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Elmer J. Fudd is a fictional cartoon character and one of the most famous Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
characters, and the de facto archenemy of Bugs Bunny. He has one of the more disputed origins in the Warner Bros. cartoon pantheon (second only to Bugs himself).[1] His aim is to hunt Bugs, but he usually ends up seriously injuring himself and other antagonizing characters. He speaks in an unusual way, replacing his Rs and Ls with Ws, so he always refers to Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
as a "scwewy wabbit". Elmer's signature catchphrase is, "Shhh. Be vewy vewy quiet, I'm hunting wabbits", as well as his trademark laughter. The best known Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
cartoons include Chuck Jones' masterpiece What's Opera, Doc?
What's Opera, Doc?
(one of the few times Fudd bested Bugs, though he felt bad about it), the Rossini parody Rabbit
Rabbit
of Seville, and the " Hunting
Hunting
Trilogy" of " Rabbit
Rabbit
Season/Duck Season" shorts ( Rabbit
Rabbit
Fire, Rabbit
Rabbit
Seasoning, and Duck! Rabbit, Duck!) with Fudd, Bugs Bunny, and Daffy Duck. An earlier character named Egghead set some of Elmer's characteristics before the character's most famous trademarks were set.

Contents

1 Egghead 2 Elmer emerges 3 Fat Elmer 4 Elmer-speak 5 Later appearances 6 Portrayal

6.1 Other voice actors

7 In popular culture 8 See also 9 References 10 External links

Egghead Tex Avery
Tex Avery
introduced a new character in his cartoon short Egghead Rides Again, released July 17, 1937.[2] Egghead initially was depicted as having a bulbous nose, funny/eccentric clothing, a voice like Joe Penner (provided either by radio mimic Danny Webb[3] or actor Cliff Nazarro)[2] and an egg-shaped head. Many cartoon historians believe that Egghead evolved into Elmer over a period of a couple of years.[1] However, animation historian Michael Barrier asserts, "The Egghead-Elmer story is actually a little messy, my sense being that most of the people involved, whether they were making the films or publicizing them, not only had trouble telling the characters apart but had no idea why they should bother trying."[4] Egghead made his second appearance in 1937's Little Red Walking Hood
Little Red Walking Hood
and then in 1938 teamed with Warner Bros.' newest cartoon star Daffy Duck
Daffy Duck
in Daffy Duck and Egghead.[1] Egghead continued to make appearances in the Warner cartoons in 1938, such as in The Isle of Pingo Pongo and A-Lad-In Bagdad.[1] In A Feud There Was (1938), Egghead made his entrance riding a motor scooter with the words "Elmer Fudd, Peacemaker" displayed on the side, the first onscreen use of that name. Egghead shifts from having a Moe Howard
Moe Howard
haircut to being bald, and wears a brown derby, a baggy suit, and a high-collared shirt. Egghead returned decades later in the compilation film Daffy Duck's Quackbusters. More recently, he also made a cameo appearance at the end of Looney Tunes: Back in Action and was also given in his own story, which starred him alongside Pete Puma, in the Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
comic book. One animation history suggests that the Egghead character was based on Ripley's Believe It or Not!
Ripley's Believe It or Not!
cartoonist and entertainer Robert Ripley,[5] while the name Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
might have been a reference to the then-popular hunter Elmer Keith.[citation needed] Egghead has the distinction of being the first recurring character created for Leon Schlesinger's Merrie Melodies
Merrie Melodies
series (to be followed by such characters as Sniffles, Inki, and even Bugs Bunny), which had previously contained only one-shot characters, although during the Harman-Ising era, Foxy, Goopy Geer, and Piggy each appeared in a few Merrie Melodies. One of Egghead's final appearances is A Day at the Zoo, which ends with Egghead being swallowed by a lion he had been taunting. Whether intentional or coincidental, this was the end for the Egghead character. In the 1939 cartoon Dangerous Dan McFoo, a new voice actor, Arthur Q. Bryan, was hired to provide the voice of the hero dog character.[citation needed] It was in this cartoon that the popular "milk-sop" voice of Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
was created.[citation needed] Elmer Fudd has since been the chief antagonistic force in the majority of the Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
cartoons, initiating one of the most famous rivalries in the history of American cinema. Barrier notes, " Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
was not a modified version of his fellow Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
character Egghead" and that "the two characters were always distinct. That was evidenced ... by Elmer's being identified in a Warner publicity sheet for Cinderella Meets Fella (filed with the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
as a copyright description) as 'Egghead's brother.'"[4] Elmer emerges

Elmer Fudd, resembling Egghead early in his career, is annoyed by a rabbit in Elmer's Candid Camera.

