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The EuroLeague, also known as the Turkish Airlines
Turkish Airlines
EuroLeague
EuroLeague
for name sponsorship reasons, is the European-wide top-tier level professional basketball club competition that is organized by Euroleague Basketball, since 2000, for eligible European basketball clubs. Introduced in 2000, the competition replaced the FIBA
FIBA
EuroLeague (which was previously called the FIBA
FIBA
European Champions Cup, or simply European Cup), which had been run by FIBA
FIBA
since 1958. For Euroleague Basketball
Basketball
records purposes, the FIBA
FIBA
European Champions Cup and EuroLeague
EuroLeague
are considered to be the same competition, with the change of name being simply a re-branding. EuroLeague
EuroLeague
is one of the most popular professional indoor sports leagues in the world, with an average attendance of 8,472, for league matches in the 2016–17 season. That was the fifth-highest of any professional indoor sports league in the world (the highest outside the United States), and the second-highest of any professional basketball league in the world, only behind the National Basketball Association (NBA). The EuroLeague
EuroLeague
title has been won by 21 different clubs, 13 of which have won the title more than once. The most successful club in the competition is Real Madrid, with nine titles. The current champions are Fenerbahçe, after they defeated Olympiacos, in the 2017 final, to win their first title.

Contents

1 History

1.1 Title sponsorship 1.2 Names of the competition

2 Competition systems

2.1 Tournament systems 2.2 League system

3 Logos 4 Format

4.1 Previous EuroLeague
EuroLeague
formats 4.2 European national domestic league and club rankings 4.3 Arena standards

5 Current clubs 6 Results

6.1 Finals 6.2 Titles by club 6.3 Titles by nation

7 Records

7.1 Statistical leaders 7.2 All-time leaders 7.3 Individual performances

8 EuroLeague
EuroLeague
versus NBA games 9 Media coverage 10 Sponsors 11 See also 12 References 13 External links

History[edit] Main article: FIBA
FIBA
European Champions Cup and EuroLeague
EuroLeague
history The FIBA
FIBA
European Champions Cup was originally established by FIBA
FIBA
and it operated under its umbrella from 1958 until the summer of 2000, concluding with the 1999–00 season. That was when Euroleague Basketball
Basketball
was created.

Euroleague Trophy

FIBA
FIBA
had never trademarked the "EuroLeague" name, even though it had used that name for the competition since 1996. Euroleague Basketball simply appropriated the name, and since FIBA
FIBA
had no legal recourse to do anything about it, it was forced to find a new name for its championship series. Thus, the following 2000–2001 season started with 2 separate top European professional club basketball competitions: the FIBA SuproLeague
FIBA SuproLeague
(previously known as the FIBA EuroLeague) and the brand new Euroleague 2000–01 season. The rift in European professional club basketball initially showed no signs of letting up. Top clubs were also split between the two leagues: Panathinaikos, Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv, CSKA Moscow
Moscow
and Efes Pilsen stayed with FIBA, while Olympiacos, Kinder Bologna, Real Madrid, FC Barcelona, Paf Wennington Bologna, Benetton Treviso, AEK and TAU Cerámica
TAU Cerámica
joined Euroleague Basketball. In May 2001, Europe had two continental champions, Maccabi of the FIBA SuproLeague and Kinder Bologna
Kinder Bologna
of the Euroleague. The leaders of both organizations realized the need to come up with a unified competition. Although only a year old, Euroleague Basketball
Basketball
negotiated from a position of strength and dictated proceedings. FIBA
FIBA
essentially had no choice but to agree to Euroleague Basketball's terms. As a result, European club competition was fully integrated under Euroleague Basketball's umbrella and teams that competed in the FIBA
FIBA
SuproLeague during the 2000–01 season joined it as well. In essence, the authority in European professional basketball was divided over club-country lines. FIBA
FIBA
stayed in charge of national team competitions (like the FIBA
FIBA
EuroBasket, the FIBA
FIBA
World Cup, and the Summer Olympics), while Euroleague Basketball
Basketball
took over the European professional club competitions. From that point on, FIBA's Korać Cup
Korać Cup
and Saporta Cup
Saporta Cup
competitions lasted only one more season before folding, which was when Euroleague Basketball
Basketball
launched the ULEB Cup, now known as the EuroCup. In November 2015, Euroleague Basketball
Basketball
and IMG agreed on 10-year joint venture. Both Euroleague Basketball
Basketball
and IMG will manage the commercial operation, and the management of all global rights covering both media and marketing.[3] The deal was worth €630 million euros guaranteed over 10 years, with projected revenues reaching €900 million euros.[4] Title sponsorship[edit] On 26 July 2010, Turkish Airlines
Turkish Airlines
and Euroleague Basketball
Basketball
announced a €15 million strategic agreement to sponsor the top European basketball competition across the globe. According to the agreement, starting with the 2010–11 season, the top European competition would be named Turkish Airlines
Turkish Airlines
Euroleague Basketball. Similarly, the EuroLeague Final Four
EuroLeague Final Four
would be named the Turkish Airlines
Turkish Airlines
EuroLeague Final Four, whereby the new league title would appear in all media accordingly. This title partnership was set to run for five seasons, with the option of extending it to an additional five.[5][6] On 23 October 2013, Turkish Airlines
Turkish Airlines
and Euroleague Basketball
Basketball
agreed to extend their partnership, up until 2020.[7] Names of the competition[edit]

A EuroLeague
EuroLeague
game in Madrid, in 2009.

