HOME ListMoto.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Traditional Chinese Characters
Traditional Chinese characters
Chinese characters
(traditional Chinese: 正體字/繁體字; simplified Chinese: 正体字/繁体字; Pinyin: Zhèngtǐzì/Fántǐzì) are Chinese characters
Chinese characters
in any character set that does not contain newly created characters or character substitutions performed after 1946. They are most commonly the characters in the standardized character sets of Taiwan, of Hong Kong and Macau
Macau
or in the Kangxi Dictionary
[...More...]

"Traditional Chinese Characters" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Replacement Character
Specials is a short Unicode
Unicode
block allocated at the very end of the Basic Multilingual Plane, at U+FFF0–FFFF. Of these 16 code points, five are assigned as of Unicode
Unicode
10.0:U+FFF9 INTERLINEAR ANNOTATION ANCHOR, marks start of annotated text U+FFFA INTERLINEAR ANNOTATION SEPARATOR, marks start of annotating character(s) U+FFFB INTERLINEAR ANNOTATION TERMINATOR, marks end of annotation block U+FFFC  OBJECT REPLACEMENT CHARACTER, placeholder in the text for another unspecified object, for example in a compound document. U+FFFD � REPLACEMENT CHARACTER used to replace an unknown, unrecognized or unrepresentable character U+FFFE <noncharacter-FFFE> not a character. U+FFFF <noncharacter-FFFF> not a character.FFFE and FFFF are not unassigned in the usual sense, but guaranteed not to be a Unicode
Unicode
character at all
[...More...]

"Replacement Character" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kangxi Dictionary Form
A dictionary, sometimes known as a wordbook, is a collection of words in one or more specific languages, often arranged alphabetically (or by radical and stroke for ideographic languages), which may include information on definitions, usage, etymologies, pronunciations, translation, etc.[1] or a book of words in one language with their equivalents in another, sometimes known as a lexicon.[1] It is a lexicographical product which shows inter-relationships among the data.[2] A broad distinction is made between general and specialized dictionaries. Specialized dictionaries include words in specialist fields, rather than a complete range of words in the language. Lexical items that describe concepts in specific fields are usually called terms instead of words, although there is no consensus whether lexicology and terminology are two different fields of study
[...More...]

"Kangxi Dictionary Form" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Second Round Of Simplified Chinese Characters
Character(s) may refer to:Contents1 Arts, entertainment, and media1.1 Literature 1.2 Music 1.3 Types of entities 1.4 Other arts, entertainment, and media2 Mathematics and science 3 Morality and social science 4 Symbols 5 Other uses 6 See alsoArts, entertainment, and media[edit] Literature[edit] Character
Character
(novel), a 1936 Dutch novel by Ferdinand Bordewijk Characters (Theophrastus), a classical Greek set of character sketches attributed to TheophrastusMusic[edit]Characters (John Abercrombie album), 1977
[...More...]

"Second Round Of Simplified Chinese Characters" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Unicode
Unicode
Unicode
is a computing industry standard for the consistent encoding, representation, and handling of text expressed in most of the world's writing systems. The latest version contains a repertoire of 136,755 characters covering 139 modern and historic scripts, as well as multiple symbol sets
[...More...]

"Unicode" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Logographic
In written language, a logogram or logograph is a written character that represents a word or phrase. Chinese characters
Chinese characters
and Japanese kanji are logograms; some Egyptian hieroglyphs
Egyptian hieroglyphs
and some graphemes in cuneiform script are also logograms. The use of logograms in writing is called logography. A writing system that is based on logograms is called a logographic system. In alphabets and syllabaries, individual written characters represent sounds rather than concepts. These characters are called phonograms. Unlike logograms, phonograms do not necessarily have meaning by themselves, but are combined to make words and phrases that have meaning
[...More...]

"Logographic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Xin Zixing
The xin zixing (Chinese: 新字形; pinyin: xīn zìxíng; literally: "New character forms") is a standardized[when?] form of Chinese characters set in mainland China. Characteristics[edit] Note: Viewing this section correctly requires certain standard typefaces to be installed and the browser to be configured to use them in appropriate contexts. The xin zixing has adopted various vulgar variants of its characters.[1] For example:群 The orthodox form of this character has 君 above 羊, i.e. 羣. 峰 The orthodox form of this character has 山 above 夆, i.e. 峯. 令 The orthodox form of this character has 亼 above 卩, i.e
[...More...]