In 1940, Egghead–Elmer's appearance was refined, giving him a chin and a less bulbous nose (although still wearing Egghead's clothing) and Arthur Q. Bryan's "Dan McFoo" voice in what most people consider Elmer Fudd's first true appearance: a Chuck Jones
Chuck Jones
short entitled Elmer's Candid Camera. The rabbit drives Elmer insane. Later that year, he appeared in Friz Freleng's Confederate Honey (where he's called Ned Cutler) and The Hardship of Miles Standish where his voice and Egghead-like appearance were still the same. Jones would use this Elmer one more time, in 1941's Elmer's Pet Rabbit; its other title character is labeled as Bugs Bunny, but is also identical to his counterpart in Camera. In the interim, the two starred in A Wild Hare. Bugs appears with a carrot, New York accent, and "What's Up, Doc?" catchphrase all in place for the first time, although the voice and physique are as yet somewhat off. Elmer has a better voice, a trimmer figure (designed by Robert Givens, which would be reused soon later in Jones' Good Night Elmer, this time without a red nose) and his familiar hunting clothes. He is much more recognizable as the Elmer Fudd of later cartoons than Bugs is here. In his earliest appearances, Elmer actually "wikes wabbits", either attempting to take photos of Bugs, or adopting Bugs as his pet. The rascally rabbit has the poor Fudd so perplexed that there is little wonder as to why Elmer would become a hunter and in some cases actually proclaim, "I hate wittle gway wabbits!" after pumping buckshot down a rabbit hole.

Elmer in Rabbit Fire
Rabbit Fire
(1951).