FIBA
FIBA
era: (1958–2001)

FIBA
FIBA
European Champions Cup: (1958–1991) FIBA
FIBA
European League (" FIBA
FIBA
Euro League"): (1991–1996) FIBA
FIBA
EuroLeague: (1996–2000)[8] FIBA
FIBA
SuproLeague: (2000–2001)

Euroleague Basketball
Basketball
era: (2000–present)

Euroleague: (2000–2016). EuroLeague: (2016–present).

*There were two separate competitions during the 2000–01 season. The SuproLeague, which was organized by FIBA, and the Euroleague, which was organized by Euroleague Basketball. Competition systems[edit] Tournament systems[edit] The EuroLeague
EuroLeague
operated under a tournament system, from its inaugural 1958 season, through the 2015–16 season.

FIBA
FIBA
European Champions Cup (1958 to 1986–87): The champions of European national domestic leagues, and the then current European Champions Cup title holders (except for the 1986–87 season), competing against each other, played in a tournament system. The league culminated with either a single game final, or a 2-game aggregate score finals (3 games if needed to break a tie). FIBA
FIBA
European Champions Cup (1987–88 to 1990–91): The champions of European national domestic leagues, competing against each other, played in a tournament system. The league culminated with a Final Four. FIBA
FIBA
European League (1991–92 to 1995–96): The champions of the European national domestic leagues, the then current European League title holders, along with some of the other biggest teams from the most important national domestic leagues, played in a tournament system. The league culminated with a Final Four. FIBA
FIBA
EuroLeague
EuroLeague
(1996–97 to 1999–00): The champions of the best European national domestic leagues, along with some of the other biggest teams from the most important national domestic leagues, played in a tournament system. The league culminated with a Final Four. *Euroleague (2000–01): Some of the European national domestic league champions, and some of the runners-up from various national domestic leagues, played in a tournament system. The league culminated with a best of 5 playoff finals. * FIBA SuproLeague
FIBA SuproLeague
(2000–01): Some of the European national domestic league champions, and some of the runners-up from various national domestic leagues, played in a tournament system. The league culminated with a Final Four. Euroleague (2001–02 to 2015–16): The champions of the best European national domestic leagues, along with some of the other biggest teams from the most important national domestic leagues, played in a tournament system. The league culminated with a Final Four.

*There were two separate competitions during the 2000–01 season. The SuproLeague, which was organized by FIBA, and the Euroleague, which was organized by Euroleague Basketball. League system[edit] Starting with the 2016–17 season, the EuroLeague
EuroLeague
operates under a league system.

EuroLeague
EuroLeague
(2016–17 to present): The champions of the best European national domestic leagues, along with some of the other biggest teams from the most important national domestic leagues, playing in a true European-wide league system format. The league culminates with a Final Four.

Logos[edit]

Evolution of the EuroLeague
EuroLeague
logo

2000–2005 2005–2010 2010–2016 2016–present

Format[edit]

The setting of the 2014 EuroLeague
EuroLeague
Final Four, in Milan.

Starting with the 2016–17 season, the EuroLeague
EuroLeague
uses a true European-wide basketball league system. Featuring 16 teams, which each play each other twice, once at home and once away, in a true league style regular season format, totaling 30 games. The top 8 placed teams at the end of the regular season advance to the playoffs, which are held as four individual 5 game playoff series. The higher placed team in the regular season standings of each playoff match up has home-court advantage in each playoff series, playing 3 out of the 5 games at home. The winners of each of the four playoff series advance to the Final Four, which is held at a predetermined site. The Final Four features two semifinals games, a third place game, and the championship game. Each team plays a maximum 37 games per season, versus 31 in the previous tournament format. Currently, 11 out of the 16 EuroLeague
EuroLeague
places are held by licensed clubs that have long-term licenses with Euroleague Basketball, and are members of the Shareholders Executive Board. These eleven licensed clubs are currently:

Anadolu Efes Baskonia CSKA Moscow FC Barcelona

   

Fenerbahçe Maccabi Tel Aviv Olimpia Milano Olympiacos

   

Panathinaikos Real Madrid Žalgiris

The remaining 5 EuroLeague
EuroLeague
places are held by associated clubs that have annual licences. These five associated clubs are awarded through one place going to the winner of the previous season's European-wide 2nd-tier level league, the EuroCup, with the last 4 remaining EuroLeague
EuroLeague
places going to a combination of European national domestic league winners and wild cards. Previous EuroLeague
EuroLeague
formats[edit] Main article: EuroLeague
EuroLeague
historical league formats European national domestic league and club rankings[edit] Main articles: European national basketball league rankings
European national basketball league rankings
and European professional basketball club rankings Arena standards[edit] Effective as of the 2012–13 season, EuroLeague
EuroLeague
clubs with what was at the time an "A License" had to host their home EuroLeague
EuroLeague
games in arenas that have a seating capacity of at least 10,000 people. This same minimum 10,000 seat arena capacity rule, now currently applies to all EuroLeague
EuroLeague
clubs with a long-term license. Previously, in 2008, the Euroleague Basketball
Basketball
had originally decided to increase the minimum arena seating requirement to 10,000, within four years time, in order to force EuroLeague
EuroLeague
clubs to move into and/or build bigger arenas. This was done in hopes of increasing revenues through more ticket sales. Conversely, associated clubs, must currently play in arenas that seat at least 5,000 people. Current clubs[edit] These are the teams that participate in the 2017–18 EuroLeague season:

