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Whyte Notation
The WHYTE NOTATION for classifying steam locomotives by wheel arrangement was devised by Frederick Methvan Whyte , and came into use in the early twentieth century following a December 1900 editorial in American Engineer and Railroad Journal. The notation counts the number of leading wheels , then the number of driving wheels , and finally the number of trailing wheels , groups of numbers being separated by dashes. Other classification schemes, like UIC classification and the French, Turkish and Swiss systems for steam locomotives, count axles rather than wheels. In the notation a locomotive with two leading axles (four wheels) in front, then three driving axles (six wheels) and then one trailing axle (two wheels) is classified as 4-6-2
4-6-2

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Pannier Tank
A TANK LOCOMOTIVE or TANK ENGINE is a steam locomotive that carries its water in one or more on-board water tanks , instead of a more traditional tender . A tank engine may also have a bunker (or oil tank) to hold fuel. There are several different types of tank locomotive, distinguished by the position and style of the water tanks and fuel bunkers. The most common type has tanks mounted either side of the boiler. This type originated about 1840 and quickly became popular for industrial tasks, and later for shunting and shorter distance main line duties. Tank locomotives have advantages and disadvantages compared to traditional tender locomotives
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Saddle Tank (locomotive)
A TANK LOCOMOTIVE or TANK ENGINE is a steam locomotive that carries its water in one or more on-board water tanks , instead of a more traditional tender . A tank engine may also have a bunker (or oil tank) to hold fuel. There are several different types of tank locomotive, distinguished by the position and style of the water tanks and fuel bunkers. The most common type has tanks mounted either side of the boiler. This type originated about 1840 and quickly became popular for industrial tasks, and later for shunting and shorter distance main line duties. Tank locomotives have advantages and disadvantages compared to traditional tender locomotives
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Side Tank
A TANK LOCOMOTIVE or TANK ENGINE is a steam locomotive that carries its water in one or more on-board water tanks , instead of a more traditional tender . A tank engine may also have a bunker (or oil tank) to hold fuel. There are several different types of tank locomotive, distinguished by the position and style of the water tanks and fuel bunkers. The most common type has tanks mounted either side of the boiler. This type originated about 1840 and quickly became popular for industrial tasks, and later for shunting and shorter distance main line duties. Tank locomotives have advantages and disadvantages compared to traditional tender locomotives
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Tank Locomotive
A TANK LOCOMOTIVE or TANK ENGINE is a steam locomotive that carries its water in one or more on-board water tanks , instead of a more traditional tender . A tank engine may also have a bunker (or oil tank) to hold fuel. There are several different types of tank locomotive, distinguished by the position and style of the water tanks and fuel bunkers. The most common type has tanks mounted either side of the boiler. This type originated about 1840 and quickly became popular for industrial tasks, and later for shunting and shorter distance main line duties. Tank locomotives have advantages and disadvantages compared to traditional tender locomotives
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Duplex Locomotive
A DUPLEX LOCOMOTIVE is a steam locomotive that divides the driving force on its wheels by using two pairs of cylinders rigidly mounted to a single locomotive frame ; it is not an articulated locomotive . The concept was first used in France in 1863, but was particularly developed in the early 1930s by the Baldwin Locomotive Works
Baldwin Locomotive Works
, the largest commercial builder of steam locomotives in North America
North America
, under the supervision of its then chief engineer, Ralph P. Johnson . Prior to this, the term duplex locomotive was sometimes applied to articulated locomotives in general. CONTENTS * 1 Drawbacks of the 2-cylinder locomotive * 2 The duplex solution * 3 Baltimore and Ohio class N-1 #5600 George H
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Tender Locomotive
A TENDER or COAL-CAR is a special rail vehicle hauled by a steam locomotive containing its fuel (wood , coal , or oil ) and water . Steam locomotives consume large quantities of water compared to the quantity of fuel, so their tenders are necessary to keep them running over long distances. A locomotive that pulls a tender is called a TENDER LOCOMOTIVE. Locomotives that do not have tenders and carry all their fuel and water on board the locomotive (itself) instead are called TANK LOCOMOTIVES . A BRAKE TENDER is a tender that is heavy and used (primarily) to provide greater braking efficiency
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Well Tank
A TANK LOCOMOTIVE or TANK ENGINE is a steam locomotive that carries its water in one or more on-board water tanks , instead of a more traditional tender . A tank engine may also have a bunker (or oil tank) to hold fuel. There are several different types of tank locomotive, distinguished by the position and style of the water tanks and fuel bunkers. The most common type has tanks mounted either side of the boiler. This type originated about 1840 and quickly became popular for industrial tasks, and later for shunting and shorter distance main line duties. Tank locomotives have advantages and disadvantages compared to traditional tender locomotives
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Fireless Locomotive
A FIRELESS LOCOMOTIVE is a type of locomotive which uses reciprocating engines powered from a reservoir of compressed air or steam, which is filled at intervals from an external source. They offer advantages over conventional steam locomotives of lower cost per unit, cleanliness, and decreased risk from fire or boiler explosion ; these are counterbalanced by the need for a source to refill the locomotive, and by the limited range afforded by the reservoir. Typical usage was in industrial switching where a conventional locomotive was too noxious or risky, such as in a mine or a food or chemical factory; they also saw use where the source of air or steam was readily available. They were eventually displaced by Diesel and battery electric locomotives fitted with protective appliances; these are described as FLAME-PROOF locomotives
