndyCar.com. Archived from the original on 2008-03-13. Retrieved 2010-08-22.  ^ Lewandowski, Dave (2010-02-02). "Meet the CEO". IndyCar
IndyCar
Series. Indy Racing League. Retrieved 2010-02-02.  ^ "AP". 

External links[edit]

Official website IndyCar
IndyCar
at Curlie (based on DMOZ)

v t e

IndyCar
IndyCar
Series

Seasons

1996 1996–97 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Indianapolis
Indianapolis
500

1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Champions

Kenny Bräck Buzz Calkins Scott Dixon
Scott Dixon
(four times) Dario Franchitti
Dario Franchitti
(four times) Sam Hornish Jr.
Sam Hornish Jr.
(three times) Ryan Hunter-Reay Tony Kanaan Buddy Lazier Josef Newgarden Simon Pagenaud Will Power Greg Ray Scott Sharp Tony Stewart Dan Wheldon

Tracks

Ovals

Gateway Indianapolis Iowa Phoenix Pocono Texas

Road courses

Barber Indianapolis Mid-Ohio Road America Sonoma Watkins Glen

Street circuits

Detroit Long Beach St. Petersburg Toronto

Former

Atlanta Baltimore Charlotte Chicagoland Dover Edmonton Fontana Homestead Houston Kansas Kentucky Las Vegas Louisiana Michigan Milwaukee Motegi Nashville Nazareth New Hampshire Pikes Peak Richmond São Paulo Surfers Paradise (exhibition) Walt Disney World

Cancelled

Boston Brasília Qingdao

Road to Indy

Indy Lights Pro Mazda U.S. F2000

History of IndyCar
IndyCar
racing • All-time winners • Races • Drivers • Teams

v t e

American Championship car racing
American Championship car racing
(IndyCar) seasons

AAA

1905 1906–1908 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942–1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955

NASCAR

1952 1953

USAC

1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981–82 1982–83 1983–84 1984–85 1985–86 1986–87 1987–88 1988–89 1989–90 1990–91 1991–92 1992–93 1993–94 1994–95

CART / CCWS

1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

INDYCAR

1996 1996–97 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

Years marked in italics are not official championship years.

v t e

Tracks of the IndyCar
IndyCar
Series

Current

Ovals

Gateway Indianapolis Iowa Phoenix Pocono Texas

Road courses

Barber Indianapolis Mid-Ohio Portland Road America Sonoma

Street circuits

Detroit Long Beach St. Petersburg Toronto

Former

Ovals

Atlanta Charlotte Chicagoland Dover Fontana Homestead Kansas Kentucky Las Vegas Michigan Milwaukee Motegi Nashville Nazareth New Hampshire Pikes Peak Richmond Walt Disney World

Road courses

Motegi NOLA Watkins Glen

Street circuits

Baltimore Edmonton Houston São Paulo Surfers Paradise

v t e

Sirius XM Radio channels

Entertainment

Blue Collar Radio Canada
Canada
Laughs Fox News Radio The Foxxhole Laugh USA Martha Stewart Living Radio Raw Dog Comedy Sirius XM Stars

Family and health

Doctor Radio Kids Place Live Radio Classics Radio Disney

News

BBC World Service Bloomberg Radio CNBC CNN CNN
CNN
en Español C-Span Radio Fox News Channel Fox News Talk HLN MSNBC NPR
NPR
Now POTUS Politics PRX SiriusXM Patriot SiriusXM Progress Sirius XM Public Radio SiriusXM Insight SiriusXM Urban View

Religion

FamilyNet Radio The Catholic Channel EWTN FamilyTalk

Sports

ESPN
ESPN
Radio ESPNU
ESPNU
Radio ESPN
ESPN
Xtra IndyCar
IndyCar
Radio Mad Dog Sports Radio MLB Network Radio NBA Radio NASCAR
NASCAR
Radio NFL Radio The Score XM Scoreboard

Latin

Calendrier Sportif Canada
Canada
360 Canada
Canada
Talks CBC Radio One ESPN
ESPN
Deportes Radio Ici Radio- Canada
Canada
Première Quoi de Neuf Radio Parallèle

