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(i)

As player:

NBA champion (1957, 1959–1961) 8× NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
(1953–1960) NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game MVP (1955) 4× All-NBA First Team
All-NBA First Team
(1956–1959) 3× All-NBA Second Team
All-NBA Second Team
(1953, 1955, 1960) NBA 25th Anniversary Team NBA 50th Anniversary Team No. 21 retired by Boston
Boston
Celtics Consensus first-team All-American (1950) 2× First-team All-PCC (1949, 1950) No. 11 retired by USC

As coach:

NBA champion (1972) ABA champion (1971) ABL champion (1962) NBA Coach of the Year (1972) ABA Coach of the Year (1970) 3× NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game head coach (1968, 1972, 1973)

As executive:

NBA champion (1980, 1982, 1985, 1987, 1988)

Career statistics

Points 12,665 (17.8 ppg)

Rebounds 2,779 (3.9 rpg)

Assists 2,101 (3.0 apg)

Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame as player

Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame as coach

College Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame Inducted in 2006

William Walton Sharman (May 25, 1926 – October 25, 2013) was an American professional basketball player and coach. He is mostly known for his time with the Boston Celtics
Boston Celtics
in the 1950s, partnering with Bob Cousy in what some consider the greatest backcourt duo of all time. As a coach, Sharman won titles in the ABL, ABA, and NBA, and is credited with introducing the now ubiquitous morning shootaround. He was the first North American sports figure to win a championship as a player, coach, and executive. He was a 10-time NBA champion (having won four titles as a player with the Celtics, one as head coach of the Los Angeles Lakers, and five as a Lakers executive), and a 12-time World Champion in basketball overall counting his ABL and ABA titles.[1] Sharman is also a two-time Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame inductee, having been being inducted in 1976 as a player, and in 2004 as a coach.[2] Only John Wooden, Lenny Wilkens
Lenny Wilkens
and Tommy Heinsohn share this double honor.

Contents

1 Early years 2 Baseball career 3 NBA playing career 4 Professional coaching career 5 Later years 6 NBA career statistics

6.1 Regular season 6.2 Playoffs

7 Head coaching record 8 References 9 External links

Early years[edit] Sharman completed high school in the Central California city of Porterville, California. He served during World War II from 1944 to 1946 in the US Navy, and was a graduate of the University of Southern California. He played 1st base on the 1948 USC Trojans' College World Series championship team. Following his senior year, Sharman was selected as one of the 1950 NCAA Men's Basketball
Basketball
All-Americans. Baseball career[edit] From 1950 to 1955 Sharman played professional baseball in the Brooklyn Dodgers minor league system. He was called up to the Dodgers late in the 1951 season but did not appear in a game. He was part of a September 27 game in which the entire Brooklyn bench was cleared from the dugout for arguing with the home plate umpire over a ruling at the plate. This has led to the legend that Sharman holds the distinction of being the only player in baseball history to have ever been ejected from a major league game without ever appearing in one. However, although Sharman was among the Dodger bench players that had to go to the clubhouse, none of them were actually barred from playing in the game. In fact, in the top of the ninth, one of the other dismissed players, Wayne Terwilliger, was used as a pinch-hitter in the game.[3] NBA playing career[edit] Sharman was drafted by the Washington Capitols in the 2nd round of the 1950 NBA draft. Following the disbanding of the Capitols, he was selected by the Fort Wayne Pistons
Fort Wayne Pistons
in the dispersal draft and was subsequently traded to the Boston Celtics
Boston Celtics
(with Bob Brannum) for Chuck Share prior to the 1951–52 season.[4] Sharman played a total of ten seasons for the Celtics, leading the team in scoring between the 1955–56 and 1958–59 seasons and averaging over 20 points per game during three of them.[5]