Anadolu Efes

Baskonia

Brose Bamberg

Crvena zvezda

CSKA Moscow

AX Milan

FCB Lassa

Fenerbahçe

Khimki

Maccabi FOX

Olympiacos

Panathinaikos

Madrid

Unicaja

Valencia

Žalgiris

Location of teams in 2017–18 EuroLeague

Team Home city Arena Capacity

Anadolu Efes Istanbul Sinan Erdem Dome[9] 7004160000000000000♠16,000

AX Armani Exchange Olimpia Milan Mediolanum Forum 7004127000000000000♠12,700[10]

Baskonia Vitoria-Gasteiz Fernando Buesa Arena 7004155040000000000♠15,504[11]

Brose Bamberg Bamberg Brose Arena 7003615000000000000♠6,150[12][13]

Crvena zvezda mts Belgrade Štark Arena 7004183860000000000♠18,386[14]

Aleksandar Nikolić[a] 7003587800000000000♠5,878[15]

CSKA Moscow Moscow Megasport Arena 7004133440000000000♠13,344[16]

FC Barcelona
Barcelona
Lassa Barcelona Palau Blaugrana 7003758500000000000♠7,585[17]

Fenerbahçe Doğuş Istanbul Ülker Sports Arena 7004130590000000000♠13,059

Khimki Khimki Mytishchi Arena 7003728000000000000♠7,280

Maccabi FOX Tel Aviv Tel Aviv Menora Mivtachim Arena 7004110600000000000♠11,060[18]

Olympiacos Piraeus Peace and Friendship Stadium 7004116400000000000♠11,640[19]

Panathinaikos Superfoods Athens Olympic Sports Center Athens 7004189890000000000♠18,989[20]

Real Madrid Madrid WiZink Center 7004150000000000000♠15,000[21]

Unicaja Málaga Martín Carpena 7004113000000000000♠11,300[22]

Valencia
Valencia
Basket Valencia Fuente de San Luis 7003850000000000000♠8,500[23]

Žalgiris Kaunas Žalgirio Arena 7004155520000000000♠15,552[24]

Notes

^ The Aleksandar Nikolić was being used as back-up arena by Crvena zvezda, in case the Štark Arena
Štark Arena
was not available.

Results[edit] Finals[edit] Main articles: EuroLeague Finals
EuroLeague Finals
and EuroLeague
EuroLeague
Final Four

Year

Final

Third and fourth place

Champion Score Second place

1958 Details

Rīgas ASK 170–152 (86–81 / 71–84)

Academic Honvéd and Real Madrid

1958–59 Details

Rīgas ASK 148–125 (79–58 / 67–69)

Academic Lech Poznań and OKK Beograd

1959–60 Details

Rīgas ASK 130–113 (51–61 / 69–62)

Dinamo Tbilisi Polonia Warszawa and Slovan Orbis Praha

1960–61 Details

CSKA Moscow 148–128 (87–62 / 66–61)

Rīgas ASK Real Madrid
Madrid
and Steaua București

1961–62 Details

Dinamo Tbilisi 90–83

Real Madrid AŠK Olimpija
AŠK Olimpija
and CSKA Moscow

1962–63 Details

CSKA Moscow 259–240 (86–69 / 91–74 / 99–80)

Real Madrid Dinamo Tbilisi and Spartak ZJŠ Brno

1963–64 Details

Real Madrid 183–174 (110–99 / 84–64)

Spartak ZJŠ Brno OKK Beograd
OKK Beograd
and Simmenthal Milano

1964–65 Details

Real Madrid 157–150 (88–81 / 76–62)

CSKA Moscow Ignis Varese
Ignis Varese
and OKK Beograd

1965–66 Details

Simmenthal Milano 77–72

Slavia VŠ Praha

CSKA Moscow

AEK

1966–67 Details

Real Madrid 91–83

Simmenthal Milano

AŠK Olimpija

Slavia VŠ Praha

1967–68 Details

Real Madrid 98–95

Spartak ZJŠ Brno Simmenthal Milano
Simmenthal Milano
and Zadar

1968–69 Details

CSKA Moscow 103–99 (2 OT's)