"Xin Zixing" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Imitation Song
Imitation Song
Imitation Song
is a style of Chinese typefaces modeled after a type style in Lin'an in the Southern Song Dynasty
[...More...]

"Imitation Song" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Flat Brush Script
The Flat Brush script (simplified Chinese: 漆书; traditional Chinese: 漆書 pinyin: qī shū) is a writing style in Chinese calligraphy that was created by Jin Nong
Jin Nong
(simplified Chinese: 金农; traditional Chinese: 金農) during the Qing dynasty. The writing style is a mix of the clerical script of the Han dynasty and the regular script of the Wei dynasty; these two writing styles make the Flat Brush script a unique writing style in Chinese calligraphy. The technique used to write in the flat brush script is very different from the other writing styles. It has to be written using a flat brush and not the regular East Asian
East Asian
writing brush.[1] About the creator[edit] Jin Nong
Jin Nong
was highly knowledgeable on Chinese calligraphy
[...More...]

"Flat Brush Script" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Grapheme
In linguistics, a grapheme is the smallest unit of a writing system of any given language.[1] An individual grapheme may or may not carry meaning by itself, and may or may not correspond to a single phoneme of the spoken language. Graphemes include alphabetic letters, typographic ligatures, Chinese characters, numerical digits, punctuation marks, and other individual symbols. A grapheme can also be construed as a graphical sign that independently represents a portion of linguistic material.[2] The word grapheme, coined in analogy with phoneme, is derived from Ancient Greek γράφω (gráphō), meaning 'write', and the suffix -eme, by analogy with phoneme and other names of emic units. The study of graphemes is called graphemics. The concept of graphemes is an abstract one and similar to the notion in computing of a character. By comparison, a specific shape that represents any particular grapheme in a specific typeface is called a glyph
[...More...]

"Grapheme" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Neolithic Signs In China
Since the second half of the 20th century, inscriptions have been found on pottery in a variety of locations in China, such as Banpo near Xi'an, as well as on bone and bone marrows at Hualouzi, Chang'an County near Xi'an
[...More...]

"Neolithic Signs In China" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Radical (Chinese Characters)
A Chinese radical (Chinese: 部首; pinyin: bùshǒu; literally: "section header") is a graphical component of a Chinese character under which the character is traditionally listed in a Chinese dictionary. This component is often a semantic indicator (that is, an indicator of the meaning of the character), though in some cases the original semantic connection has become obscure, owing to changes in character meaning over time
[...More...]

"Radical (Chinese Characters)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jōyō Kanji
The jōyō kanji (常用漢字, literally "regular-use Chinese characters") is the guide to kanji characters and their readings, announced officially by the Japanese Ministry of Education. Current jōyō kanji are those on a list of 2,136 characters issued in 2010. It is a slightly modified version of the tōyō kanji, which was the initial list of secondary school-level kanji standardized after World War II. The list is not a comprehensive list of all characters and readings in regular use; rather, it is intended as a literacy baseline for those who have completed compulsory education, as well as a list of permitted characters and readings for use in official government documents
[...More...]

"Jōyō Kanji" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chinese Character Classification
All Chinese characters
Chinese characters
are logograms, but several different types can be identified, based on the manner in which they are formed or derived. There are a handful which derive from pictographs (象形 pinyin: xiàngxíng) and a number which are ideographic (指事 zhǐshì) in origin, including compound ideographs (會意 huìyì), but the vast majority originated as phono-semantic compounds (形聲 xíngshēng). The other categories in the traditional system of classification are rebus or phonetic loan characters (假借 jiǎjiè) and "derivative cognates" (轉注 zhuǎn zhù)
[...More...]

"Chinese Character Classification" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Phonetic Alphabet
The International Phonetic Alphabet
Alphabet
(IPA) is an alphabetic system of phonetic notation based primarily on the Latin alphabet
[...More...]

"International Phonetic Alphabet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

ISO 15924
ISO 15924, Codes for the representation of names of scripts, defines two sets of codes for a number of writing systems (scripts). Each script is given both a four-letter code and a numeric one.[1] Script is defined as "set of graphic characters used for the written form of one or more languages".[1] Where possible the codes are derived from ISO 639-2 where the name of a script and the name of a language using the script are identical (example: Gujarātī ISO 639 guj, ISO 15924 Gujr). Preference is given to the 639-2 Bibliographical codes, which is different from the otherwise often preferred use of the Terminological codes.[1] 4-letter ISO 15924 codes are incorporated into the Language Subtag Registry for IETF language tags and so can be used in file formats that make use of such language tags
[...More...]

"ISO 15924" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.