Elmer's role in these two films, that of would-be hunter, dupe and foil for Bugs, would remain his main role forever after, and although Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
was called upon to outwit many more worthy opponents, Elmer somehow remained Bugs' classic nemesis, despite (or because of) his legendary gullibility, small size, short temper, and shorter attention span. In Rabbit
Rabbit
Fire, he declares himself vegetarian, hunting for sport only.[6] Elmer was usually cast as a hapless big-game hunter, armed with a double-barreled shotgun (albeit one which could be fired much more than twice without being reloaded) and creeping through the woods "hunting wabbits". In a few cartoons, though, he assumed a completely different persona—a wealthy industrialist type, occupying a luxurious penthouse, or, in one episode involving a role reversal, a sanitarium—which Bugs would of course somehow find his way into. In Dog Gone People, he had an ordinary office job working for demanding boss "Mister Cwabtwee". In another cartoon (Mutt in a Rut) he appeared to work in an office and had a dog he called "Wover Boy", whom he took hunting, though Bugs did not appear. (Elmer also has a hunting dog in To Duck or Not to Duck; in that film, the dog is named Laramore.) Several episodes featured Elmer differently. One (What's Up, Doc?, 1950) has Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
relating his life story to a biographer, and recalling a time which was a downturn for the movie business. Elmer Fudd is a well-known entertainer who, looking for a new partner for his act, sees Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
(after passing caricatures of many other famous 1940s actors (Al Jolson, Jack Benny, Eddie Cantor, Bing Crosby) who, like Bugs, are also out of work). Elmer and Bugs do a one-joke act cross-country, with Bugs dressed like a pinhead, and when he does not know the answer to a joke, Elmer gives it and hits him with a pie in the face. Bugs begins to tire of this gag and pulls a surprise on Fudd, answering the joke correctly and bopping Elmer with a mallet, which prompts the man to point his rifle at Bugs. The bunny asks nervously: "Eh, what's up doc?", which results in a huge round of applause from the audience. Bugs tells Elmer they may be on to something, and Elmer, with the vaudevillian's instinct of sticking with a gag that catches on, nods that they should re-use it. According to this account, the common Elmer-as-hunter episodes are entirely staged. One episode where Bugs "lost" in the hunting was Hare Brush
Hare Brush
(1956). Here, Elmer has been committed to an insane asylum because he believes he is a rabbit (though it is also revealed that he is a millionaire and owns a mansion and a yacht). Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
enters Fudd's room and Elmer bribes him with carrots, then leaves the way the real rabbit entered. Bugs acts surprisingly (for him) naïve, assuming Elmer just wanted to go outside for a while. Elmer's psychiatrist arrives, and thinking Fudd's delusion has affected his appearance, drugs Bugs and conditions him into believing that he is Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
'after which Bugs starts wearing hunting clothes and acting like Elmer, hunting the rabbit-costumed Fudd, who is in turn acting like Bugs. Their hunt is cut short when Bugs is arrested by a government agent as Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
is wanted for tax evasion. After Bugs is hauled away trying to explain that the rabbit is Elmer Fudd, Fudd breaks the fourth wall and tells the audience "I may be a scwewy wabbit, but I'm not going to Alcatwaz" as he hops away as if he had planned the whole thing. Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
has occasionally appeared in other costumes, notably as Cupid. He tries to convince Bugs about love, but Bugs is reluctant, thinking to himself "Don't you look like some guy who's always after me?" and pictures the Elmer in hunter's clothes. The Cupid Elmer plots to get even with Bugs, using his love arrows to make Bugs fall in love with an artificial rabbit at a dog track. Elmer also appeared in this form opposite Daffy Duck
Daffy Duck
in The Stupid Cupid (1944). The Bugs–Elmer partnership was so familiar to audiences that in a late 1950s cartoon, Bugs' Bonnets, a character study is made of what happens to the relationship between the two when they each accidentally don a different selection of hats (Native American wig, pilgrim hat, military helmets, bridal veil and top hat, to name a few). The result is comic mayhem; a steady game of one-upmanship that ultimately leads to matrimony. Fat Elmer For a short time in the 1941–1942 season, Elmer's appearance was modified again, for five cartoons: Wabbit Twouble; The Wacky Wabbit; The Wabbit Who Came to Supper; Any Bonds Today?; and Fresh Hare. He became a heavy-set, beer-bellied character, patterned after Arthur Q. Bryan's real-life appearance, and still chasing Bugs (or vice versa). However, audiences did not accept a fat Fudd, so ultimately the slimmer version returned for good. This time period also saw a temporary change in Elmer's relationship with Bugs Bunny. Instead of being the hunter, Elmer was the victim of unprovoked pestering by Bugs. In Wabbit Twouble, Bugs plays a number of gags on Elmer, advising the audience, "I do dis kind o' stuff to him all t'wough da picture!" (A line somewhat ironically would later be said by Cecil Turtle as he and his friends cheat Bugs out of winning a race). Another short, The Wacky Wabbit, finds Elmer focused on prospecting for gold which would be used to fund the World War II effort. Elmer sings a variation of the old prospector's tune "Oh! Susanna" made just for this cartoon (complete with the phrase "V for Victory"), with Bugs joining in just before starting to hassle Elmer. He made a later appearance in an episode of The Sylvester and Tweety Mysteries as a Russian version with a simple name "Boris" who owns another comedy club in Russia. Elmer-speak He nearly always vocalised consonants [r] and [l], pronouncing them as [w] instead (a trait that also characterized Tweety
Tweety
Bird) when he would talk in his slightly raspy voice. This trait was prevalent in the Elmer's Candid Camera
Elmer's Candid Camera
and Elmer's Pet Rabbit
Elmer's Pet Rabbit
cartoons, where the writers would give him exaggerated lines such as, "My, that weawwy was a dewicious weg of wamb." to further exaggerate his qualities as a harmless nebbish. That characteristic seemed to fit his somewhat timid and childlike persona. And it worked. The writers often gave him lines filled with those letters, such as doing Shakespeare's Romeo as "What wight thwough yonduh window bweaks!" or Wagner's Ride of the Valkyries as "Kiww the wabbit, kiww the wabbit, kiww the wabbit...!" or "The Beautifuw Bwue Danube, by Johann Stwauss", Stage Door Cartoon's line "Oh, you dubbuh-cwossing wabbit! You tweachewous miscweant!" or the name of actress "Owivia deHaviwwand". Elmer's speech impediment is so well known that Google
Google
allows the user to change the search engine language to "Elmer Fudd." Comedian Robin Williams
Robin Williams
often referred to the impediment as "Fudd syndrome" whenever he accidentally slipped up and replaced an "l" or "r" with a "w" sound in a word. Part of the joke is that Elmer is presumably incapable of pronouncing his own first name correctly. Occasionally Elmer would properly pronounce an "r" or "l" sound, depending on whether or not it was vital for the audience to understand what the word was. (For example, in 1944's The Old Grey Hare, he clearly pronounces the "r" in the word "picture".) Usually, Elmer mispronounces the "r" and "l" by substituting the sound of "w". Later appearances Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
made appearances in several television specials in the 1970s and 1980s, and some cameo roles in two of the Looney Tunes feature-film compilations. Elmer would also appear frequently on the animated series Tiny Toon Adventures as a teacher at Acme Looniversity, where he was the idol and favorite teacher of Elmyra Duff, the slightly deranged animal lover who resembles Elmer in basic head design, name and lack of intellect. On the other hand, a younger version of him makes a single appearance in the episode Plucky's Dastardly Deed, and is named "Egghead Jr", the "smartest kid in class". Elmer also made cameos on Animaniacs, one in Turkey Jerky, another in the Pinky and the Brain
Pinky and the Brain
short, Don't Tread on Us. Elmer also had a guest starring appearance on Histeria!
Histeria!