Sharman in 1952

Sharman was one of the first NBA guards to shoot better than .400 from the field. He led the NBA in free throw percentage a record seven times (including a record five consecutive seasons),[2] and his mark of 93.2% in the 1958–59 season remained the NBA record until Ernie DiGregorio topped it in 1976–77. Sharman still holds the record for consecutive free throws in the playoffs with 56.[1] Sharman was named to the All-NBA First Team
All-NBA First Team
from 1956 through 1959, and was an All-NBA Second Team member in 1953, 1955, and 1960.[4] Sharman played in eight NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
games, scoring in double figures in seven of them. He was named the 1955 NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game MVP after scoring ten of his fifteen points in the fourth quarter.[6] Sharman still holds the NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game record for field goals attempted in a quarter with 12. Sharman ended his NBA playing career after 11 seasons in 1961. Professional coaching career[edit] Sharman coached the Cleveland Pipers
Cleveland Pipers
of the American Basketball
Basketball
League to the league championship in 1962.[2] He next went on to coach Los Angeles State (now California State, Los Angeles) for two seasons. In 1970–71 he coached the Utah Stars
Utah Stars
to an ABA title and was a co-recipient of the ABA Coach of the Year honors. After resigning as coach for the Utah Stars, Sharman signed a contract to coach the Los Angeles Lakers. Controversy later ensued when the owner of the Utah Stars brought suit against Sharman for breach of contract stemming from his resignation, and a tort case against the owner of the Los Angeles Lakers for inducing such breach of contract. Sharman was originally ordered to pay $250,000 in damages, but later appealed the trial court decision and reversed the judgement. The following season, he guided the Wilt Chamberlain
Wilt Chamberlain
and Jerry West-led Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
to an NBA record 33 game win streak, a then-record 69-13 win-loss mark, the first Lakers championship in Los Angeles and the first for the team in more than a decade. That season, Sharman was named NBA Coach of the Year. He is one of two men to win NBA and ABA championships as a coach; coincidentally, the other, Alex Hannum, also coached a Chamberlain-led team (the 1967 Philadelphia 76ers) to an NBA championship. Sharman invented the morning shootaround as a way to burn off nervous energy on game days. He took the shootaround with him to his first coaching jobs in the ABL, the ABA, and later, the NBA. After the Lakers won the championship in 1972, every other team in the league added the shootaround to its game-day regimen.[2] Later years[edit] Sharman was enshrined in the Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame in 1976 as a player and again in 2004 as a coach. He is one of only four people to be enshrined in both categories, the others being John Wooden, Lenny Wilkens and his former teammate Tom Heinsohn. In 1971, Sharman was named to the NBA 25th Anniversary Team. On October 29, 1996, Sharman was named one of the NBA's 50 Greatest Players. As Lakers General Manager, Sharman built the 1980 and 1982 NBA Championship teams, and as Lakers President he oversaw the 1985, 1987 and 1988 NBA Championship teams. Sharman retired from the Lakers front office in 1991 at age 65.[1] Sharman was the author of two books, Sharman on Basketball
Basketball
Shooting and The Wooden-Sharman Method: A Guide to Winning Basketball
Basketball
with John Wooden and Bob Selzer. The gymnasium at Porterville High School is named after him. After his former basketball team the Los Angeles Jets dissolved in 1962, he sued to enforce his employment contract with the Jets, culminating in the case Sharman v. Longo (1967) 249 Cal.App.2d 948. In 2013, Sharman decided to sell his 2010 NBA Championship ring that he received from the Lakers to benefit charity.[7] Sharman died at his home in Redondo Beach, California
Redondo Beach, California
on October 25, 2013 at the age of 87, after having had a stroke the week prior.[8] NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend

