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Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri
is a town in the Agra
Agra
District of Uttar Pradesh, India. The city itself was founded as the capital of Mughal Empire
Mughal Empire
in 1571 by Emperor Akbar, serving this role from 1571 to 1585, when Akbar abandoned it due to a campaign in Punjab and was later completely abandoned in 1610.[1] The name of the city derives from the village called Sikri which occupied the spot before. An Archaeological Survey of India
India
(ASI) excavation from 1999-2000 indicated that there was a habitation here before Akbar
Akbar
built his capital. It was also a much-loved place of Babur
Babur
who called it Shukri for its lake of water needed for his armies. He used it for relaxation and also defeated Rana Sanga
Rana Sanga
on its outskirts. The khanqah of Sheikh Salim existed earlier at this place. Akbar's son Jahangir
Jahangir
was born at the village of Sikri in 1569 and that year Akbar began construction of a religious compound to commemorate the Sheikh who had predicted the birth. After Jahangir's second birthday, he began the construction of a walled city and imperial palace here. The city came to be known as Fatehpur Sikri, the "City of Victory", after Akbar's victorious Gujarat campaign in 1573.

Contents

1 History 2 Architecture 3 Demographics 4 Administration 5 Transport 6 In literature 7 Gallery 8 See also 9 Notes 10 Further reading 11 References 12 External links