in the episode "The Teddy Roosevelt Show", in a sketch where he portrayed Gutzon Borglum. This sketch depicts Elmer/Gutzon's construction of Mount Rushmore, accompanied by Borglum's son Lincoln, portrayed by Loud Kiddington. Elmer made another appearance on Histeria!, this time in his traditional role, during a sketch where the bald eagle trades places with the turkey during Thanksgiving
Thanksgiving
weekend, featured in the episode "Americana". Fudd also appeared on The Sylvester and Tweety Mysteries
The Sylvester and Tweety Mysteries
in the first-season episode A Ticket to Crime as detective Sam Fudd; at the end he took off his clothes and turned into Elmer. Elmer appears as part of the TuneSquad team in Space Jam. In one part of the game he and Yosemite Sam
Yosemite Sam
shoot down the teeth of one of the Monstars dressed in black suites while Misirlou
Misirlou
is heard in the background. Elmer took on a more villainous role in Looney Tunes: Back in Action, in which he is a secret agent for the Acme Corporation. In his scene, Elmer chases Bugs and Daffy through the paintings in the Louvre museum, taking on the different art styles as they do so. At the end, Elmer forgets to change back to his normal style after jumping out of the pointillism painting Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte by Georges Seurat, allowing Bugs to easily disintegrate Elmer by blowing a fan at him. A four-year-old version of Elmer was featured in the Baby Looney Tunes episode "A Bully for Bugs", where he kept taking all of Bugs' candy, and also bullied the rest of his friends. He was also shown with short blond hair. He appeared in most of the songs. An even more villainous Elmer appeared in two episodes of Duck Dodgers as The Mother Fudd, an alien who would spread a disease that caused all affected by it to stand around laughing like Elmer (a parody of the Flood in Halo and the Borg in Star Trek). In Loonatics Unleashed, his descendant, Electro J. Fudd, tried to prove himself the universe's greatest hunter by capturing Ace Bunny, but settled for Danger Duck instead. Elmer himself also makes an appearance in the form of a photo which shows he presumably died at the hands of a giant squirrel.[citation needed] In December 2009, Elmer made an appearance in a Geico
Geico
commercial where the director tells him to say rabbits instead of "wabbits". He was again voiced by Billy West. Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
appears in The Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
Show voiced by Billy West. Portrayed as a wealthy businessman coming home after a hard day's work in the "Merrie Melodies" part of the episode "Best Friends," he sings about his love of "gwiwwed cheese" sandwiches. He later had a brief cameo appearance in "Fish and Visitors" as a weather forecaster briefly exclaiming about the rainy weather and doing his famous chuckle at the end. In "Working Duck," Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
appeared as a newsman where he reports that Daffy Duck
Daffy Duck
was fired from his position as a security guard after falling asleep during a nighttime bank robbery where $10,000,000.00 were stolen. Later on, Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
reports that EnormoCorp went out of business due to the worst business decision in the history of business decisions caused by its CEO Daffy Duck (who succeeded the previous CEO Foghorn Leghorn
Foghorn Leghorn
who retired) where he went with the "Proceed as Planned" choice instead of the "Delay the Merger" choice when he mistook Pete Puma as the new muffin man. As a result of this, Elmer mentioned that 10,000 of its workers are now out of a job and states that experts fear that the world economy could collapse. Elmer also states that disgraced CEO Daffy Duck could not be reached for a comment. In "A Christmas Carol," Elmer Fudd reports on Foghorn Leghorn's plans to end the heat wave on Christmas. Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
later joins the other characters in the Christmas song called "Christmas Rules" at the end of the episode. In "Dear John," Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
reports on Daffy Duck
Daffy Duck
winning a spot on the city council. Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
later reports on Daffy Duck's apparent death where he supposedly lost control of his parade float and drove into the St. Bastian River. In "The Black Widow," Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
reports on the theft of the Hillhurst Diamond from the museum caused by someone called "The Black Widow." On June 8, 2011, Elmer starred in the 3-D short "Daffy's Rhapsody" with Daffy Duck, that short was going to precede the film Happy Feet Two,[7] but was instead shown with Journey 2: The Mysterious Island. Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
appears in Looney Tunes: Rabbits
Rabbits
Run voiced again by Billy West. He appears as a spy working for the Mexican general Foghorn Leghorn. In the 2017 DC Comics/ Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
crossover books, an alternate version of Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
was created for a story in which the character was designed more for the DC Universe and was pitted against Batman
Batman
in the Batman/ Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
Special. In the story, Elmer is a bounty hunter that originated from the country side before he moved to Gotham to make ends meet. He considered putting the shotgun away for good when he fell in love with Silver St. Cloud, but she was killed by hitman Bugs "The Bunny". He goes to a bar called Porky's (which has attendants that are humanoid versions of other famous Looney Tunes stars) to kill Bugs. Bugs confesses to killing Silver, but avoids death by telling Elmer that Bruce Wayne hired him to do it. Elmer believes Bugs as Bruce was Silver's former lover and shoots Bruce at a party for vengeance. Batman
Batman
confronts Elmer in his apartment and defeats the gunman in a fight, where Elmer tells Batman
Batman
about Silver's death and Bugs. Elmer and Batman
Batman
return to Porky's and take out most of the crowd before confronting Bugs. The three are shocked to find Silver in the bar herself, where she revealed that she left Bruce and Elmer because of their dangerous lifestyles and had Bugs fake her death. The story ends with all three of the men requesting a glass of carrot juice from Porky. In the issue's backup story, Bugs, Elmer, and Batman
Batman
re-enact the famous " Rabbit
Rabbit
Season, Duck Season" sketch with Batman
Batman
replacing Daffy as Bugs tells Elmer it's "Bat Season." After getting shot by Elmer too many times, Batman
Batman
takes Bugs' advice and makes it Robin season, causing Elmer to pursue the Dark Knight's sidekicks instead.[8] Portrayal Fudd was originally voiced by radio actor Arthur Q. Bryan, but three times in Bryan's lifetime the voice was provided by the versatile Mel Blanc: in To Duck or Not to Duck, Blanc spoke as Fudd saying "that one", in The Scarlet Pumpernickel
The Scarlet Pumpernickel
(1950), only a single line was needed, and bringing in Bryan was not cost effective, and in What's Opera, Doc?, Elmer's furious scream "SMOG!" was dubbed by Mel Blanc, although Bryan had voiced the rest of the part. Later, during the musician's union strike of 1958, another artist did the voice for Elmer's co-starring appearance in Pre-Hysterical Hare. There is no documented reason for Bryan's absence, leaving some fans to speculate that he refused to cross the picket lines. In 1959, Bryan died aged 60, and Hal Smith was selected to replace him as Elmer, but after just two cartoons were recorded by the new actor, and another was made in which Fudd has no lines and therefore no voice, the character was soon retired. Although in more recent years other voice actors have alternated as Elmer's voice, Bryan's characterization remains the definitive one. He was never credited onscreen, because Blanc had a clause in his contract that required him to receive a screen credit and, perhaps inadvertently, denied the same to other voice performers. Blanc would take on the role regularly in the 1970s and 1980s, supplying Elmer's voice for new footage in compilation feature films and similar TV specials, as well as some all-new specials. He admitted in his autobiography that he found the voice difficult to get "right", never quite making it his own. In Speechless, the famous lithograph issued following Blanc's death, Elmer is not shown among the characters bowing their heads in tribute to Blanc. Other voice actors Besides Arthur Q. Bryan, other actors have voiced Elmer:

