HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Standard Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t eA standard-gauge railway is a railway with a track gauge of 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in). The standard gauge is also called Stephenson gauge after George Stephenson, International gauge, UIC gauge, uniform gauge, normal gauge and European gauge in the EU and Russia.[1][2][3][4][5] It is the most widely used railway track gauge across the world with approximately 55% of the lines in the world using it. All high-speed rail lines, except those in Russia, Finland, Portugal and Uzbekistan, utilise standard gauge
[...More...]

"Standard Gauge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Snopes
Snopes.com
Snopes.com
/snoʊps/, formally known as the Urban Legends Reference Pages, is one of the first online fact-checking websites.[4] It is a widely known resource for validating and debunking urban legends and similar stories in American popular culture,[5] receiving 300,000 visits a day in 2010.[6][needs update]Contents1 History 2 Main site 3 Lost legends 4 Accuracy 5 Traffic and users 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] In 1994, David and Barbara Mikkelson created an urban folklore web site that would become Snopes.com. Snopes was an early online encyclopedia focused on urban legends, that mainly presented search results of user discussions. The site grew to encompass a wide range of subjects and became a resource to which Internet users began submitting pictures and stories of questionable veracity
[...More...]

"Snopes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

High-speed Rail In Uzbekistan
High speed rail
High speed rail
in Uzbekistan currently consists of 600 km of track and services using Talgo 250
Talgo 250
equipment, branded Afrosiyob by operator Uzbekistan Railways, on upgraded conventional lines. All HSR lines have been built using upgraded lines on Russian gauge. Other regional railways exist
[...More...]

"High-speed Rail In Uzbekistan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Track Gauge In South America
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "H
[...More...]

"Track Gauge In South America" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Track Gauge In Europe
Europe
Europe
is a continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It comprises the westernmost part of Eurasia. Since around 1850, Europe
Europe
is most commonly considered as separated from Asia
Asia
by the watershed divides of the Ural and Caucasus
Caucasus
Mountains, the Ural River, the Caspian and Black Seas, and the waterways of the Turkish Straits.[5] Though the term "continent" implies physical geography, the land border is somewhat arbitrary and has moved since its first conception in classical antiquity
[...More...]

"Track Gauge In Europe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Union Of Railways
The UIC (French: Union Internationale des Chemins de fer) or International Union of Railways
International Union of Railways
is an international rail transport industry body.Contents1 Brief history 2 Mission 3 Objectives 4 Members 5 Standard terminology 6 Classification of railway vehicles 7 Some UIC regulations 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksBrief history[edit] The railways of Europe
Europe
originated as many separate concerns, and there were many border changes after World War I
World War I
and the Treaty of Versailles. Colonial railways were the responsibility of the mother country. Into this environment the UIC was created on 17 October 1922,[1] with the aim of standardising industry practices. Ticket revenue sharing was originally undertaken with the UIC Franc currency equivalent
[...More...]

"International Union Of Railways" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

High-speed Rail In Russia
High-speed rail
High-speed rail
is emerging in Russia as an increasingly popular means of transport.Contents1 Experimental trainsets and early operation 2 Lines in operation 3 New lines under consideration 4 Criticism from rural areas 5 ReferencesExperimental trainsets and early operation[edit] ER-200
ER-200
(1984-2009)Two experimental high-speed trainsets were built in 1974 designed for 200 km/h (120 mph) operation: the locomotive-hauled RT-200 ("Russkaya Troika") and the ER-200
ER-200
EMU. The RT-200 set made only experimental runs in 1975 and 1980 and was discontinued due to the unavailability of the ChS-200 high-speed locomotive, which was only delivered later. The ER-200
ER-200
EMU was put into regular service in 1984. In 1992 a second ER-200
ER-200
trainset was built in Riga
[...More...]

"High-speed Rail In Russia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

High-speed Rail In Finland
High-speed rail
High-speed rail
is emerging in Europe as an increasingly popular and efficient means of transport. The first high-speed rail lines in Europe, built in the 1980s and 1990s, improved travel times on intra-national corridors. Since then, several countries have built extensive high-speed networks, and there are now several cross-border high-speed rail links. Railway operators frequently run international services, and tracks are continuously being built and upgraded to international standards on the emerging European high-speed rail network. In 2007, a consortium of European railway operators, Railteam, emerged to co-ordinate and boost cross-border high-speed rail travel. Developing a Trans-European high-speed rail network
Trans-European high-speed rail network
is a stated goal of the European Union, and most cross-border railway lines receive EU funding
[...More...]