History[edit] Basing his arguments on the excavations by the Archaeological Survey of India
India
(ASI) in 1999-2000 at the Chabeli Tila, senior Agra journalist Bhanu Pratap Singh said the antique pieces, statues, and structures all point to a lost "culture and religious site," more than 1,000 years ago. "The excavations yielded a rich crop of Jain statues, hundreds of them, including the foundation stone of a temple with the date. The statues were a thousand years old of Bhagwan Adi Nath, Bhagwan Rishabh Nath, Bhagwan Mahavir and Jain Yakshinis," said Swarup Chandra Jain, senior leader of the Jain community. Historian Sugam Anand states that there is proof of habitation, temples and commercial centres before Akbar
Akbar
established it as his capital. He states that the open space on a ridge was used by Akbar
Akbar
to build his capital.[2][3][4] But preceding Akbar's appropriation of the site for his capital city, his predecessors Babur
Babur
and Humayun
Humayun
did much to redesign Fatehpur Sikri's urban layout.[5] Attilio Petruccioli, a scholar of Islamic architecture and Professor of Landscape Architecture at the Polytechnic University of Bari, Italy, notes that " Babur
Babur
and his successors" wanted to "to get away from the noise and confusion of Agra
Agra
[and] build an uninterrupted sequence of gardens on the free left bank of the Yamuna, linked both by boat and by land."[5] The place was much loved by Babur, who called it Shukri ("Thanks"), after its large lake that was used by Mughal armies.[6] Annette Beveridge in her translation of Baburnama
Baburnama
noted that Babur
Babur
points "Sikri" to read "Shukri".[7] Per his memoirs, Babur
Babur
constructed a garden here called the "Garden of Victory" after defeating Rana Sangha at its outskirts. Gulbadan Begum's Humayun-Nama describes that in the garden he built an octagonal pavilion which he used for relaxation and writing. In the center of the nearby lake, he built a large platform. A baoli exists at the base of a rock scarp about a kilometer from the Hiran Minar. This was probably the original site of a well-known epigraph commemorating his victory.[6] Akbar
Akbar
remained heirless until 1569 when his son, who became known as Jahangir, was born in the village of Sikri in 1569. Akbar
Akbar
began the construction of a religious compound in honor of the Chisti saint Sheikh Salim, who had predicted the birth of Jahangir. After Jahangir's second birthday, he began the construction of a walled city and imperial palace probably to test his son's stamina. By constructing his capital at the khanqah of Sheikh Salim, Akbar associated himself with this popular Sufi
Sufi
order and brought legitimacy to his reign through this affiliation.[8] The city was founded in 1571 and was named after the village of Sikri which occupied the spot before. The Buland Darwaza
Buland Darwaza
was built in honor of his successful campaign in Gujarat, when the city came to be known as Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri
- "The City of Victory". It was named after the Sikri village which had existed on the spot before. It was abandoned by Akbar
Akbar
in 1585 when he went to fight a campaign in Punjab. It was later completely abandoned by 1610.[1] According to contemporary historians, Akbar
Akbar
took a great interest in the building of Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri
and probably also dictated its architectural style. Seeking to revive the splendours of Persian court ceremony made famous by his ancestor Timur, Akbar
Akbar
planned the complex on Persian principles. But the influences of his adopted land came through in the typically Indian embellishments. The easy availability of sandstone in the neighbouring areas of Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri
also meant that all the buildings here were made of the red stone. The Imperial Palace complex consists of a number of independent pavilions arranged in formal geometry on a piece of level ground, a pattern derived from Arab and central Asian tent encampments. In its entirety, the monuments at Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri
thus reflect the genius of Akbar
Akbar
in assimilating diverse regional architectural influences within a holistic style that was uniquely his own.[citation needed] The Imperial complex was abandoned in 1585, shortly after its completion, due to the exhaustion of the small, spring-fed lake that supplied the city with water, and its proximity with the Rajputana, with which the Mughal Empire
Mughal Empire
was often at war. Thus the capital was shifted to Lahore
Lahore
so that Akbar
Akbar
could have a base in the less stable part of the empire, before moving back to Agra
Agra
in 1598, where he had begun his reign as he shifted his focus to Deccan. In fact, he never returned to the city except for a brief period in 1601. In later Mughal history it was occupied for a short while by the Mughal emperor Muhammad Shah
Muhammad Shah
(1719 -1748) and his regent, Sayyid
Sayyid
Hussain Ali Khan Barha, one of the Syed Brothers, was murdered here in 1720. The palaces were occupied by the Marathas after their conquest of Delhi, then transferred to the British army, which used the fortified complex as a headquarters and barracks. Restoration began under Lord Curzon.[citation needed] Because the palace area has been in nearly continuous use over the centuries, much of the imperial complex which spread over nearly two mile long and one mile wide area is largely intact. It is still surrounded by a five mile long wall built during its original construction on three sides. However, apart from the imperial buildings complex and the magnificent mosque which continues in use, little of the city survives. The former site of the city is mostly barren, except of ruins of the bazaars of the old city near the Naubat Khana, the 'drum-house' entrance at Agra
Agra
Road. The modern town lies at the western end of the complex, which was a municipality from 1865 to 1904, and later made a notified area and in 1901 had a population of 7,147. For a long time it was still known for its masons and stone carvers, though in Akbar
Akbar
time it was known and 'fabrics of hair' and 'silk-spinning'. The village of Sikri still exists nearby.[citation needed] Architecture[edit]

General Plan of Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri
City in 1917

Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri
sits on rocky ridge, 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) in length and 1 km (0.62 mi) wide and palace city is surrounded by a 6 km (3.7 mi) wall on three sides with the fourth bordered by a lake. Its architects were R Roy and Dhruv Chawla and was constructed using Indian principles.[citation needed] The buildings of Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri
show a synthesis of various regional schools of architectural craftsmanship such as Gujarat and Bengal.[citation needed] This was because indigenous craftsmen were used for the construction of the buildings.[citation needed] Influences from Hindu and Jain architecture are seen hand in hand with Islamic elements.[citation needed] The building material used in all the buildings at Fatehpur Sikri, palace-city complex, is the locally quarried red sandstone, known as 'Sikri sandstone'. It is accessed through gates along the 5 miles (8.0 km) long fort wall, namely, Delhi Gate, the Lal Gate, the Agra
Agra
Gate and Birbal's Gate, Chandanpal Gate, The Gwalior Gate, the Tehra Gate, the Chor Gate and the Ajmeri Gate.The palace contains summer palace and winter palace for queen jodha.