Real Madrid Spartak ZJŠ Brno and Standard Liège

1969–70 Details

Ignis Varese 79–74

CSKA Moscow Real Madrid
Madrid
and Slavia VŠ Praha

1970–71 Details

CSKA Moscow 67–53

Ignis Varese Real Madrid
Madrid
and Slavia VŠ Praha

1971–72 Details

Ignis Varese 70–69

Jugoplastika Real Madrid
Madrid
and Panathinaikos

1972–73 Details

Ignis Varese 71–66

CSKA Moscow Crvena zvezda and Simmenthal Milano

1973–74 Details

Real Madrid 84–82

Ignis Varese Berck and Radnički Belgrade

1974–75 Details

Ignis Varese 79–66

Real Madrid Berck and Zadar

1975–76 Details

Mobilgirgi Varese 81–74

Real Madrid ASVEL and Forst Cantù

1976–77 Details

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv 78–77

Mobilgirgi Varese

CSKA Moscow

Real Madrid

1977–78 Details

Real Madrid 75–67

Mobilgirgi Varese

ASVEL

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

1978–79 Details

Bosna 75–67

Emerson Varese

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

Real Madrid

1979–80 Details

Real Madrid 89–85

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

Bosna

Sinudyne Bologna

1980–81 Details

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv 80–79

Sinudyne Bologna

Nashua EBBC

Bosna

1981–82 Details

Squibb Cantù 86–80

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

Partizan

FC Barcelona

1982–83 Details

Ford Cantù 69–68

Billy Milano

Real Madrid

CSKA Moscow

1983–84 Details

Banco di Roma Virtus 79–73

FC Barcelona

Jollycolombani Cantù

Bosna

1984–85 Details

Cibona 87–78

Real Madrid

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

CSKA Moscow

1985–86 Details

Cibona 94–82

Žalgiris

Simac Milano

Real Madrid

1986–87 Details

Tracer Milano 71–69

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

Orthez

Zadar

1987–88 Details

Tracer Milano 90–84

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

Partizan

Aris

1988–89 Details

Jugoplastika 75–69

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

Aris

FC Barcelona

1989–90 Details

Jugoplastika 72–67

FC Barcelona

Limoges CSP

Aris

1990–91 Details

Pop 84 70–65

FC Barcelona

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

Scavolini Pesaro

1991–92 Details

Partizan 71–70

Montigalà Joventut

Philips Milano

Estudiantes Caja Postal

1992–93 Details

Limoges CSP 59–55

Benetton Treviso

PAOK

Real Madrid
Madrid
Teka

1993–94 Details

7up Joventut 59–57

Olympiacos

Panathinaikos

FC Barcelona
Barcelona
Banca Catalana

1994–95 Details

Real Madrid
Madrid
Teka 73–61

Olympiacos

Panathinaikos

Limoges CSP

1995–96 Details

Panathinaikos 67–66

FC Barcelona
Barcelona
Banca Catalana

CSKA Moscow

Real Madrid
Madrid
Teka

1996–97 Details

Olympiacos 73–58

FC Barcelona
Barcelona
Banca Catalana

Smelt Olimpija

ASVEL

1997–98 Details

Kinder Bologna 58–44

AEK

Benetton Treviso

Partizan

1998–99 Details

Žalgiris 82–74

Kinder Bologna

Olympiacos

Teamsystem Bologna

1999–00 Details

Panathinaikos 73–67

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

Efes Pilsen

FC Barcelona

2000–01 Details

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv 81–67

Panathinaikos

Efes Pilsen

CSKA Moscow

2000–01 Details

Kinder Bologna 3–2 play-off

TAU Cerámica AEK and Paf Wennington Bologna

2001–02 Details

Panathinaikos 89–83

Kinder Bologna Benetton Treviso and Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

2002–03 Details

FC Barcelona 76–65

Benetton Treviso

Montepaschi Siena

CSKA Moscow

2003–04 Details

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv 118–74

Skipper Bologna

CSKA Moscow

Montepaschi Siena

2004–05 Details

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv 90–78

TAU Cerámica

Panathinaikos

CSKA Moscow

2005–06 Details

CSKA Moscow 73–69

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

TAU Cerámica

Winterthur FC Barcelona

2006–07 Details

Panathinaikos 93–91

CSKA Moscow

Unicaja

TAU Cerámica

2007–08 Details

CSKA Moscow 91–77

Maccabi Elite Tel Aviv

Montepaschi Siena

TAU Cerámica

2008–09 Details

Panathinaikos 73–71

CSKA Moscow

Regal FC Barcelona

Olympiacos

2009–10 Details

Regal FC Barcelona 86–68

Olympiacos

CSKA Moscow

Partizan

2010–11 Details

Panathinaikos 78–70

Maccabi Electra Tel Aviv

Montepaschi Siena

Real Madrid

2011–12 Details

Olympiacos 62–61

CSKA Moscow

FC Barcelona
Barcelona
Regal

Panathinaikos

2012–13 Details

Olympiacos 100–88

Real Madrid

CSKA Moscow

FC Barcelona
Barcelona
Regal

2013–14 Details

Maccabi Electra Tel Aviv 98–86 (OT)

Real Madrid

FC Barcelona

CSKA Moscow

2014–15 Details

Real Madrid 78–59

Olympiacos

CSKA Moscow

Fenerbahçe Ülker

2015–16 Details

CSKA Moscow 101–96 (OT)

Fenerbahçe

Lokomotiv Kuban

Laboral Kutxa

2016–17 Details

Fenerbahçe 80–64

Olympiacos

CSKA Moscow

Real Madrid

Titles by club[edit] Further information: FIBA
FIBA
European Champions Cup and EuroLeague records and statistics and EuroLeague
EuroLeague
clubs performance comparison

