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Welsh-Ryan Arena
WELSH-RYAN ARENA is an 8,117-seat multi-purpose arena in Evanston, Illinois , United States, on the campus of Northwestern University
Northwestern University
. It is home to four Northwestern Wildcats
Northwestern Wildcats
athletic teams: men\'s basketball , women\'s basketball , women's volleyball, and wrestling. It is located inside MCGAW MEMORIAL HALL, to the north of Ryan Field . The building opened in 1952 as a replacement for Patten Gymnasium
Patten Gymnasium
, and was the site of the Final Four for the 1956 NCAA
NCAA
Men\'s Division I Basketball Tournament . It was extensively renovated in 1983, at which time the arena inside the building was renamed Welsh-Ryan Arena. At the conclusion of the 2016–17 basketball season, plans are to renovate and upgrade the arena as part of a $110 million project scheduled to be completed by late 2018
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Municipal Auditorium (Kansas City)
MUNICIPAL AUDITORIUM is a multi-purpose facility located in Kansas City, Missouri . It opened in 1936 and features Streamline Moderne
Streamline Moderne
and Art Deco
Art Deco
architecture and architectural details. CONTENTS * 1 Background * 2 Arena * 3 Music Hall * 4 Little Theatre * 5 Sports succession history * 6 See also * 7 References BACKGROUNDMunicipal Auditorium was the first building built as part of the "Ten-Year Plan", a bond program that passed by a 4 to 1 margin in 1931. The campaign was run by the Civic Improvement Committee chaired by Conrad H. Mann. Other buildings in the plan included the Kansas City City Hall and the Kansas City
Kansas City
branch of the Jackson County Courthouse . The plan was championed by most local politicians including Thomas Pendergast and provided Pendergast with many patronage opportunities during the Great Depression
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NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship
The NCAA DIVISION I MEN\'S BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT (known informally as MARCH MADNESS or the BIG DANCE) is a single-elimination tournament played each spring in the United States
United States
, currently featuring 68 college basketball teams from the Division I level of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), to determine the national championship. The tournament was created in 1939 by the National Association of Basketball Coaches , and was the idea of Ohio
Ohio
State University coach Harold Olsen . Played mostly during March, it has become one of the most famous annual sporting events in the United States. The tournament teams include champions from 32 Division I conferences (which receive automatic bids ), and 36 teams which are awarded at-large berths
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Final Four
In American sports, the FINAL FOUR is the last four teams remaining in a playoff tournament . Usually the final four compete in the two games of a single-elimination tournament's semi-final (penultimate) round. Of these teams, the two who win in the semi-final round play another single-elimination game whose winner is the tournament champion. In some tournaments, the two teams that lose in the semi-final round compete for third place in a consolation game . The term "final four" is most often used in the United States and in sports heavily influenced by that country; elsewhere, only the term "semi-finals" is in common use. "Final four" first appeared in print in a 1975 article for the Official Collegiate Basketball Guide, whose author Ed Chay was a sportswriter for the Cleveland Plain Dealer . Chay stated that the Marquette basketball team "was one of the final four" during the previous season\'s tournament
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Big Ten Conference
The BIG TEN CONFERENCE (B1G), formerly WESTERN CONFERENCE and BIG NINE CONFERENCE, is the oldest Division I collegiate athletic conference in the United States. The conference, consisting of 14 members as of 2016, competes in the NCAA Division I ; its football teams compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), formerly known as Division I-A, the highest level of NCAA
NCAA
competition in that sport. The conference includes the flagship public university in each of 11 states stretching from New Jersey
New Jersey
to Nebraska, as well as two additional public land grant schools and a private university. The Big Ten Conference
Big Ten Conference
was established in 1895 when Purdue University president James H
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Rosemont, Illinois
ROSEMONT is a village in Cook County, Illinois
Cook County, Illinois
, United States
United States
, located immediately northwest of Chicago
Chicago
. As of the 2010 census it had a population of 4,202. The village was incorporated in 1956, though it had been settled long before that. While Rosemont's land area and population are relatively small among municipalities in the Chicago
Chicago
Metropolitan Area , the village is a major center for commercial activity in the region and is a key component of the Golden Corridor . Due to its proximity to several interstates, O\'Hare International Airport , and downtown Chicago, it has emerged as a significant edge city and entertainment district , with corporate facilities, millions of square feet of office space, nearly 50 restaurants, 15 hotels, the 840,000-square-foot (78,000 m2) Donald E
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Rutgers University
RUTGERS, THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW JERSEY (/ˈrʌtɡərz/ ), commonly referred to as RUTGERS UNIVERSITY, RUTGERS, or RU, is an American public research university and the largest institution for higher education in New Jersey
New Jersey
. Rutgers was chartered as QUEEN\'S COLLEGE on November 10, 1766. It is the eighth-oldest college in the United States
United States
and one of the nine colonial colleges chartered before the American Revolution
American Revolution
. The college was renamed RUTGERS COLLEGE in 1825 in honor of Colonel Henry Rutgers (1745–1830), a New York City landowner, philanthropist and former military officer, whose $5,000 bond donation to the school allowed it to reopen after years of financial difficulty. For most of its existence, Rutgers was a private liberal arts college affiliated with the Dutch Reformed Church
Dutch Reformed Church

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Evanston, Illinois
EVANSTON (/ˈɛvənˌstən/ ) is a city in Cook County , Illinois
Illinois
, United States, 12 miles (19 km) north of downtown Chicago
Chicago
, bordered by Chicago
Chicago
to the south, Skokie to the west, and Wilmette to the north. It had a population of 74,486 as of 2010 . It is one of the North Shore communities that adjoin Lake Michigan
Lake Michigan
and is the home of Northwestern University
Northwestern University