Jama Masjid, Fatehpur Sikri

Tomb of Salim Chishti
Salim Chishti
in Jama Masjid
Jama Masjid
courtyard, Fatehpur Sikri

Panch Mahal, Fatehpur Sikri

Hiran Minar, Fatehpur Sikri

Some of the important buildings in this city, both religious and secular are:

Buland Darwaza: Set into the south wall of congregational mosque, the Buland Darwaza
Buland Darwaza
at Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri
is 55 metres (180 ft) high, from the outside, gradually making a transition to a human scale in the inside. The gate was added around five years after the completion of the mosque c. 1576-1577 as a victory arch, to commemorate Akbar's successful Gujarat campaign. It carries two inscriptions in the archway, one of which reads: "Isa, Son of Mariam said: The world is a bridge, pass over it, but build no houses on it. He who hopes for an hour may hope for eternity. The world endures but an hour. Spend it in prayer, for the rest is unseen". The central portico comprises three arched entrances, with the largest one, in the centre, is known locally as the Horseshoe Gate, after the custom of nailing horseshoes to its large wooden doors for luck. Outside the giant steps of the Buland Darwaza
Buland Darwaza
to the left is a deep well. Jama Masjid: It is a Jama Mosque
Jama Mosque
meaning the congregational mosque and was perhaps one of the first buildings to be constructed in the complex, as its epigraph gives AH 979 (A.D. 1571-72) as the date of its completion, with a massive entrance to the courtyard, the Buland-Darwaza added some five years later. It was built in the manner of Indian mosques, with iwans around a central courtyard. A distinguishing feature is the row of chhatri over the sanctuary. There are three mihrabs in each of the seven bays, while the large central mihrab is covered by a dome, it is decorated with white marble inlay, in geometric patterns. Tomb of Salim Chishti: A white marble encased tomb of the Sufi
Sufi
saint, Salim Chisti
Salim Chisti
(1478–1572), within the Jama Masjid's sahn, courtyard. The single-storey structure is built around a central square chamber, within which is the grave of the saint, under an ornate wooden canopy encrusted with mother-of-pearl mosaic. Surrounding it is a covered passageway for circumambulation, with carved Jalis, stone pierced screens all around with intricate geometric design and an entrance to the south. The tomb is influenced by earlier mausolea of the early 15th century Gujarat Sultanate
Gujarat Sultanate
period. Other striking features of the tomb are white marble serpentine brackets, which support sloping eaves around the parapet. On the left of the tomb, to the east, stands a red sandstone tomb of Islam Khan I, son of Shaikh Badruddin Chisti and grandson of Shaikh Salim Chishti, who became a general in the Mughal army in the reign of Jahangir. The tomb is topped by a dome and thirty-six small domed chattris and contains a number of graves, some unnamed, all male descendants of Shaikh Salim Chisti. Diwan-i-Aam : Diwan-i-Aam or Hall of Public Audience, is a building typology found in many cities where the ruler meets the general public. In this case, it is a pavilion-like multi-bayed rectangular structure fronting a large open space. South west of the Diwan-i-Am and next to the Turkic Sultana's House stand Turkic Baths. Diwan-i-Khas: the Diwan-i-Khas or Hall of Private Audience, is a plain square building with four chhatris on the roof. However it is famous for its central pillar, which has a square base and an octagonal shaft, both carved with bands of geometric and floral designs, further its thirty-six serpentine brackets support a circular platform for Akbar, which is connected to each corner of the building on the first floor, by four stone walkways. It is here that Akbar
Akbar
had representatives of different religions discuss their faiths and gave private audience. Ibadat Khana: (House of Worship) was a meeting house built in 1575 CE by the Mughal Emperor
Mughal Emperor
Akbar, where the foundations of a new Syncretistic
Syncretistic
faith, Din-e-Ilahi
Din-e-Ilahi
were laid by Akbar. Anup Talao: Anup Talao was built by Raja Anup Singh Sikarwar A ornamental pool with a central platform and four bridges leading up to it. Some of the important buildings of the royal enclave are surround by it including, Khwabgah (House of Dreams) Akbar's residence, Panch Mahal, a five-storey palace, Diwan-i-Khas(Hall of Private Audience), Ankh Michauli and the Astrologer's Seat, in the south-west corner of the Pachisi Court. Hujra-i-Anup Talao: Said to be the residence of Akbar's Muslim wife, although this is disputed due to its small size. Mariam-uz-Zamani's Palace: The building of Akbar's Rajput wives, including Mariam-uz-Zamani, shows Gujarati influence and is built around a courtyard, with special care being taken to ensure privacy. Naubat Khana: Also known as Naqqar Khana
Naqqar Khana
meaning a drum house, where musician used drums to announce the arrival of the Emperor. It is situated ahead of the Hathi Pol Gate or the Elephant Gate, the south entrance to the complex, suggesting that it was the imperial entrance. Pachisi Court: A square marked out as a large board game, the precursor to modern day Ludo game where people served as the playing pieces. Panch Mahal: A five-storied palatial structure, with the tiers gradually diminishing in size, till the final one, which is a single large-domed chhatri. Originally pierced stone screens faced the facade and probably sub-divided the interior as well, suggesting it was built for the ladies of the court. The floors are supported by intricately carved columns on each level, totalling to 176 columns in all. Birbal's House: The house of Akbar's favourite minister, who was a Hindu. Notable features of the building are the horizontal sloping sunshades or chajjas and the brackets which support them. Hiran Minar: The Hiran Minar, or Elephant Tower, is a circular tower covered with stone projections in the form of elephant tusks. Traditionally it was thought to have been erected as a memorial to the Emperor Akbar's favourite elephant. However, it was probably a used as a starting point for subsequent mile posts.[9]

