HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Subsidiary
A subsidiary, subsidiary company or daughter company[1][2][3] is a company that is owned or controlled by another company, which is called the parent company, parent, or holding company.[4][5] The subsidiary can be a company, corporation, or limited liability company. In some cases it is a government or state-owned enterprise. In some cases, particularly in the music and book publishing industries, subsidiaries are referred to as imprints. In the United States railroad industry, an operating subsidiary is a company that is a subsidiary but operates with its own identity, locomotives and rolling stock
[...More...]

"Subsidiary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Company (law)
A company, abbreviated as co., is a legal entity made up of an association of people, be they natural, legal, or a mixture of both, for carrying on a commercial or industrial enterprise. Company
Company
members share a common purpose, and unite in order to focus their various talents and organize their collectively available skills or resources to achieve specific, declared goals
[...More...]

"Company (law)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Corporate Law
Corporate law
Corporate law
(also known as business law or enterprise law or company law) is the body of law that applies to the rights, relations, and conduct of persons, companies, organizations and businesses. It regulates how corporations, investors, shareholders, directors, employees, creditors, and other stakeholders such as consumers, the community, and the environment interact with one another. Corporate law
Corporate law
is a part of a broader companies law (or law of business associations). It is often considered to be a branch of civil law and deals with issues of both private law and public law. The most prominent kind of company, usually referred to as a "corporation", is a "juristic person", i.e
[...More...]

"Corporate Law" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

OEM
An Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) is a company that produces parts and equipment that may be marketed by another manufacturer. For example, if Acme Manufacturing Co. makes power cords that are used on IBM
IBM
computers, Acme is an OEM. However, the term is used in several other ways, which causes ambiguity. It sometimes means the maker of a system that includes other companies' subsystems, an end-product producer, an automotive part that is manufactured by the same company that produced the original part used in the automobile's assembly, or a value-added reseller.[1][2][3]Contents1 Automotive parts 2 Computer software 3 Economies of scale 4 See also 5 ReferencesAutomotive parts[edit] When referring to auto parts, OEM refers to the manufacturer of the original equipment, that is, the parts assembled and installed during the construction of a new vehicle
[...More...]

"OEM" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Morgan Motor Company
The Morgan Motor Company
Morgan Motor Company
is a family-owned British motor car manufacturer that was founded in 1910 by Henry Frederick Stanley Morgan. Morgan is based in Malvern Link, an area of Malvern, Worcestershire, and employs 177 people. Morgan has stated that they produce in excess of 1300 cars per year,[1] all assembled by hand. The waiting list for a car is approximately six months, and has sometimes been as long as ten years. Morgan cars are unusual because wood has been used in their construction for a century, for the chassis of several early models and still in the 21st century for the body shell.[2] A visitor centre and museum feature exhibits about the company's history from Edwardian times until the present day, developments in automobile technology, and a display of automobiles
[...More...]

"Morgan Motor Company" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Caterham Cars
Caterham
Caterham
Cars is a British manufacturer of specialist lightweight sports cars established in Caterham, Surrey, with their headquarters in Crawley, Sussex. Their current model, the Caterham 7
Caterham 7
(or Seven), originally launched in 1973, is a direct evolution of the Series 3 Lotus Seven
Lotus Seven
designed by Colin Chapman. In the 1990s the company made the Caterham
Caterham
21, a two-seater soft top alternative to the MGF and Lotus Elise, (which both sold many more units). A track-only car, the SP/300.R, a joint project with Lola was released for customer testing in 2010 and was scheduled for release in 2013
[...More...]

"Caterham Cars" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dearborn, Michigan
Dearborn is a city in the State of Michigan. It is located in Wayne County and is part of the Detroit
Detroit
metropolitan area. Dearborn is the eighth largest city in the State of Michigan. As of the 2010 census, it had a population of 98,153.[5] First settled in the late 18th century by French farmers in a series of ribbon farms along the Rouge River and the Sauk Trail, the community grew with the establishment of the Detroit
Detroit
Arsenal on the Chicago Road
Chicago Road
linking Detroit
Detroit
and Chicago. It later grew into a manufacturing hub for the automotive industry. The city was the home of Henry Ford
Henry Ford
and is the world headquarters of the Ford Motor Company. It has a campus of the University of Michigan as well as Henry Ford
Henry Ford
College
[...More...]