Other

America's Talk ATN-Asian Radio Cosmo Radio Extreme Talk Howard 100 Howard 101 Playboy Radio RCI+ ReachMD Road Dog Trucking Sirius XM Indie Sirius XM Weather & Emergency Specials Faction Talk The Weather Network WRN Broadcast

Premium channels

Sirius XM Public Radio Faction Talk OutQ SiriusXM NHL Network Radio SiriusXM PGA Tour Radio

v t e

Classes of auto racing

Formula racing

F1 F2 F3 F4 F500 Formula 1000 Formula Atlantic Formula Car Challenge Formula Continental Formula E Formula Ford FF1600 Formula Libre Formula Vee IndyCar Super Formula Supermodified BOSS GP Monoposto Racing Club

Defunct Formula racing

F3000 F5000 Formula A (SCCA) Formula B (SCCA) Formula C (SCCA) FCJ Formula Dream Formula Holden Formula Junior Formula Mondial Formula Pacific Formula Super Vee Australian National Formula Grand Prix Masters Tasman Formula

One-make formulae

CFGP Formula Abarth Formula Car Challenge Formula LGB

Swift Hyundai

Formula Maruti Formula Masters China Formula Mazda Formula Renault Formula Toyota GP3 Indy Lights SRF USF2000 FIA Formula 2 Championship

Defunct one-make formulae

A1GP ADAC Formel Masters Auto GP Barber Pro FA1 Formula Alfa Formula Asia Formula BMW FC Euro Series Formula König Formula Lightning Formula Nissan Formula Opel/Vauxhall Formula Palmer Audi Formula RUS Formula Rolon Formula SCCA Grand Prix Masters GP2 International Formula Master Superleague Formula World Series Formula V8 3.5

Karting

KF1 KF2 KF3 KZ1 KZ2 Superkart

Touring car racing

DTM WTCR BTCC Group F Group G Group H Super 2000 Diesel 2000 NGTC (TCN-1) TCR (TCN-2) Supercars TC2000

Defunct touring car racing

Appendix J BTC-T Group 1 Group 2 Group 5 Group A Group C
Group C
(Australia) Group E Group N Group N
Group N
(Australia) Group S Class 1 Super Touring
Super Touring
(Class 2) Superstars V8Star WTCC

Stock car racing

ARCA Allison Legacy Series AUSCAR IMCA Sport Compact Late model Legends Modifieds NASCAR

Monster Energy NASCAR
NASCAR
Cup Xfinity Truck Pinty's Whelen Euro Series PEAK Mexico

Super Stock Street Stock Brasil Turismo Carretera

Oval racing

BriSCA F1 BriSCA F2 V8 Hotstox Hot Rods Superstocks Sprint car racing Midget car racing Quarter Midget racing

Rallying

Group R Group R-GT Super 2000 Super 1600 World Rally Car

Defunct rallying

Group 1 Group 2 Group 4 Group A Group B Group N Group S

Sports prototypes

Clubmans DP Group 3 Group 4 Group 5 Group 6 Group 7 Group A
Group A
Sports Cars Group C GC GC-21 Group CN IMSA GTP LMP LMPC S2000

Grand touring

LM GTE (GT2) GT3 GT4 GT500 GT300 Trans-Am Appendix K Group D GT Cars

Defunct grand touring

Group 3 Group 4 Group 5 Group B Group D Production Sports Cars GT1 (1993–99) GT2 (1993–99) FIA GT1 (2000-12) IMSA AAGT IMSA GTO/GTS IMSA GTU IMSA GTX

Drag racing

Top Fuel
Top Fuel
Dragster (TF/D) Top Alcohol
Top Alcohol
Dragster (TA/D) Top Fuel
Top Fuel
Funny Car
Funny Car
(TF/FC) Pro Stock
Pro Stock
(PS) Pro Modified (Pro Mod) Pro FWD Super Comp/Quick Rod Top Doorslammer