Other buildings included Taksal (mint), Daftar Khana (Records Office), Karkhana (royal workshop), Khazana (Treasury), Hammam (Turkic Baths), Darogha's Quarters, stables, Caravan sarai, Hakim's quarters, etc. Demographics[edit] Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri
has a population of 28,757. Males constitute 53% of the population and females 47%. Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri
has an average literacy rate of 46%, lower than the national average of 74%; male literacy is 57%, and female literacy is 34%. In Fatehpur Sikri, 59% of the population is under 6 years of age. Administration[edit] Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri
is one of the fifteen Block headquarters in the Agra district. It has 52 Gram panchayats(Village Panchayat) under it. The Fatehpur Sikri, is a constituency of the Lok Sabha, Lower house of the Indian Parliament, and further comprises five Vidhan Sabha(legislative assembly) segments:

Agra
Agra
Rural Fatehpur Sikri Kheragarh Fatehabad Bah

In all there are 12 villages of Sisodia
Sisodia
Rajputs near Fatehpur Sikri fort in Agra
Agra
district. These are Daultabad, Nayavas, Satha, Korai, Behrawati, Byara, Undera, Kachora, Singarpur, Vidyapur, Onera, Arrua. Transport[edit] Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri
is about 39 kilometres (24 mi) from Agra. The nearest Airport is Agra
Agra
Airport(also known as Kheria Airport), 40 kilometres (25 mi) from Fatehpur Sikri. The nearest railway station is Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri
railway station, about 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) from the city centre. It is connected to Agra
Agra
and neighbouring centres by road, where regular bus services operated by UPSRTC
UPSRTC
ply, in addition to tourist buses and taxis. In literature[edit]

Wikisource
Wikisource
has original text related to this article: 'Futtypore Sicri', a poem by L. E. L.

