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The Coppa Italia
Coppa Italia
(Italian for Italy
Italy
Cup; officially known as TIM Cup because of its sponsorship) is an Italian football annual cup competition. Its first edition was held in 1922 and was won by Vado. The second tournament was scheduled for the 1926–27 season but was cancelled in the round of sixteen. The third edition was not held until 1935–36 when it started being scheduled annually. The events of World War II interrupted the tournament after the 1942–43 season, and it did not resume again until 1957–58. Juventus is the competition's most successful club with 12 wins, followed by Roma with 9. Juventus has contested the most finals with 18, followed by Roma with 17 finals. The holder can wear a "tricolore" cockade (Italian: coccarda), akin to the roundels that appear on military aircraft and automatically qualifies for the UEFA
UEFA
Europa League group stage the following next season.

Contents

1 Format 2 Winners by year 3 Performance by club

3.1 Trophies 3.2 Finals

4 Media coverage 5 References 6 External links

Format[edit]

Logo until 2009–10 season

The competition is a knockout tournament with pairings for each round made in advance; the draw for the whole competition is made before a ball is kicked. Each tie is played as a single leg, with the exception of the two-legged semi-finals. If a match is drawn, extra time is played. In the event of a draw after 120 minutes, a penalty shoot-out is contested. As well as being presented with the trophy, the winning team also qualifies for the UEFA Europa League
UEFA Europa League
(formerly the UEFA Cup). If the winners have already qualified for the UEFA
UEFA
Champions League via Serie A, or are not entitled to play in UEFA
UEFA
competitions for any reason, the place goes to the next highest placed finisher in the league table.

Coccarda, winners' patch

There are a total of eight rounds in the competition. The competition begins in August with the first round and is contested only by the lowest-ranked clubs – those outside the top two divisions. Clubs playing in Serie B
Serie B
join in during the second round and the 12 lowest-ranked teams in Serie A
Serie A
based on the previous league season's positions (unless they are to compete in European competition that year) begin the competition in the third round before August is over. The remaining eight Serie A
Serie A
teams join the competition in the fourth round in January, at which point 16 teams remain. The round of 16, the quarter-finals and the first leg of the semi-finals are then played in quick succession after the fourth round and the second leg of the semi-final is played a couple of months later; in April before the May-contest final. The rather unusual two-leg final was eliminated since the 2007–08 edition and a single-match final is now played at the Stadio Olimpico
Stadio Olimpico
in Rome.[1]

Phase Round Clubs remaining Clubs involved Winners from previous round New entries this round Leagues entering at this round

First Phase First Round 78 36 none 36 Teams from Serie C
Serie C
and Serie D

Second Round 60 40 18 22 Serie B

Third Round 40 32 20 12 Lowest-ranked Serie A
Serie A
teams

Fourth Round 24 16 16 none none

Second Phase Round of 16 16 16 8 8 Highest-ranked Serie A
Serie A
teams

Quarter-finals 8 8 8 none none

Semi-finals 4 4 4 none none

Final 2 2 2 none none

Winners by year[edit]

Coppa Italia

1922–00 – Vado (1) 1935–36 – Torino (1) 1936–37 – Genoa (1) 1937–38 – Juventus (1) 1938–39 – Internazionale (1) 1939–40 – Fiorentina (1) 1940–41 – Venezia (1) 1941–42 – Juventus (2) 1942–43 – Torino (2) 1957–58 – Lazio (1) 1958–59 – Juventus (3) 1959–60 – Juventus (4) 1960–61 – Fiorentina (2) 1961–62 – Napoli (1) 1962–63 – Atalanta (1) 1963–64 – Roma (1) 1964–65 – Juventus (5) 1965–66 – Fiorentina (3) 1966–67 – Milan (1) 1967–68 – Torino (3) 1968–69 – Roma (2) 1969–70 – Bologna (1) 1970–71 – Torino (4) 1971–72 – Milan (2) 1972–73 – Milan (3) 1973–74 – Bologna (2) 1974–75 – Fiorentina (4) 1975–76 – Napoli (2) 1976–77 – Milan (4) 1977–78 – Internazionale (2) 1978–79 – Juventus (6) 1979–80 – Roma (3) 1980–81 – Roma (4) 1981–82 – Internazionale (3) 1982–83 – Juventus (7) 1983–84 – Roma (5) 1984–85 – Sampdoria (1) 1985–86 – Roma (6) 1986–87 – Napoli (3) 1987–88 – Sampdoria (2) 1988–89 – Sampdoria (3) 1989–90 – Juventus (8) 1990–91 – Roma (7) 1991–92 – Parma (1) 1992–93 – Torino (5) 1993–94 – Sampdoria (4) 1994–95 – Juventus (9) 1995–96 – Fiorentina (5) 1996–97 – Vicenza (1) 1997–98 – Lazio (2) 1998–99 – Parma (2) 1999–00 – Lazio (3) 2000–01 – Fiorentina (6) 2001–02 – Parma (3) 2002–03 – Milan (5) 2003–04 – Lazio (4) 2004–05 – Internazionale (4) 2005–06 – Internazionale (5) 2006–07 – Roma (8) 2007–08 – Roma (9) 2008–09 – Lazio (5) 2009–10 – Internazionale (6) 2010–11 – Internazionale (7) 2011–12 – Napoli (4) 2012–13 – Lazio (6) 2013–14 – Napoli (5) 2014–15 – Juventus (10) 2015–16 – Juventus (11) 2016–17 – Juventus (12)