"High-speed Rail In Finland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "H
[...More...]

"United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Imperial And US Customary Measurement Systems
The imperial and US customary systems of measurement are two closely inter-related systems of measurement both derived from earlier English system of measurement units which can be traced back to Ancient Roman units of measurement, and Carolingian and Saxon units of measure. US Customary units, developed and used in the United States
United States
after the American Revolution, are based on a subset of the English units
English units
used in the Thirteen Colonies, while the Imperial system of units was developed and used beginning in 1826 in the United Kingdom and subsequently used in the rest of the Commonwealth. US Customary units are the predominant system of units in the United States, but in all Commonwealth countries the metric system has, to varying degrees, replaced the imperial system. Most of the units of measure have been adopted in one way or another since the Norman Conquest
Norman Conquest
(1066)
[...More...]

"Imperial And US Customary Measurement Systems" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Width
In geometric measurements, length is the most extended dimension of an object.[1] In the International System of Quantities, length is any quantity with dimension distance. In other contexts, length is a measured dimension of an object. Length
Length
may be distinguished from height, which is vertical extent, and width or breadth, which are the distance from side to side, measuring across the object at right angles to the length. For example, it is possible to cut a length of wire shorter than the wire's width
[...More...]

"Width" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western) Nicomedia
[...More...]

"Roman Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

High-speed Rail In Portugal
In February 2009, the government of Portugal announced plans to build a high-speed rail line from Lisbon
Lisbon
to Madrid; this plan was cancelled in March 2012.[1] The project was valued at €7.8 billion and the government had claimed it would create 100,000 jobs.[2] The line would link to Spain's Southwest Corridor.Contents1 Current operations 2 Current infrastructure 3 Previous plans for high-speed rail 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksCurrent operations[edit] Since the late 1990s
[...More...]

"High-speed Rail In Portugal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chariot
A chariot is a type of carriage driven by a charioteer using primarily horses[a] to provide rapid motive power. Chariots were used by armies as transport or mobile archery platforms, for hunting or for racing, and as a conveniently fast way to travel for many ancient people. The word "chariot" comes from the Latin
Latin
term carrus, a loanword from Gaulish. A chariot of war or one used in military parades was called a car. In ancient Rome and some other ancient Mediterranean civilizations, a biga required two horses, a triga three, and a quadriga four. The horse chariot was a fast, light, open, two-wheeled conveyance drawn by two or more horses that were hitched side by side, and was little more than a floor with a waist-high guard at the front and sides
[...More...]

"Chariot" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Track Gauge In North America
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t eFurther information: List of rail gauges The vast majority of North American railroads are standard gauge (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in/​1,435 mm). Exceptions include some streetcar, subway and rapid transit systems, mining and tunneling operations, and some narrow-gauge lines particularly in the west, e.g. the isolated White Pass and Yukon Route
White Pass and Yukon Route
system, and the former Newfoundland Railway. As well as the usual reasons for having one gauge i.e. being able to operate through trains without transfer arrangements, the North American continent-wide system of freight car interchange with rolling stock having the same standard gauge, couplings, and air brakes meant that individual companies could minimise their rolling stock requirements by borrowing from other companies. Peak demand periods varied over the continent, with seasonal requirements e.g
[...More...]

"Track Gauge In North America" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Standard Gauge (toy Trains)
Standard Gauge, also known as wide gauge, was an early model railway and toy train rail gauge, introduced in the United States
United States
in 1906 by Lionel Corporation.[1] As it was a toy standard, rather than a scale modeling standard, the actual scale of Standard Gauge locomotives and rolling stock varied. It ran on three-rail track whose running rails were 2 1⁄8 in (53.975 mm) apart.Contents1 Origins 2 Lionel's competitors 3 Lionel's decision to end Standard Gauge 4 After Lionel 5 Manufacturers 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksOrigins[edit] Lionel dubbed its new standard Standard Gauge and trademarked the name. Lionel's Standard Gauge should not be confused with standard gauge for real railroads, or the later 1:64 scale S gauge popularized by American Flyer
American Flyer
after World War II
[...More...]

"Standard Gauge (toy Trains)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.