Rank Club Titles Runner-up Champion Years

1. Real Madrid 9 8 1963–64, 1964–65, 1966–67, 1967–68, 1973–74, 1977–78, 1979–80, 1994–95, 2014–15

2. CSKA Moscow 7 6 1960–61, 1962–63, 1968–69, 1970–71, 2005–06, 2007–08, 2015–16

3. Maccabi Tel Aviv 6 9 1976–77, 1980–81, 2000–01, 2003–04, 2004–05, 2013–14

4. Panathinaikos 6 1 1995–96, 1999–00, 2001–02, 2006–07, 2008–09, 2010–11

5. Varese 5 5 1969–70, 1971–72, 1972–73, 1974–75, 1975–76

6. Olympiacos 3 5 1996–97, 2011–12, 2012–13

7. Olimpia Milano 3 2 1965–66, 1986–87, 1987–88

8. Rīgas ASK 3 1 1958, 1958–59, 1959–60

- Split 3 1 1988–89, 1989–90, 1990–91

10. FC Barcelona 2 5 2002–03, 2009–10

11. Virtus Bologna 2 3 1997–98, 2000–01

12. Cantù 2

1981–82, 1982–83

- Cibona 2

1984–85, 1985–86

14. Dinamo Tbilisi 1 1 1961–62

- Joventut 1 1 1993–94

- Žalgiris 1 1 1998–99

- Fenerbahçe 1 1 2016–17

18. Bosna 1

1978–79

- Virtus Roma 1

1983–84

- Partizan 1

1991–92

- Limoges 1

1992–93

22. Academic

2

- Brno

2

- Treviso

2

- Baskonia

2

26. USK Praha

1

- AEK Athens

1

- Fortitudo Bologna

1

Titles by nation[edit]

Rank Country Titles Runners-up

1. Italy 13 Varese (5), Olimpia Milano (3), Cantù (2), Virtus Bologna (2), Virtus Roma (1) 13 Varese (5), Virtus Bologna (3), Olimpia Milano (2), Treviso (2), Fortitudo Bologna (1)

2.

12 Real Madrid
Madrid
(9), FC Barcelona
Barcelona
(2), Joventut (1) 16 Real Madrid
Madrid
(8), FC Barcelona
Barcelona
(5), Baskonia (2), Joventut (1)

3. Greece 9 Panathinaikos (6), Olympiacos (3) 7 Olympiacos (5), AEK (1), Panathinaikos (1)

4. Soviet Union 8 CSKA Moscow
Moscow
(4), Rīgas ASK
Rīgas ASK
(3), Dinamo Tbilisi (1) 6 CSKA Moscow
Moscow
(3), Dinamo Tbilisi (1), Rīgas ASK
Rīgas ASK
(1), Žalgiris (1)

5. Yugoslavia 7 Split (3), Cibona (2), Bosna (1), Partizan (1) 1 Split (1)

6. Israel 6 Maccabi Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv
(6) 9 Maccabi Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv
(9)

7. Russia 3 CSKA Moscow
Moscow
(3) 3 CSKA Moscow
Moscow
(3)

8. Turkey 1 Fenerbahçe (1) 1 Fenerbahçe (1)

9.  France 1 Limoges CSP
Limoges CSP
(1)

- Lithuania 1 Žalgiris (1)

11. Czechoslovakia

3 Brno (2), USK Praha
USK Praha
(1)

12. Bulgaria

2 Academic (2)

Records[edit]

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See also: EuroLeague
EuroLeague
records

Real Madrid
Madrid
has been the most successful team, having won the competition a record nine times. Split (1988–89, 1989–90, 1990–91), is the only team to have won the competition three times in a row, in the modern EuroLeague
EuroLeague
Final Four era (1987–88 season to present). Rīgas ASK, as a Soviet League club in the late 1950s and early 1960s (1958, 1958–59, 1959–60), is the only team to have won the competition three times in a row, in the pre- EuroLeague
EuroLeague
Final Four era. Real Madrid
Madrid
(1963–64, 1964–65) & (1966–67, 1967–68), along with Varese (1971–72, 1972–73) & (1974–75, 1975–76), are the only teams to have won the European Championship twice in a row, on two separate occasions, in the pre-modern EuroLeague
EuroLeague
Final Four era. Cantù (1981–82, 1982–83), Cibona (1984–85, 1985–86), and Olimpia Milano (1986–87, 1987–88), are the other three teams to have won the European Championship twice in a row (only for one time), in the pre-modern EuroLeague Final Four
EuroLeague Final Four
era. Maccabi Tel Aviv
Tel Aviv
(2003–04, 2004–05), and Olympiacos (2011–12, 2012–13), are the only teams to have won the EuroLeague
EuroLeague
twice in a row, becoming back-to-back EuroLeague
EuroLeague
champions in the Euroleague Basketball
Basketball
era (2000–01 season to present). Istanbul
Istanbul
is the only city, from which nine different clubs have played in the competition: Beşiktaş, Darüşşafaka, Eczacıbaşı, Efes, Fenerbahçe, Galatasaray, Istanbul
Istanbul
Technical University, Modaspor, and Ülker have participated in the EuroLeague, followed by Athens, with seven different clubs: AEK, Maroussi, Olympiacos, Panathinaikos, Panellinios, Panionios, and Peristeri. Although Israel
Israel
is located in the Middle East, its teams play in the EuroLeague, as its national federation is a member of FIBA Europe
FIBA Europe
and its top professional league is a member of ULEB. (Similarly, the Israel
Israel
Football Association is a member of UEFA, enabling its national team and clubs to play in UEFA
UEFA
competitions.) In the small area of less than 40 km² (25 mi²) in the northern metropolitan area of Milan, there are 3 clubs that have won a total of 10 FIBA
FIBA
European Champions' Cups, and played in a total of 16 finals: Olimpia Milano, Cantù, and Varese. The record score differential for a EuroLeague Finals
EuroLeague Finals
game was achieved at the 2004 Finals, in Tel Aviv, where the home club, Maccabi Elite, defeated Skipper Bologna, by a score of 118–74 (a 44-point difference). A crowd of 22,567, which filled Belgrade
Belgrade
Arena on 5 March 2009, for a 2008–09 season Top 16 game between Partizan and Panathinaikos is the league's official all seated attendance record.[25] Before that, a crowd of 19,700 all seated fans occurred at a Panathinaikos home game at the Olympic Indoor Hall, in Athens, against TAU Cerámica, on 12 April 2006, during the 2005–06 third quarterfinal playoff game. The most points ever scored in a single game in the league is 99 points, by Radivoj Korać
Radivoj Korać
of OKK Beograd, on January 14, 1965, during the 1964–65 season, in a game against Alvik.[26] The most points ever scored in a single EuroLeague Finals
EuroLeague Finals
game is 47 points, in the 1978–79 season, by Žarko Varajić of Bosna, in a game against Emerson Varese, on April 5, 1979.[27]