Danny Webb or Cliff Nazarro (as Egghead; 1937–1939; sources differ) Roy Rogers
Roy Rogers
(singing voice in A Feud There Was) Mel Blanc
Mel Blanc
(Saying "That one" in the hand-shaking scene in To Duck or Not To Duck, The Scarlet Pumpernickel, screaming "SMOG!" in What's Opera, Doc?, Daffy Duck
Daffy Duck
and Porky Pig
Porky Pig
Meet the Groovie Goolies, Bugs Bunny's Valentine, A Connecticut Rabbit
Rabbit
in King Arthur's Court, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Bunny, Bugs Bunny's Bustin' Out All Over, The Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
Mystery Special, Bugs Bunny's Wild World of Sports) Dave Barry (Pre-Hysterical Hare) Hal Smith (Dog Gone People, What's My Lion?, 1961 Post Cereal Alpha-Bits
Alpha-Bits
commercial) Roy Firestone
Roy Firestone
(as Egghead; Daffy Duck's Quackbusters) Jeff Bergman (Tiny Toon Adventures, Happy Birthday, Bugs!: 50 Looney Years, Bugs Bunny's Overtures to Disaster, Box-Office Bunny, (Blooper) Bunny, Bugs Bunny's Creature Features, Invasion of the Bunny Snatchers, Wabbit, The 1st 13th Annual Fancy Anvil Awards Show Program Special...Live!...In Stereo) Greg Burson
Greg Burson
(Tiny Toon Adventures, The Sylvester and Tweety
Tweety
Mysteries, Sheep, Dog 'n' Wolf) Joe Alaskey (Tiny Toon Adventures: How I Spent My Vacation) Tom Kenny
Tom Kenny
(as Egghead; The Sylvester and Tweety
Tweety
Mysteries, as Fudd; Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
webtoons) Frank Welker
Frank Welker
(Animaniacs) Billy West
Billy West
(Space Jam, Quest for Camelot
Quest for Camelot
Sing-A-Longs, Looney Tunes Sing-A-Longs, Looney Tunes: Reality Check, Looney Tunes: Stranger Than Fiction, Looney Tunes: Back in Action, Bah, Humduck! A Looney Tunes Christmas, The Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
Show, Daffy's Rhapsody, Looney Tunes: Rabbits
Rabbits
Run, GEICO
GEICO
commercials and various video games) Brian Drummond (Baby Looney Tunes) Chris Edgerly (Drawn Together) Noel Blanc (Family Guy Presents Stewie Griffin: The Untold Story) Quinton Flynn (Robot Chicken) Kevin Shinick
Kevin Shinick
(Mad)