  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game

 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw
Free throw
percentage

 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game

 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

† Denotes seasons in which Sharman won an NBA championship

* Led the league

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP MPG FG% FT% RPG APG PPG

1950–51 Washington 31 – .370 .889 3.5 1.3 12.2

1951–52 Boston 63 22.0 .389 .859 3.5 2.4 10.7

1952–53 Boston 71 32.9 .436 .850* 4.1 2.7 16.2

1953–54 Boston 72 34.3 .450 .844* 3.5 3.2 16.0

1954–55 Boston 68 36.1 .427 .897* 4.4 4.1 18.4

1955–56 Boston 72 37.5 .438 .867* 3.6 4.7 19.9

1956–57† Boston 67 35.9 .416 .905* 4.3 3.5 21.1

1957–58 Boston 63 35.1 .424 .893 4.7 2.7 22.3

1958–59† Boston 72 33.1 .408 .932* 4.1 2.5 20.4

1959–60† Boston 71 27.0 .456 .866 3.7 2.0 19.3

1960–61† Boston 61 25.2 .422 .921* 3.7 2.4 16.0

Career 711 32.0 .426 .883 3.9 3.0 17.8

All-Star 8 24.3 .385 .815 3.9 2.0 12.8

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP MPG FG% FT% RPG APG PPG

1952 Boston 1 27.0 .583 1.000 3.0 7.0 15.0

1953 Boston 6 33.5 .333 .938 2.5 2.5 11.7

1954 Boston 6 34.3 .432 .860 4.2 1.7 18.8

1955 Boston 7 41.4 .500 .921 5.4 5.4 20.7

1956 Boston 3 39.7 .391 .941* 2.3 4.0 17.3

1957† Boston 10 37.7 .381 .953* 3.5 2.9 21.1

1958 Boston 11 36.9 .407 .929 4.9 2.3 21.1

1959† Boston 11 29.3 .425 .966* 3.3 2.5 20.1

1960† Boston 13 28.0 .421 .811 3.5 1.5 16.8

1961† Boston 10 26.1 .511* .889 2.7 1.7 16.8

Career 78 33.0 .426 .911 3.7 2.6 18.5

Head coaching record[edit]

Legend

Regular season G Games coached W Games won L Games lost W–L % Win–loss %

Post season PG Playoff games PW Playoff wins PL Playoff losses PW–L % Playoff win–loss %

Team Year G W L W–L% Finish PG PW PL PW–L% Result

San Francisco 1966–67 81 44 37 .543 1st in Western 15 9 6 .600 Lost in NBA Finals

San Francisco 1967–68 82 43 39 .524 3rd in Western 10 4 6 .400 Lost in Div. Finals

Los Angeles (ABA) 1968–69 78 33 45 .423 5th in Western - - - – Missed Playoffs

Los Angeles (ABA) 1969–70 84 43 41 .512 4th in Western 17 10 7 .588 Lost in ABA Finals

Utah (ABA) 1970–71 84 57 27 .679 2nd in Western 18 12 6 .667 Won ABA Championship

Los Angeles 1971–72 82 69 13 .841 1st in Pacific 15 12 3 .800 Won NBA Championship

Los Angeles 1972–73 82 60 22 .732 1st in Pacific 17 9 8 .529 Lost in NBA Finals

Los Angeles 1973–74 82 47 35 .573 1st in Pacific 5 1 4 .200 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Los Angeles 1974–75 82 30 52 .366 5th in Pacific - - - – Missed Playoffs

Los Angeles 1975–76 82 40 42 .488 4th in Pacific - - - – Missed Playoffs

Career

819 466 353 .569

97 57 40 .588

References[edit]

^ a b c Shouler, Ken (2013-10-25). "Sharman was HOF player, coach".  ^ a b c d Lavietes, Stuart (October 25, 2013), "Bill Sharman, N.B.A. Hall of Fame Player and Coach, Dies at 87", The New York Times  ^ https://prestonjg.wordpress.com/2013/10/28/no-bill-sharman-was-never-ejected-from-a-major-league-baseball-game-as-a-member-of-the-dodgers/ ^ a b basketball-reference.com. "Bill Sharman". Retrieved 2013-10-27.  ^ The Official NBA Basketball
Basketball
Encyclopedia. Villard Books. 1994. p. 749. ISBN 0-679-43293-0.  ^ The Official NBA Basketball
Basketball
Encyclopedia. Villard Books. 1994. p. 238. ISBN 0-679-43293-0.  ^ Rzeppa, Brian. "Inside The League (Bonus Edition): A TLN Exclusive Interview with Hall of Fame Player/Coach Bill Sharman". Interview. The League News. Retrieved 18 June 2013.  ^ Crowe, Jerry (October 25, 2013), " Bill Sharman
Bill Sharman
dies at 87; basketball legend and former Lakers coach", The Los Angeles Times 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Bill Sharman.

Biography portal

Bill Sharman
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on IMDb Bill Sharman
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(as a player) at the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame Bill Sharman
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(as a coach) at the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame Profile as a player Profile as a coach

Links to related articles

Preceded by Initial coach Utah Stars
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head coach 1968–1971 Succeeded by LaDell Andersen

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(1946–1955) George Senesky (1955–1958) Al Cervi (1958–1959) Neil Johnston (1959–1961) Frank McGuire (1961–1962) Bob Feerick (1962–1963) Alex Hannum
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(1963–1966) Bill Sharman
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(1966–1968) George Lee (1968–1970) Al Attles
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Second Team

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v t e

ABA Coach of the Year Award

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v t e

NBA Coach of the Year Award

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NBA Championships (17)

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