In her poem Futtypore Sicri (Fisher's Drawing Room Scrap Book, 1833), Letitia Elizabeth Landon
Letitia Elizabeth Landon
associates its abandonment with 'the revenge of the dead'. Gallery[edit]

Buland Darwaza

Buland Darwaza
Buland Darwaza
back side.

King's Gate

Entrance to Queen's Palace

Diwan-i-Khas

Mariam-uz-Zamani
Mariam-uz-Zamani
House

Anup Talao

See also[edit]

India
India
portal

Lahore
Lahore
Fort Tomb of Jehangir Jama Masjid Tomb of Salim Chishti Ibadat Khana Mariam-uz-Zamani Naubat Khana Buland Darwaza

Notes[edit]

^ a b Andrew Petersen. Dictionary of Islamic Architecture. Routlegde. p. 82.  ^ "Fatehpur Sikri, that Mughal emperor Akbar
Akbar
established as his capital and is now a World Heritage site, was once a "flourishing trade and Jain pilgrimage centre", a new book says.", India
India
Times, 17 July 2013  ^ " Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri
was once a Jain pilgrimage centre: Book", Zee News, 27 February 2013  ^ " Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri
was once a Jain pilgrimage centre", The Free Press Journal, 28 February 2013  ^ a b Petruccioli, Attilio (1984). "The Process Evolved by Control Systems of Urban Design in the Mogul Epoch in India: The Case of Fatehpur Sikri" (PDF). Environmental Design: 18–27 – via ARCHNET.  ^ a b Catherine Ella Blanshard Asher (1992). Architecture of Mughal India, Part 1, Volume. Cambridge University Press. p. 22. ISBN 9780521267281.  ^ Annette Susannah Beveridge (2002). Babur-nama: (Memoirs of Babur). Sang-e-Meel Publications, University of Michigan Press. p. 851. ISBN 9789693512939.  ^ Catherine Ella Blanshard Asher (1992). Architecture of Mughal India, Part 1, Volume 4. Cambridge University Press. pp. 51–53. ISBN 9780521267281.  ^ http://www.bl.uk/onlinegallery/onlineex/apac/photocoll/g/019pho000001003u00568000.html

Further reading[edit]

Latif, Muḥammad (1896). Agra, Historical & Descriptive. Calcutta Central Press.  Fazl, Abul (1897–1939). The Akbarnama (Vol. I-III). Translated by H. Beveridge. Calcutta: Asiatic Society.  Keene, Henry George (1899). "Fatehpur Sikri". A Handbook for Visitors to Agra
Agra
and Its Neighbourhood (Sixth ed.). Thacker, Spink & Co. p. 53.  Malleson, G. B., Colonel (1899). Akbar
Akbar
And The Rise Of The Mughal Empire. Rulers of India
India
series. Oxford at the Clarendon Press.  Havell, E. B. (1904). A handbook to Agra
Agra
and the Taj, Sikandra, Fatehpur-Sikri and the neighbourhood (1904). London: Longmans, Greens & Co.  Garbe, Dr.Richard von (1909). Akbar — Emperor of India. A picture of life and customs from the sixteenth century. Chicago: The Opencourt Publishing Company.  Smith, Vincent Arthur (1917). Akbar
Akbar
the Great Mogul, 1542-1605. Oxford at The Clarendon Press.  Hussain, Muhammad Ashraf (1947). A Guide To Fatehpur Sikri. The Manager, Government of India
India
Press.  Rezavi, S. Ali Nadeem (1998). Exploring Mughal Gardens at Fathpur Sikri. Indian History Congress.  Petruccioli, Attilio (1992). Fatehpur Sikri. Ernst & Sohn.  Rizvi, Athar Abbas (2002). Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri
(World heritage series). Archaeological Survey of India. ISBN 81-87780-09-6.  Rezavi, Syed Ali Nadeem (2002). "Iranian Influence on Medieval Indian Architecture", The Growth of Civilizations in India
India
and Iran. Tulika.  Jain, Kulbhushan (2003). Fatehpur Sikri: where spaces touch perfection. VDG. ISBN 3-89739-363-8.  Rezavi, Dr. Syed Ali Nadeem (2008). Religious Disputation and Imperial Ideology: The Purpose and Location of Akbar's Ibadatkhana. SAGE Publications. 