Performance by club[edit] Trophies[edit]

Club Winners Winning years

Juventus

12

1938, 1942, 1959, 1960, 1965, 1979, 1983, 1990, 1995, 2015, 2016, 2017

Roma

9

1964, 1969, 1980, 1981, 1984, 1986, 1991, 2007, 2008

Internazionale

7

1939, 1978, 1982, 2005, 2006, 2010, 2011

Fiorentina

6

1940, 1961, 1966, 1975, 1996, 2001

Lazio

6

1958, 1998, 2000, 2004, 2009, 2013

Torino

5

1936, 1943, 1968, 1971, 1993

Milan

5

1967, 1972, 1973, 1977, 2003

Napoli

5

1962, 1976, 1987, 2012, 2014

Sampdoria

4

1985, 1988, 1989, 1994

Parma

3

1992, 1999, 2002

Bologna

2

1970, 1974

Vicenza

1

1997

Atalanta

1

1963

Venezia

1

1941

Genoa

1

1937

Vado

1

1922[1]

Total

69[2]

Notes 1 The 1922 tournament was contested only by minor teams, the biggest clubs having left FIGC
FIGC
to form a private league of their own. 2 Although 70 tournaments have been contested only 69 championships have been assigned. The 1926–27 tournament was cancelled in the round of sixteen.

Finals[edit]

Club Finalists Finals years

Juventus

18

1938, 1942, 1959, 1960, 1965, 1973, 1979, 1983, 1990, 1992, 1995, 2002, 2004, 2012, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018

Roma

17

1937, 1941, 1964, 1969, 1980, 1981, 1984, 1986, 1991, 1993, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2013

Milan

14

1942, 1967, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1985, 1990, 1998, 2003, 2016, 2018

Internazionale

13

1939, 1959, 1965, 1977, 1978, 1982, 2000, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011

Torino

13

1936, 1938, 1943, 1963, 1964, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1988, 1993

Fiorentina

10

1940, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1966, 1975, 1996, 1999, 2001, 2014

Lazio

9

1958, 1961, 1998, 2000, 2004, 2009, 2013, 2015, 2017

Napoli

9

1962, 1972, 1976, 1978, 1987, 1989, 1997, 2012, 2014

Sampdoria

7

1985, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1994, 2009

Parma

5

1992, 1995, 1999, 2001, 2002

Palermo

3

1974, 1979, 2011

Hellas Verona

3

1976, 1983, 1984

Atalanta

3

1963, 1987, 1996

Genoa

2

1937, 1940

Venezia

2

1941, 1943

Bologna

2

1970, 1974

Alessandria

1

1936

Novara

1

1939

SPAL

1

1962

Catanzaro

1

1966

Padova

1

1967

Cagliari

1

1969

Ancona

1

1994

Vicenza

1

1997

Vado

1

1922

Udinese

1

1922

Total

140

Note: from 1968 to 1971, FIGC
FIGC
introduced a final group instead of semifinals and finals. For statistical equity, only champions and runners-up of those groups are counted as finalists. Moreover, in 1971, a decisive match between the two best clubs was played to assign the cup. Media coverage[edit] The later stages of the competition are broadcast by Sky Sports
Sky Sports
in both Ireland and the United Kingdom. In Spain, the later stages of the competition are broadcast by Teledeporte
Teledeporte
since the 2016–17 edition.[2] In MENA, Abu Dhabi Sports started broadcasting the competition since the 2015–16 edition.[3] References[edit]

^ "TIM Cup – Sede di Gara Finale 2007/2008" (PDF) (in Italian). Lega Nazionale Professionisti. 2007-12-06. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 28, 2008.  ^ " Teledeporte
Teledeporte
compra a última hora la retransmisión de la Supercopa de Italia entre Juventus y AC Milan". palco23.com (in Spanish). Retrieved 2017-03-01.  ^ "كأس إيطاليا Archives - Abu Dhabi Sports أبو ظبي الرياضية". Abu Dhabi Sports أبو ظبي الرياضية. Retrieved 2017-01-17. 