In popular culture The search engine Google
Google
has been translated into many languages, some of them for sheer comedic purposes. One of the novelty languages is "Elmer Fudd."[9] Comedian and actor Robin Williams
Robin Williams
also performed a famous sketch where he sang the Bruce Springsteen song "Fire" as Elmer Fudd. In the film Fletch Lives, the eponymous character (while in disguise) gives his name as " Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
Gantry".[citation needed] See also

List of cartoons featuring Elmer Fudd

References

^ a b c d Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
at Don Markstein's Toonopedia. Archived from the original on June 16, 2016. ^ a b Egghead at Don Markstein's Toonopedia. Archived from the original on June 16, 2016. ^ Kress, Earl. "Great Scott!". MyNameIsEarlKress.com. Archived from the original on November 30, 2006. Retrieved April 9, 2015. As per Keith Scott, who gave Webb's birth name of Dave Webber, and Mark Evanier, who gave it as “Dave Weber".  ^ a b Barrier, Michael (June 25, 2009). "Summer Slumber". MichaelBarrier.com. Retrieved February 3, 2013.  ^ Thompson, Neal (April 29, 2013). "Believe Them or Not! Six 'True' Stories About Robert Ripley". Biographile.com. Retrieved April 9, 2015.  ^ Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Rabbit
Rabbit
Fire. Elmer: I'm a vegetawian. I onwwy hunt for the sport. ^ "More 3D Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
Shorts On The Way". ComingSoon.net. June 8, 2011. Retrieved February 15, 2012.  ^ Batman/ Elmer Fudd
Elmer Fudd
Special
Special
#1 ^ "Ewmew Fudd". Google. Retrieved Jun 21, 2009. 

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Space Jam Looney Tunes: Back in Action

Music/Songs

"Merrily We Roll Along" "The Merry-Go-Round Broke Down" "Powerhouse" "The Gold
Gold
Diggers' Song (We're in the Money)" "Camptown Races"

Other

Video games

Book Category

v t e

Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Animation

Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
and Merrie Melodies

Shorts

characters

The Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
Show The Looney Looney Looney Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
Movie (1981) Bugs Bunny's 3rd Movie: 1001 Rabbit
Rabbit
Tales (1982) Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island
Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island
(1983) Daffy Duck's Quackbusters
Daffy Duck's Quackbusters
(1988) Tiny Toon Adventures

characters

Taz-Mania The Plucky Duck Show The Sylvester & Tweety
Tweety
Mysteries Space Jam
Space Jam
(1996) Baby Looney Tunes Duck Dodgers

characters

Looney Tunes: Back in Action (2003) Loonatics Unleashed

characters

The Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
Show

episodes

New Looney Tunes

DC Comics

Batman: The Animated Series Superman: The Animated Series The New Batman
Batman
Adventures Batman
Batman
Beyond Static Shock The Zeta Project Justice League Teen Titans Justice League
Justice League
Unlimited The Batman Krypto the Superdog Legion of Super Heroes Batman: The Brave and the Bold Young Justice Green Lantern: The Animated Series DC Nation Shorts Teen Titans
Teen Titans
Go! Beware the Batman Justice League: Gods and Monsters Chronicles Vixen Justice League
Justice League
Action Freedom Fighters: The Ray Constantine: City of Demons DC Super Hero Girls

TV series

Scooby-Doo

What's New, Scooby-Doo? Shaggy & Scooby-Doo
Scooby-Doo
Get a Clue! Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated Be Cool, Scooby-Doo! Scoobynatural

Animaniacs

Animaniacs

characters

Pinky and the Brain Pinky, Elmyra & the Brain Animaniacs
Animaniacs
(reboot; 2020)

Tom and Jerry

Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
Tales The Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
Show

The Lego Movie

The Lego Movie
The Lego Movie
(2014) The Lego Batman
Batman
Movie (2017) The Lego Ninjago Movie (2017) Unikitty! The Lego Movie
The Lego Movie
Sequel (2019)

Theatrical feature-length films

The Looney Looney Looney Bugs Bunny
Bugs Bunny
Movie (1981) Bugs Bunny's 3rd Movie: 1001 Rabbit
Rabbit
Tales (1982) Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island
Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island
(1983) Daffy Duck's Quackbusters
Daffy Duck's Quackbusters
(1988) Batman: Mask of the Phantasm (1993) Space Jam
Space Jam
(1996) Quest for Camelot
Quest for Camelot
(1998) The Iron Giant
The Iron Giant
(1999) Osmosis Jones
Osmosis Jones
(2001) Looney Tunes: Back in Action (2003) The Lego Movie
The Lego Movie
(2014) Storks (2016) The Lego Batman
Batman
Movie (2017) The Lego Ninjago Movie (2017) Teen Titans Go! To the Movies
Teen Titans Go! To the Movies
(2018) Smallfoot (2018) The Lego Movie
The Lego Movie
Sequel (2019)

Other TV series

Freakazoid! Histeria! Coconut Fred's Fruit Salad Island Detention Baby Blues Ozzy & Drix ¡Mucha Lucha!
¡Mucha Lucha!
(characters) 3 South Xiaolin Showdown Firehouse Tales Johnny Test

characters

Road Rovers Mad ThunderCats Waynehead Mike Tyson Mysteries Bunnicula Right Now Kapow Dorothy and the Wizard of Oz Wacky Races Green Eggs and Ham