References[edit]

Havell, E. B. (1904). A handbook to Agra
Agra
and the Taj, Sikandra, Fatehpur-Sikri and the neighbourhood (1904). Longmans, Greens & Co., London.  Smith, Vincent Arthur (1917). Akbar
Akbar
the Great Mogul, 1542-1605. Oxford at The Clarendon Press.  Asher, Catherine Ella Blanshard (1992). "Age of Akbar". Architecture of Mughal India, (Part 1). Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-26728-5.  Fatehpur Sikri, Detailed study Arch Net Digital Library

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Fatehpur Sikri.

Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri
at Archaeological Survey of India An interactive map of Fatehpur Sikri Fatehpur Sikri
Fatehpur Sikri
History 360 degree walkthrough of Fatehpur Sikri

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Tourist attractions in Agra

World Heritage Sites

Agra
Agra
Fort Fatehpur Sikri Taj Mahal

Mughal architecture

Chini Ka Rauza Gyarah Sidi Itmad-Ud-Daulah Mariam's Tomb Sikandra

Mosques

Jama Masjid Moti Masjid

Other religious places

Bateshwar Guru ka Tal Mankameshwar Temple Swamibagh

Shopping

Kinari Bazaar Loha Mandi Raja ki mandi Sadar Bazaar Sanjay Place

Gardens

Mehtab Bagh Paliwal Park Ram Bagh

Wildlife sanctuaries

Keetham Lake National Chambal Wildlife Sanctuary Patna Bird Sanctuary

Fairs

Ram Barat Taj Mahotsav

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World Heritage Sites in India

North

Agra
Agra
Fort The Architectural Work of Le Corbusier Fatehpur Sikri Great Himalayan National Park Humayun's Tomb Keoladeo National Park Khajuraho Group of Monuments Kalka-Shimla Railway Nanda Devi and Valley of Flowers National Parks Qutub Minar and its Monuments Red Fort
Red Fort
Complex Taj Mahal

East

Darjeeling Himalayan Railway Kaziranga National Park Mahabodhi Temple
Mahabodhi Temple
Complex Nalanda Manas Wildlife Sanctuary Sun Temple at Konark Sundarbans National Park Khangchendzonga National Park

South

Great Living Chola Temples Group of Monuments at Hampi Group of Monuments at Mahabalipuram Group of Monuments at Pattadakal Nilgiri Mountain Railway Western Ghats

West

Historic City of Ahmadabad Ajanta Caves Rock Shelters of Bhimbetka Champaner-Pavagadh Archaeological Park Chhatrapati Shivaji
Shivaji
Terminus Churches and convents of Goa Elephanta Caves Ellora Caves Hill Forts of Rajasthan Jantar Mantar of Jaipur Rani ki vav Buddhist Monuments at Sanchi Western Ghats

v t e

Mughal Empire

Emperors

Babur Humayun Akbar Jahangir Shah Jahan Aurangzeb
Aurangzeb
(Alamgir) Muhammad Azam Shah Bahadur Shah I Jahandar Shah Farrukhsiyar Rafi ud-Darajat Shah Jahan
Shah Jahan
II Muhammad Shah Ahmad Shah Bahadur Alamgir II Shah Jahan
Shah Jahan
III Shah Alam II Akbar
Akbar
II Bahadur Shah II