Statistical leaders[edit] See also: EuroLeague
EuroLeague
individual statistics All-time leaders[edit] Main article: EuroLeague
EuroLeague
career stats leaders since the 2000–01 season Since the beginning of the 2000–01 season (Euroleague Basketball era):

Average Accumulated

Points Alphonso Ford 22.22 Juan Carlos Navarro 4,133

Rebounds Joseph Blair 10.05 Felipe Reyes 1,705

Assists Shane Larkin 5.67 Dimitris Diamantidis 1,255

Steals Manu Ginóbili 2.73 Dimitris Diamantidis 434

Blocks Ekpe Udoh 2.22 Fran Vázquez 249

Index Rating Anthony Parker 21.41 Juan Carlos Navarro 3,882

Individual performances[edit] Main article: EuroLeague
EuroLeague
individual highs EuroLeague
EuroLeague
versus NBA games[edit] Main article: EuroLeague
EuroLeague
versus NBA games Media coverage[edit] Main article: List of EuroLeague
EuroLeague
broadcasters The EuroLeague
EuroLeague
season is broadcast on television, and can be seen in up to 201 countries and territories.[28] It can be seen by up to 245 million (800 million via satellite) households weekly in China.[29] It is also televised in the United States
United States
and Canada on NBA TV, and available online through ESPN3
ESPN3
(in English) and ESPN Deportes
ESPN Deportes
(in Spanish). The EuroLeague Final Four
EuroLeague Final Four
is broadcast on television in up to 213 countries and territories.[30] The EuroLeague
EuroLeague
also has its own internet pay TV service, called EuroLeague
EuroLeague
TV. Sponsors[edit]

Title sponsor

Turkish Airlines

Premium partners

7DAYS Adidas Tempobet (only in Germany) FONBET (only in Russia) Nesine (only in Turkey) betfair (only in Spain) sportingbet (only in Greece)

Global partners

VODA VODA viagogo Detur Upper Deck DraftKings Kyocera VTB Arena
VTB Arena
Park VTB AX Armani Exchange Intersport Spalding Tadim

Regional partners

Odeabank (only in Turkey) Head & Shoulders (only in Turkey) SEK (only in Turkey) Oscar Mayer
Oscar Mayer
(only in Spain) Endesa
Endesa
(only in Spain) youwin.tv

Global partners of the Final Four

Efes Acıbadem

Source:[31][32][33][34][35][36] See also[edit]

Basketball
Basketball
portal

50 Greatest EuroLeague
EuroLeague
Contributors (2008) EuroLeague
EuroLeague
Awards EuroLeague
EuroLeague
Basketball
Basketball
2001–10 All-Decade Team Euroleague Basketball
Basketball
Manager EuroLeague
EuroLeague
Finals EuroLeague
EuroLeague
Final Four EuroLeague
EuroLeague
Women European Cup and EuroLeague records
EuroLeague records
and statistics European national basketball league rankings FIBA
FIBA
European Champions Cup and EuroLeague
EuroLeague
history FIBA
FIBA
EuroStars FIBA
FIBA
Festival Rosters of the top basketball teams in European club competitions NBA 2K14

References[edit]