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Patiala State Monorail Trainways
PATIALA STATE MONORAIL TRAINWAYS (PSMT) was a unique rail-guided, partially road-borne railways system running in Patiala
Patiala
(British India ) from 1907 to 1927. PSMT was the second monorail system in India, after the Kundala Valley Railway , and the only operational locomotive-hauled railway system built using the Ewing System in the world. The Kundala Valley Railway pre-dated this, also using the Ewing system between 1902 and 1908, although this only used bullocks for haulage. Following the conversion of the Kundala Valley Railway from a monorail to a narrow gauge railway in 1908, PSMT was the only monorail system in India
India
until its closure in 1927. These were the only instances of a monorail train system in India
India
, until the Mumbai Monorail
Monorail
was opened on 2 February 2014
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Listowel And Ballybunion Railway
The LARTIGUE MONORAIL system was developed by the French engineer CHARLES LARTIGUE (1834–1907). He developed a horse drawn monorail system invented by Henry Robinson Palmer in 1821 further. The most famous Lartigue railway was the Listowel and Ballybunion Railway in Ireland. Another line, 17 km (11 mi) long, was built in 1895 between Feurs and Panissières, in the French département of Loire
Loire
. Lartigue had seen camels in Algeria
Algeria
carrying heavy loads balanced in panniers on their backs. This inspired him to design a new type of railway. Instead of the conventional two parallel rails on the ground, it had a single rail sitting above the sand and held at waist height on A-shaped trestles. The carriages sat astride the trestles like panniers
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Crampton Locomotive
A CRAMPTON LOCOMOTIVE is a type of steam locomotive designed by Thomas Russell Crampton and built by various firms from 1846 . The main British builders were Tulk and Ley and Robert Stephenson and Company . Notable features were a low boiler and large driving wheels . The crux of the Crampton patent was that the single driving axle was placed behind the firebox, so that the driving wheels could be very large. This helped to give this design a low centre of gravity, so that it did not require a very broad-gauge track to travel safely at high speeds. Its wheel arrangement was usually 4-2-0 or 6-2-0
6-2-0

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Shay Locomotive
The SHAY LOCOMOTIVE was the most widely used geared steam locomotive . The locomotives were built to the patents of Ephraim Shay , who has been credited with the popularization of the concept of a geared steam locomotive. Although the design of Ephraim Shay's early locomotives differed from later ones, there is a clear line of development that joins all Shays. CONTENTS * 1 Development * 2 Overview * 3 Classes * 4 Survivors * 5 Images * 6 References * 7 Sources * 8 External links DEVELOPMENT Ephraim Shay (1839–1916), was a schoolteacher, a clerk in a Civil War hospital, a civil servant, a logger , a merchant, a railway owner, and an inventor who lived in Michigan
Michigan
. In the 1860s he became a logger and wished to devise a better way to move logs to the mill than on winter snow sleds
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Gasoline
GASOLINE ( American English
American English
) or PETROL ( British English
British English
), is a transparent, petroleum -derived liquid that is used primarily as a fuel in internal combustion engines . It consists mostly of organic compounds obtained by the fractional distillation of petroleum, enhanced with a variety of additives. On average, a 42-gallon barrel of crude oil (159 L) yields about 19 US gallons (72 L) of gasoline when processed in an oil refinery , though this varies based on the crude oil source's assay . The characteristic of a particular gasoline blend to resist igniting too early (which causes knocking and reduces efficiency in reciprocating engines) is measured by its octane rating . Gasoline
Gasoline
is produced in several grades of octane rating
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Mallet (locomotive)
The MALLET LOCOMOTIVE is a type of articulated steam railway locomotive , invented by the Swiss engineer Anatole Mallet (1837–1919). The essence of his idea combines articulation of the locomotive and compound steam use. The articulation was achieved by supporting the front of the locomotive on a bogie frame (called a Bissell truck ); the compound steam system fed steam at boiler pressure to high-pressure cylinders for the main driving wheels. As the steam was exhausted from those cylinders, it was passed into a low-pressure receiver and was then sent to low-pressure cylinders to power the driving wheels on the Bissell truck
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Narrow Gauge Railway
A NARROW-GAUGE RAILWAY (or NARROW-GAUGE RAILROAD in the US) is a railway with a track gauge narrower than the 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in) of standard gauge railways. Most existing narrow-gauge railways are between 600 mm (1 ft 11 5⁄8 in) and 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in). Since narrow-gauge railways are usually built with smaller radius curves, smaller structure gauges , lighter rails, etc., they can be substantially less costly to build, equip, and operate than standard gauge or broad gauge railways, particularly in mountainous or difficult terrain. The lower costs of narrow-gauge railways mean they are often built to serve industries and communities where the traffic potential would not justify the cost of building a standard or broad gauge line. Narrow-gauge railways also have specialized use in mines and other environments where a very small structure gauge makes a very small loading gauge necessary. Narrow-gauge railways also have more general applications
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