Television specials

A Miser Brothers' Christmas (2008) Scooby-Doo! Spooky Games (2012) Robot Chicken
Robot Chicken
DC Comics
DC Comics
Special
Special
(2012 Scooby-Doo! Haunted Holidays (2012) Scooby-Doo! and the Spooky Scarecrow
Scooby-Doo! and the Spooky Scarecrow
(2013) Scooby-Doo! Mecha Mutt Menace (2013) Robot Chicken
Robot Chicken
DC Comics
DC Comics
Special
Special
2: Villains in Paradise (2014) Scooby-Doo! Ghastly Goals (2014) Tom and Jerry: Santa's Little Helpers (2014) Lego DC Comics: Batman
Batman
Be-Leaguered (2014) Elf: Buddy's Musical Christmas (2014) Scooby-Doo! and the Beach Beastie (2015) Robot Chicken
Robot Chicken
DC Comics
DC Comics
Special
Special
III: Magical Friendship (2015) Lego Scooby-Doo! Knight Time Terror (2015) DC Super Hero Girls: Super Hero High (2016)

Direct-to-video films

Tiny Toon Adventures: How I Spent My Vacation (1992) Batman
Batman
& Mr. Freeze: SubZero (1998) Scooby-Doo
Scooby-Doo
on Zombie Island (1998) Scooby-Doo! and the Witch's Ghost
Scooby-Doo! and the Witch's Ghost
(1999) Wakko's Wish
Wakko's Wish
(1999) Tweety's High-Flying Adventure (2000) Scooby-Doo
Scooby-Doo
and the Alien Invaders (2000) Batman
Batman
Beyond: Return of the Joker (2000) Scooby-Doo
Scooby-Doo
and the Cyber Chase (2001) Tom and Jerry: The Magic Ring (2002) Baby Looney Tunes' Eggs-traordinary Adventure
Baby Looney Tunes' Eggs-traordinary Adventure
(2003) Scooby-Doo! and the Legend of the Vampire
Scooby-Doo! and the Legend of the Vampire
(2003) Scooby-Doo! and the Monster of Mexico
Scooby-Doo! and the Monster of Mexico
(2003) Batman: Mystery of the Batwoman (2003) Scooby-Doo! and the Loch Ness Monster
Scooby-Doo! and the Loch Ness Monster
(2004) Kangaroo Jack: G'Day U.S.A.! (2004) ¡Mucha Lucha!: The Return of El Maléfico (2005) Tom and Jerry: Blast Off to Mars (2005) Aloha, Scooby-Doo!
Aloha, Scooby-Doo!
(2005) Tom and Jerry: The Fast and the Furry (2005) The Batman
Batman
vs. Dracula (2005) Scooby-Doo! in Where's My Mummy?
Scooby-Doo! in Where's My Mummy?
(2005) Scooby-Doo! Pirates Ahoy!
Scooby-Doo! Pirates Ahoy!
(2005) Superman: Brainiac Attacks (2006) Tom and Jerry: Shiver Me Whiskers (2006) Teen Titans: Trouble in Tokyo (2006) Bah, Humduck! A Looney Tunes
Looney Tunes
Christmas (2006) Chill Out, Scooby-Doo!
Chill Out, Scooby-Doo!
(2007) Superman: Doomsday (2007) Tom and Jerry: A Nutcracker Tale (2007) Justice League: The New Frontier (2008) Batman: Gotham Knight (2008) Scooby-Doo! and the Goblin King
Scooby-Doo! and the Goblin King
(2008) Wonder Woman (2009) Scooby-Doo! and the Samurai Sword
Scooby-Doo! and the Samurai Sword
(2009) Green Lantern: First Flight (2009) Superman/Batman: Public Enemies (2009) Scooby-Doo! Abracadabra-Doo
Scooby-Doo! Abracadabra-Doo
(2010) Justice League: Crisis on Two Earths (2010) Batman: Under the Red Hood (2010) Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
Meet Sherlock Holmes (2010) Scooby-Doo! Camp Scare (2010) Superman/Batman: Apocalypse (2010) All-Star Superman
Superman
(2011) Green Lantern: Emerald Knights (2011) Tom and Jerry
Tom and Jerry
and the Wizard of Oz (2011) Scooby-Doo! Legend of the Phantosaur
Scooby-Doo! Legend of the Phantosaur
(2011) Batman: Year One (2011) Justice League: Doom (2012) Scooby-Doo! Music of the Vampire
Scooby-Doo! Music of the Vampire
(2012) Superman
Superman
vs. The Elite (2012) Batman: The Dark Knight Returns (2012/2013) Tom and Jerry: Robin Hood and His Merry Mouse (2012) Big Top Scooby-Doo!
Big Top Scooby-Doo!
(2012) Scooby-Doo! Mask of the Blue Falcon
Scooby-Doo! Mask of the Blue Falcon
(2013) Superman: Unbound (2013) Scooby-Doo! Adventures: The Mystery Map (2013) Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox (2013) Tom and Jerry's Giant Adventure
Tom and Jerry's Giant Adventure
(2013) Scooby-Doo! Stage Fright
Scooby-Doo! Stage Fright
(2013) JLA Adventures: Trapped in Time (2014) Justice League: War (2014) Scooby-Doo! WrestleMania Mystery
Scooby-Doo! WrestleMania Mystery
(2014) Son of Batman
Batman
(2014) Batman: Assault on Arkham (2014) Scooby-Doo! Frankencreepy
Scooby-Doo! Frankencreepy
(2014) Tom and Jerry: The Lost Dragon (2014) Justice League: Throne of Atlantis (2015) Lego DC Comics
DC Comics
Super Heroes: Justice League
Justice League
vs. Bizarro League (2015) Scooby-Doo! Moon Monster Madness
Scooby-Doo! Moon Monster Madness
(2015) The Flintstones & WWE: Stone Age SmackDown! (2015) Batman
Batman
vs. Robin (2015) Batman
Batman
Unlimited: Animal Instincts (2015) Tom and Jerry: Spy Quest (2015) Scooby-Doo! and Kiss: Rock and Roll Mystery (2015) Justice League: Gods and Monsters (2015) Looney Tunes: Rabbits
Rabbits
Run (2015) Batman
Batman
Unlimited: Monster Mayhem (2015) Lego DC Comics
DC Comics
Super Heroes: Justice League
Justice League
– Attack of the Legion of Doom (2015) Batman: Bad Blood (2016) Lego DC Comics
DC Comics
Super Heroes: Justice League
Justice League
– Cosmic Clash (2016) Justice League
Justice League
vs. Teen Titans
Teen Titans
(2016) Lego Scooby-Doo! Haunted Hollywood
Lego Scooby-Doo! Haunted Hollywood
(2016) Tom and Jerry: Back to Oz (2016) Lego DC Comics
DC Comics
Super Heroes: Justice League
Justice League
– Gotham City Breakout (2016) Batman: The Killing Joke (2016) Scooby-Doo! and WWE: Curse of the Speed Demon (2016) DC Super Hero Girls: Hero of the Year (2016) Batman
Batman
Unlimited: Mechs vs. Mutants (2016) Batman: Return of the Caped Crusaders (2016) Justice League
Justice League
Dark (2017) Scooby-Doo! Shaggy's Showdown
Scooby-Doo! Shaggy's Showdown
(2017) The Jetsons & WWE: Robo-WrestleMania! (2017) Teen Titans: The Judas Contract (2017) DC Super Hero Girls: Intergalactic Games (2017) Tom and Jerry: Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (2017) Lego Scooby-Doo! Blowout Beach Bash
Lego Scooby-Doo! Blowout Beach Bash
(2017) Lego DC Super Hero Girls: Brain Drain (2017) Batman
Batman
and Harley Quinn (2017) Batman
Batman
vs. Two-Face (2017) Scooby-Doo! & Batman: The Brave and the Bold (2018) Batman: Gotham by Gaslight (2018) Lego DC Comics
DC Comics
Super Heroes: The Flash (2018) Suicide Squad: Hell to Pay (2018) Batman
Batman
Ninja (2018) Lego DC Super Hero Girls: Super-Villain High (2018)