^ "Champions Cup 1958". linguasprt. Retrieved 22 March 2017.  ^ " ULEB History". ULEB. Retrieved 2 January 2017.  ^ "Euroleague Basketball
Basketball
A-licence clubs and IMG agree on 10-year joint venture". Euroleague Basketball. 10 November 2015.  ^ 630 millions guaranteed by IMG. ^ " Turkish Airlines
Turkish Airlines
And Euroleague Basketball
Basketball
Sign Strategic Partnership Agreememt" (Press release). Euroleague Basketball. 28 July 2010. Retrieved 29 July 2010.  ^ "An important strategic partnership agreement between Turkish Airlines and Euroleague Basketball..." (Press release). Turkish Airlines. 26 July 2010. Retrieved 29 July 2010.  ^ "Turkish Airlines, Euroleague Basketball
Basketball
Cement Partnership Through 2020". turkishairlines.com. 23 October 2013. Retrieved 20 May 2015.  ^ THE EUROPEAN CUP FOR MEN'S CHAMPION CLUBS - THE EARLY YEARS ^ ANADOLU EFES ISTANBUL Arena: SINAN ERDEM DOME. ^ "CHI SIAMO". MediolanumForum.it. Retrieved 3 December 2016.  ^ "Sports Competitions". buesa-arena.com. Retrieved 6 November 2016.  ^ Attendance: 6150. Archived 2017-01-12 at the Wayback Machine. ^ 6150. ^ KOMBANK ARENA. ^ ALEKSANDAR NIKOLIC 6500. ^ About Megasport (in Russian) ^ " Palau Blaugrana
Palau Blaugrana
- FC Barcelona". FC Barcelona. Retrieved 4 June 2017.  ^ Attendance: 11,060. ^ " Peace and Friendship Stadium
Peace and Friendship Stadium
- Olympiacos BC". olympiacosbc.gr. Retrieved 4 June 2017.  ^ "Olympic Sports Hall". stadia.gr. Retrieved 29 June 2017.  ^ "WiZink Center Real Madrid
Madrid
Basketball
Basketball
Arena Real Madrid Basketball". Real Madrid. Retrieved 1 January 2017.  ^ Palacio de Deportes, datos de interés (in Spanish). ^ "Pabellón". Valencia
Valencia
Basket. Retrieved 15 May 2016.  ^ "Žalgirio arena - About Žalgirio arena". zalgirioarena.lt. Retrieved 4 June 2017.  ^ "Partizan sets crowd record at Belgrade
Belgrade
Arena!". Euroleague.net. 5 March 2009. Retrieved 6 March 2009.  ^ Euroleague.net Radivoj Korac's 99 points. ^ European club champions: 1958-2014. ^ Fenerbahce- Madrid
Madrid
Game of Week sets new TV reach record. ^ "– CSPN China to broadcast Turkish Airlines
Turkish Airlines
Euroleague". Euroleague.net. 16 December 2010.  ^ Record broadcast reach for 2017 Final Four! ^ "Global – Marketing Partners". Euroleague Basketball. Retrieved 4 November 2017.  ^ " Germany
Germany
– Marketing Partners". Euroleague Basketball. Retrieved 4 November 2017.  ^ " Russia
Russia
– Marketing Partners". Euroleague Basketball. Retrieved 4 November 2017.  ^ " Turkey
Turkey
– Marketing Partners". Euroleague Basketball. Retrieved 4 November 2017.  ^ " Spain
Spain
– Marketing Partners". Euroleague Basketball. Retrieved 4 November 2017.  ^ " Greece
Greece
– Marketing Partners". Euroleague Basketball. Retrieved 4 November 2017. 

External links[edit]

Official website List of Winners with Rosters EuroLeague
EuroLeague
history – stats InterBasket.net EuroLeague
EuroLeague
basketball forum EuroLeague's Youtube channel

v t e

FIBA
FIBA
European Champions Cup and Euroleague Basketball

FIBA
FIBA
European Champions Cup era, 1958–2001

Seasons

1958 1958–59 1959–60 1960–61 1961–62 1962–63 1963–64 1964–65 1965–66 1966–67 1967–68 1968–69 1969–70 1970–71 1971–72 1972–73 1973–74 1974–75 1975–76 1976–77 1977–78 1978–79 1979–80 1980–81 1981–82 1982–83 1983–84 1984–85 1985–86 1986–87 1987–88 1988–89 1989–90 1990–91 1991–92 1992–93 1993–94 1994–95 1995–96 1996–97 1997–98 1998–99 1999–2000 2000–01

Finals

1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001

Euroleague Basketball
Basketball
era, 2000–present

Seasons

2000–01 2001–02 2002–03 2003–04 2004–05 2005–06 2006–07 2007–08 2008–09 2009–10 2010–11 2011–12 2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2018–19

Finals

2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

General information

History

Euroleague Basketball Tournament history

Historical formats

EuroLeague
EuroLeague
American Tour EuroLeague
EuroLeague
TV NBA vs. EuroLeague Next Generation Tournament Youngest players Winning coaches

Awards

EuroLeague
EuroLeague
Basketball
Basketball
Awards FIBA SuproLeague
FIBA SuproLeague
Awards FIBA
FIBA
All-Star Games FIBA
FIBA
EuroStars All-Final Four Team Final Four MVP EuroLeague
EuroLeague
Legends 50 Greatest Contributors 2001–10 All-Decade Team

Statistics

Finals Final Four Arenas Team records and statistics EuroLeague
EuroLeague
records Final Four records Individual statistics Individual highs Performance Index Rating Career stats leaders Rosters of finalists EuroLeague
EuroLeague
clubs performance comparison European club pyramid National league rankings European club rankings

Book Category Multimedia

v t e

Basketball
Basketball
in Europe

Organizations

FIBA
FIBA
Europe ULEB Euroleague Basketball

Tournaments for nations

Men

EuroBasket Small Countries Under-20

Division B

Under-18

Division B Division C

Under-16

Division B Division C

Women

EuroBasket
EuroBasket
Women Small Countries Under-20 Under-18 Under-16

Tournaments for clubs

Men

EuroLeague EuroCup Champions League FIBA Europe
FIBA Europe
Cup Next Generation Tournament