Defunct drag racing

Top Gas Modified Altered Competition Super Stock

Off-road racing

Baja Bug Dune buggy Rallycross Trophy Truck Group T4 Truggy Side by Side (UTV)

v t e

Games based on INDYCAR
INDYCAR
(formerly known as CART)

Video games

1970s

Indy 500 (Atari)

1980s

Indianapolis
Indianapolis
500: The Simulation

1990s

ABC Sports Indy Racing Al Unser Jr.'s Road to the Top CART Precision Racing CART World Series Danny Sullivan's Indy Heat Flag to Flag Indy 500 (Sega) IndyCar
IndyCar
Racing IndyCar Racing
IndyCar Racing
II Michael Andretti's Indy Car Challenge Newman/Haas IndyCar
IndyCar
featuring Nigel Mansell

2000s

CART Fury Driven Indianapolis
Indianapolis
500 Evolution Indianapolis
Indianapolis
500 Legends Indy Racing 2000 IndyCar
IndyCar
Series IndyCar Series
IndyCar Series
2005

2010s

Car Town

Pinball

Indianapolis
Indianapolis
500

v t e

ESPN
ESPN
Inc.

Executives

George Bodenheimer Edwin Durso Chuck Pagano Norby Williamson James Pitaro

U.S. networks

Linear TV

ESPN ESPN2 ESPNews Classic ESPNU Deportes Longhorn Network SEC Network

Part-time/Digital

ACC Network Extra ESPN
ESPN
on ABC ESPN3 College Extra Goal Line

Radio

ESPN
ESPN
Radio

Deportes

Xtra

International

Brasil

ESPN ESPN
ESPN
Brasil ESPN
ESPN
+ ESPN
ESPN
Extra

Caribbean

ESPN ESPN
ESPN
2

Indian subcontinent

Sony ESPN

Japan

J Sports

Latin America

ESPN ESPN
ESPN
2 ESPN
ESPN
3 ESPN
ESPN
+ ESPN
ESPN
Extra

Oceania

ESPN ESPN
ESPN
2

Philippines

ESPN
ESPN
5

Sub-Saharan Africa

ESPN

UK and Ireland

BT Sport ESPN

Co-owned Canadian sports networks

TSN

1 2 3 4 5

RDS RDS2 RDS Info ESPN
ESPN
Classic Canada

Ventures

ESPN+ ESPN.com ESPN
ESPN
Deportes.com ESPN
ESPN
Broadband ESPN
ESPN
Events ESPN
ESPN
Films ESPN
ESPN
The Magazine ESPN
ESPN
Deportes La Revista ESPN
ESPN
Books ESPY Awards ESPN
ESPN
Integration WatchESPN

Defunct ventures

ESPN
ESPN
West Arena Football League
Arena Football League
(minority stake, 2006–2009) ESPN
ESPN
Star Sports (equity stake, 1994–2013) ESPN
ESPN
3D (2010–2013) ESPN
ESPN
America (2002–2013) ESPN
ESPN
Classic (UK) (2006–2013) ESPN
ESPN
MVP (2005–2006) Grantland
Grantland
(2011–2015) ESPN
ESPN
GamePlan (1992–2015) ESPN
ESPN
Full Court (2007–2015) ESPN
ESPN
PPV (1999–2015) ESPN
ESPN
HS (1997–2012)

Sports broadcasting rights

ESPN
ESPN
College Football High School Showcase ESPN
ESPN
Major League Baseball ESPN
ESPN
College Basketball MLS Soccer Sunday Monday Night Football CFL on TSN NBA on ESPN WNBA on ESPN List of ESPN
ESPN
sports properties

Other properties

ESPNcricinfo FCS Kickoff FiveThirtyEight Jayski's Silly Season Site ESPN
ESPN
FC ESPNscrum Scouts Inc. TrueHoop The Undefeated

Notable personalities

Current personalities Former personalities ESPNews
ESPNews
personalities ESPNU
ESPNU
personalities ESPN Radio
ESPN Radio
personalities

Miscellaneous

History Criticism This is SportsCenter ESPN
ESPN
Zone ESPN
ESPN
Wide World of Sports Complex

Owners: Disney Media Networks 80% Hear

.