Battles and conflicts

Battle of Panipat (1526) Gujarat conquest Battle of Khanwa Battle of Ghaghra Siege of Sambhal Battle of Panipat (1556) Battle of Thanesar Siege of Chittorgarh Siege of Ranthambore Battle of Tukaroi Battle of Raj Mahal Battle of Haldighati Battle of Bhuchar Mori Siege of Kandahar Mughal–Safavid War (1622–23) Siege of Orchha Mughal–Safavid War (1649–53) Battle of Samugarh Battle of Khajwa Suppression of Tilpat rebellion Ahom–Mughal conflicts Siege of Purandhar Tibet–Ladakh–Mughal War Mughal– Maratha
Maratha
Wars

Siege of Bijapur Siege of Jinji

Child's War Siege of Golconda Battle of Karnal Third Battle of Panipat Battle of Buxar Siege of Delhi

Architecture

Taj Mahal Gardens of Babur Fatehpur Sikri

Tomb of Salim Chishti

Humayun's Tomb Red Fort Lahore
Lahore
Fort Jahangir
Jahangir
Mahal Lalbagh Fort Akbar's Tomb Agra
Agra
Fort Chawk Mosque Shalimar Gardens Achabal Gardens Jahangir's Tomb Bibi Ka Maqbara Badshahi Mosque Shahi Bridge Shah Jahan
Shah Jahan
Mosque, Thatta Sheesh Mahal Sunehri Masjid Tipu Sultan Mosque Wazir Khan Mosque more

Adversaries

Ibrahim Lodi Rana Sanga Sher Shah Suri Hemu Maharana Pratap Malik Ambar Gokula Pratapaditya Shivaji Lachit Borphukan Khushal Khattak Sir Josiah Child Guru Gobind Singh Henry Every Bajirao I Nader Shah Hector Munro

Provinces

Bengal Subah Gujarat Subah

See also

Art Cuisine Culture Flag Gardens Language Military Painting Persians Tribe Weapons Timurid dynasty

family tree

Successor states

Maratha
Maratha
Empire Rajput states Jats Sikh Empire Nawabs of Bengal Awadh Nizam of Hyderabad Carnatic Kingdom of Mysore Rohilkhand

v t e

Agra
Agra
division topics

General

Doab Braj Saman Sanctuary

Mythology, history

Mathura
Mathura
related

Krishna Krishna Janmashtami

Agra
Agra
related

Mughal Empire United Provinces of Agra
Agra
and Oudh

Places of tourist interest

In and around Agra

Taj Mahal Agra
Agra
Fort Fatehpur Sikri Buland Darwaza Tomb of Akbar
Akbar
the Great I'timād-ud-Daulah's Tomb Chini Ka Rauza Tomb of Mariam Zamani Gyarah Sidi Jama Masjid Moti Masjid Mankameshwar Temple Guru ka Tal Ram Bagh Mehtab Bagh Paliwal Park Taj Mahotsav Tourist attractions in Agra

In and around Mathura

Kesava Deo Temple Vrindavan Chandrodaya Mandir Prem Mandir Banke Bihari Temple Krishna Balaram Mandir

Districts

Agra Firozabad Mainpuri Mathura

Rivers, dams, lakes, canals

Yamuna Keetham Lake Agra
Agra
Canal

Languages, people

Braj
Braj
Bhasa Hindustani Khariboli Standard Hindi Urdu Jatav

Transport

National Highway 2 Grand Trunk Road National Highway 3 National Highway 11 National Highway 93

Lok Sabha
Lok Sabha
constituencies

Firozabad Agra Fatehpur Sikri Mathura Mainpuri

See also

Agra district
Agra district
topics Cities and towns in Firozabad district Cities and towns in Mainpuri district Cities and towns in Mathura
Mathura
district Villages in Agra
Agra
district Villages in Firozabad district Villages in Mathura
Mathura
district People from Agra People from Firozabad People from Mainpuri People from Mathura

Other divisions

Aligarh Allahabad Azamgarh Bareilly Basti Chitrakoot Devipatan Faizabad Gorakhpur Jhansi Kanpur Lucknow Meerut Mirzapur Moradabad S

.