Women

EuroLeague EuroCup FIBA Europe
FIBA Europe
SuperCup

Defunct club competitions

EuroChallenge FIBA
FIBA
EuroCup Challenge FIBA
FIBA
Korać Cup Ronchetti Cup FIBA
FIBA
Saporta Cup European Basketball
Basketball
Club Super Cup FIBA
FIBA
SuproLeague FIBA
FIBA
International Christmas Tournament

Awards

FIBA Europe
FIBA Europe
Men's Player of the Year Award FIBA Europe
FIBA Europe
Young Men's Player of the Year Award FIBA Europe
FIBA Europe
Women's Player of the Year Award FIBA Europe
FIBA Europe
Young Women's Player of the Year Award

v t e

European sport club competitions

Football

UEFA
UEFA
competitions

Men

Champions League Europa League Super Cup Youth League

Women

Champions League

Football variants

Futsal

Futsal Cup

Beach soccer

Euro Winners Cup Women's Euro Winners Cup

Basketball

Men

EuroLeague EuroCup Champions League FIBA Europe
FIBA Europe
Cup

Women

EuroLeague EuroCup SuperCup

Volleyball

Men

Champions League CEV Cup Challenge Cup

Women

Champions League CEV Cup Challenge Cup

Handball

Men

Champions League EHF Cup Challenge Cup

Women

Champions League EHF Cup Challenge Cup

Water polo

Men

Champions League Euro Cup Super Cup

Women

Euro League LEN Trophy Super Cup

Rugby union

Men

European Rugby Champions Cup European Rugby Challenge Cup European Rugby Continental Shield

Ice hockey

Men

Champions Hockey League Continental Cup

Women

Champions Cup

Field hockey

Men

Euro Hockey League Trophy Challenge

Women

Champions Cup Trophy Challenge Cup Winners Cup

Roller hockey

Men

European League CERS Cup Continental Cup

Women

European Cup

Table tennis

Men and women

Champions League ETTU Cup

Badminton

Mixed

Europe Cup

Baseball

Men

European Cup

Softball

Men

European Cup Cup Winners Cup

Women

European Cup Cup Winners Cup

Mixed

Super Cup

Korfball

Mixed

Korfball
Korfball
Europa Cup

American football

Men

BIG6 European Football League European Football League EFAF Cup EFAF Challenge Cup EFAF Atlantic Cup

Athletics

Men and women

Champion Clubs Cup Champion Clubs Cup Cross Country

Chess

Men

European Chess
Chess
Club Cup

Women

European Chess
Chess
Club Cup

Rugby League

Men

European Super League

v t e

Men's professional basketball leagues

FIBA National Basketball
Basketball
Association NBA vs international teams FIBA
FIBA
Intercontinental Cup

Africa

Algeria Angola

2nd

Central African Republic Egypt Liberia Libya Morocco Mozambique Nigeria Rwanda Senegal South Africa Tunisia Uganda

Americas

Argentina

2nd

Bolivia Brazil

LDB

Canada Chile Colombia Cuba Dominican Republic Ecuador Mexico

CIBACOPA

Nicaragua Panama Paraguay Peru Puerto Rico United States

NBA G League

Uruguay Venezuela

Asia

Bahrain China

NBL

Hong Kong India Indonesia Iran Iraq Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kuwait Lebanon Malaysia Mongolia Oman Philippines

PBA D-League

Qatar Saudi Arabia Singapore South Korea Syria Taiwan Thailand United Arab Emirates Vietnam

Europe

Albania

2nd

Austria Armenia Azerbaijan Belarus Belgium Bosnia and Herzegovina

2nd

Bulgaria Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Estonia Finland France

2nd

Georgia Germany

2nd 3rd

Greece

2nd

Hungary Iceland Ireland Israel

2nd 3rd

Italy

2nd 3rd

Kosovo

2nd

Latvia Lithuania

2nd

Luxembourg Macedonia Malta Moldova Montenegro Netherlands Norway Poland

2nd

Portugal

2nd

Romania Russia

2nd

Serbia

2nd 3rd

Slovakia Slovenia Spain

2nd 3rd

Sweden

2nd

Switzerland

2nd

Turkey

2nd 3rd

Ukraine United Kingdom

England Scotland

Oceania

Australia New Zealand

International tournaments

Africa

African Champions Cup

Americas

Americas League Liga Sudamericana Torneo InterLigas

Asia

Asian Champions Cup ABA Club Championship ASEAN League WABA Champions Cup

Europe

EuroLeague EuroCup Champions League FIBA Europe
FIBA Europe
Cup Adriatic League

2nd

Alpe Adria Cup Balkan League Baltic League

Defunct tournaments

Americas

Campeonato Sudamericano de Clubes Argentina Brazil Chile United States

ABA (original) CBA IBL USBL WBA

Asia

Japan

bj league NBL NBDL JBL

Europe

SuproLeague Saporta Cup Korać Cup EuroCup Challenge EuroChallenge Central European League North European League Czechoslovakia England Russia Serbia
Serbia
and Montenegro Spain Soviet Union Turkey Yugoslavia

2

.