Short films

The Duxorcist (1987) The Night of the Living Duck (1988) Box-Office Bunny
Box-Office Bunny
(1990) I'm Mad (1994) Chariots of Fur (1994) Carrotblanca (1995) Another Froggy Evening (1995) Superior Duck (1996) Pullet Surprise (1997) Marvin the Martian
Marvin the Martian
in the Third Dimension (1997) From Hare to Eternity
From Hare to Eternity
(1997) Father of the Bird (1997) Little Go Beep (2000) Chase Me
Chase Me
(2003) The Karate Guard
The Karate Guard
(2005) DC Showcase: The Spectre (2010) DC Showcase: Jonah Hex (2010) Coyote Falls
Coyote Falls
(2010) Fur of Flying
Fur of Flying
(2010) DC Showcase: Green Arrow (2010) Superman/Shazam!: The Return of Black Adam (2010) Rabid Rider
Rabid Rider
(2010) DC Showcase: Catwoman (2011) I Tawt I Taw a Puddy Tat
I Tawt I Taw a Puddy Tat
(2011) Daffy's Rhapsody
Daffy's Rhapsody
(2012) The Master (2016)

See also

Warner Animation Group Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Cartoons Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Family Entertainment Hanna-Barbera Cartoon
Cartoon
Network Productions

Cartoon
Cartoon
Network Studios Williams Street Cartoon
Cartoon
Network Studios Europe

Category

Cartoon
Cartoon
portal Animation portal Fictional

.