. The boundaries of the city of Evanston are coterminous with those of the former Evanston Township , which was dissolved in 2014 by voters with its functions being absorbed by the city of Evanston
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Arena
An ARENA, also known as INDOOR STADIUM, is an enclosed area, often circular or oval-shaped, designed to showcase theater , musical performances , or sporting events . The word derives from Latin harena, a particularly fine/smooth sand used to absorb blood in ancient arenas such as the Colosseum
Colosseum
in Rome
Rome
. It is composed of a large open space surrounded on most or all sides by tiered seating for spectators. The key feature of an arena is that the event space is the lowest point, allowing for maximum visibility. Arenas are usually designed to accommodate a large number of spectators. The term arena is sometimes used as a synonym for a very large venue such as Pasadena's Rose Bowl , but such a facility is typically called a stadium , especially if it does not have a roof. The use of one term over the other has mostly to do with the type of event
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Holabird & Root
The architectural firm now known as HOLABIRD & ROOT was founded in Chicago
Chicago
in 1880. Over the years, the firm has changed its name several times and adapted to the architectural style then current — from Chicago
Chicago
School to Art Deco
Art Deco
to Modern Architecture to Sustainable Architecture . Holabird & Root
Holabird & Root
provides architectural, engineering, interior design, and planning services. It is Chicago's oldest oldest architecture firm. The firm remains a privately held partnership currently operating with three principals and five associate principals. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Other buildings * 3 References * 4 External links HISTORYThe founders, William Holabird and Ossian Cole Simonds , worked in the office of William LeBaron Jenney
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Seating Capacity
SEATING CAPACITY is the number of people who can be seated in a specific space, in terms of both the physical space available, and limitations set by law . Seating capacity
Seating capacity
can be used in the description of anything ranging from an automobile that seats two to a stadium that seats hundreds of thousands of people. The largest sporting venue in the world, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Indianapolis Motor Speedway
, has a permanent seating capacity for more than 235,000 people and infield seating that raises capacity to an approximate 400,000. CONTENTS * 1 In venues * 2 In restaurants * 3 Legal
Legal
capacity and total capacity * 4 See also * 5 References IN VENUES An aerial view of the Melbourne Cricket Ground
Melbourne Cricket Ground
during the 1992 Cricket World Cup final packed with 90,000 people
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Garrett–Evangelical Theological Seminary
THEOLOGY is the critical study of the nature of the divine . It is taught as an academic discipline , typically in universities, seminaries, and schools of divinity
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National Collegiate Athletic Association
The NATIONAL COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION (NCAA) is a non-profit organization which regulates athletes of 1,281 institutions, conferences, and individuals. It also organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States
United States
and Canada, and helps more than 480,000 college student-athletes who compete annually in college sports. The organization is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana . In 2014, the NCAA generated almost a billion dollars in revenue. 80 to 90% of this revenue was due to the Division I Men\'s Basketball
Basketball
Tournament . This revenue is then distributed back into various organizations and institutions across the United States. In August 1973, the current three-division system of Division I , Division II , and Division III was adopted by the NCAA membership in a special convention
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NCAA
The NATIONAL COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION (NCAA) is a non-profit association which regulates athletes of 1,281 institutions, conferences, organizations, and individuals. It also organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States and Canada
Canada
, and helps more than 450,000 college student-athletes who compete annually in college sports. The organization is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana . In 2014, the NCAA generated almost a billion dollars in revenue. 80 to 90% of this revenue was due to the Division I Men\'s Basketball
Basketball
Tournament . This revenue is then distributed back into various organizations and institutions across the United States. In August 1973, the current three-division setup of Division I , Division II , and Division III was adopted by the NCAA membership in a special convention
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Chicago Tribune
The CHICAGO TRIBUNE is a daily newspaper based in Chicago
Chicago
, Illinois , United States
United States
, owned by tronc, Inc. , formerly Tribune Publishing. Founded in 1847, and formerly self-styled as the "World's Greatest Newspaper" (for which WGN radio and television are named), it remains the most-read daily newspaper of the Chicago
Chicago
metropolitan area and the Great Lakes region . It is the eighth-largest newspaper in the United States by circulation (and became the second-largest under Tribune's ownership after the Chicago
Chicago
Tribune's parent company purchased the Los Angeles Times ). Traditionally published as a broadsheet , on January 13, 2009, the Tribune announced it would continue publishing as a broadsheet for home delivery, but would publish in tabloid format for newsstand, news box, and commuter station sales
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1956 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament
The 1956 NCAA BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT involved 25 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of men's NCAA college basketball . It began on March 12, 1956, and ended with the championship game on March 24 on Northwestern University
Northwestern University
's campus in Evanston, Illinois
Evanston, Illinois
. A total of 29 games were played, including a third-place game in each region and a national third-place game. The 1955–56 season was the last in which only one NCAA Tournament was held. Effective in 1956–57, the NCAA divided its membership into two competitive levels. The larger and more competitive athletic programs were placed in the University Division, and smaller programs in the College Division. Accordingly, that season would see separate tournaments contested in the University and College Divisions
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