"Dearborn, Michigan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Michigan
Michigan
Michigan
(/ˈmɪʃɪɡən/ ( listen)) is a state in the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and Midwestern regions of the United States. The state's name, Michigan, originates from the ( Ojibwe
Ojibwe
word) mishigamaa, meaning "large water" or "large lake".[3][7] Michigan
Michigan
is the tenth most populous of the 50 United States, with the 11th most extensive total area, and the largest state by total area east of the Mississippi
Mississippi
River.[b] Michigan's capital is Lansing, and its largest city is Detroit. Michigan
Michigan
is the only state to consist of two peninsulas. The Lower Peninsula, to which the name Michigan
Michigan
was originally applied, is often noted to be shaped like a mitten
[...More...]

"Michigan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Delaware
Delaware
Delaware
(/ˈdɛləwɛər/ ( listen))[10] is one of the 50 states of the United States, located in the Mid-Atlantic or Northeastern region.[a] It is bordered to the south and west by Maryland, to the north by Pennsylvania, and to the east by New Jersey and the Atlantic Ocean. The state takes its name from Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr, an English nobleman and Virginia's first colonial governor.[11] Delaware
Delaware
occupies the northeastern portion of the Delmarva Peninsula. It is the second smallest and sixth least populous state, but the sixth most densely populated. Delaware
Delaware
is divided into three counties, the lowest number of any state. From north to south, they are New Castle County, Kent County, and Sussex
Sussex
County
[...More...]

"Delaware" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Brentwood, Essex
Brentwood is a town in the Borough of Brentwood, in the county of Essex
Essex
in the East of England.[2] It is located in the London
London
commuter belt, 20 miles (30 km) east-north-east of Charing Cross, and near the M25 motorway. Latest figures suggest the town has a population of 79,000. Brentwood is a suburban town with a small but expanding[3] shopping area and high street
[...More...]

"Brentwood, Essex" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Essex
Essex
Essex
/ˈɛsɪks/ is a county in the East of England. Immediately north east of London, it is one of the home counties. It borders the counties of Suffolk
Suffolk
and Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
to the north, Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
to the west, Kent
Kent
across the estuary of the River Thames
River Thames
to the south and London
London
to the south-west. The county town is Chelmsford, which is the only city in the county. Essex
Essex
occupies the eastern part of the former Kingdom of Essex, which subsequently united with the other Anglian and Saxon
Saxon
kingdoms to make England
England
a single nation state
[...More...]

"Essex" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Competition Law
Competition
Competition
law is a law that promotes or seeks to maintain market competition by regulating anti-competitive conduct by companies.[1][2] Competition
Competition
law is implemented through public and private enforcement.[3] Competition
Competition
law is known as anti-trust law in the United States, and as anti-monopoly law in China[1] and Russia. In previous years it has been known as trade practices law in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Australia. In the European Union, it is referred to as both antitrust[4] and competition law.[5][6] The history of competition law reaches back to the Roman Empire. The business practices of market traders, guilds and governments have always been subject to scrutiny, and sometimes severe sanctions
[...More...]

"Competition Law" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Share (finance)
Share may refer to:To share a resource (such as food or money) is to make joint use of it; see Sharing Share, Kwara, a town and LGA in Kwara State, Nigeria Share (finance), a stock or other security such as a mutual fund Share (newspaper), a newspaper in Toronto, Canada Share (film), a 2015 short drama film Southern Hemisphere Auroral
[...More...]

"Share (finance)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Capital Markets Law
Securities regulation in the United States is the field of U.S. law that covers transactions and other dealings with securities. The term is usually understood to include both federal- and state-level regulation by purely governmental regulatory agencies, but sometimes may also encompass listing requirements of exchanges like the New York Stock Exchange and rules of self-regulatory organizations like the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority
Financial Industry Regulatory Authority
(FINRA). On the federal level, the primary securities regulator is the Securities and Exchange Commission
Securities and Exchange Commission
(SEC)
[...More...]

"Capital Markets Law" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Accounting
Accounting
Accounting
or accountancy is the measurement, processing, and communication of financial information about economic entities[1][2] such as businesses and corporations. The modern field was established by the Italian mathematician Luca Pacioli
Luca Pacioli
in 1494.[3] Accounting, which has been called the "language of business",[4] measures the results of an organization's economic activities and conveys this information to a variety of users, including investors, creditors, management, and regulators.[5] Practitioners of accounting are known as accountants
[...More...]

"Accounting" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Merger Control
Merger control
Merger control
refers to the procedure of reviewing mergers and acquisitions under antitrust / competition law. Over 130 nations worldwide have adopted a regime providing for merger control. National or supernational competition agencies such as the EU European Commission or the US Federal Trade Commission
Federal Trade Commission
are normally entrusted with the role of reviewing mergers. Merger control
Merger control
regimes are adopted to prevent anti-competitive consequences of concentrations (as mergers and acquisitions are also known)
[...More...]

"Merger Control" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.