External links[edit]

Association football
Association football
portal Italy
Italy
portal

Italy
Italy
– List of Cup Finals (with links to full results) from RSSSF Coppa Italia
Coppa Italia
Fixtures and Results Coppa Italia
Coppa Italia
all matches by season

v t e

Coppa Italia

Seasons

1922 1926–27 1935–36 1936–37 1937–38 1938–39 1939–40 1940–41 1941–42 1942–43 1958 1958–59 1959–60 1960–61 1961–62 1962–63 1963–64 1964–65 1965–66 1966–67 1967–68 1968–69 1969–70 1970–71 1971–72 1972–73 1973–74 1974–75 1975–76 1976–77 1977–78 1978–79 1979–80 1980–81 1981–82 1982–83 1983–84 1984–85 1985–86 1986–87 1987–88 1988–89 1989–90 1990–91 1991–92 1992–93 1993–94 1994–95 1995–96 1996–97 1997–98 1998–99 1999–2000 2000–01 2001–02 2002–03 2003–04 2004–05 2005–06 2006–07 2007–08 2008–09 2009–10 2010–11 2011–12 2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18

Finals

1922 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

v t e

Football in Italy

Overview

National association League system List of clubs List of clubs by honours won List of venues Records Scudetto Cadetti Capocannoniere

International

Italy B team C team Olympic team Under-21 Under-20 Under-19 Under-18 Under-17 Under-16 Under-15 Italy
Italy
women

Leagues

Lega Serie A Lega Serie B Serie C Lega Nazionale Dilettanti Lega Calcio

defunct

League competitions

Serie A

Prima Divisione

defunct

Divisione Nazionale

defunct

Serie B Serie C

Lega Pro Prima Divisione

defunct

Lega Pro Seconda Divisione

defunct

Serie D Eccellenza Promozione Prima Categoria Seconda Categoria Terza Categoria

Cup competitions

Coppa Italia Supercoppa Italiana Coppa Italia
Coppa Italia
Serie C Supercoppa di Serie C

Supercoppa di Lega di Seconda Divisione

defunct

Coppa Italia
Coppa Italia
Serie D Coppa Italia
Coppa Italia
Dilettanti

Youth competitions

Leagues

Campionato Primavera 1 Campionato Primavera 2 Campionato Nazionale Dante Berretti Campionato Juniores Nazionali Campionato Nazionale Primavera
Campionato Nazionale Primavera
(defunct)

Coppa Italia
Coppa Italia
Primavera Supercoppa Primavera Torneo di Viareggio

Women's competitions

Serie A Coppa Italia Supercoppa Italiana

Awards

Gran Galà del Calcio AIC Italian Football Hall of Fame

Miscellaneous

Totonero 1980 Totonero 1986 Italian Law 91/1981, Article 18B financial doping scandals Caso Genoa 2006 Italian football scandal 2011–12 Italian football scandal 2015 Italian football scandal Article 52 of N.O.I.F. Serie A
Serie A
players Foreign Serie A
Serie A
players Foreign Serie B
Serie B
players

Seasons

1999–2000 2000–01 2001–02 2002–03 2003–04 2004–05 2005–06 2006–07 2007–08 2008–09 2009–10 2010–11 2011–12 2012–13 2013–14 2014–15 2015–16 2016–17 2017–18

v t e

UEFA
UEFA
members national football cups

Current

Albania Andorra Armenia Austria Azerbaijan Belarus Belgium Bosnia and Herzegovina Bulgaria Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark England Estonia Faroe Islands Finland France Georgia Germany Gibraltar Greece Hungary Iceland Israel Italy Kazakhstan Kosovo Latvia Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macedonia Malta Moldova Montenegro Netherlands Northern Ireland Norway Poland Portugal Republic of Ireland Romania Russia San Marino Scotland Serbia Slovakia Slovenia Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey Ukraine Wales

Defunct

Czechoslovakia East Germany Serbia and Montenegro USSR Yugoslavia

Non-UEFA<

.