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Springfield, Missouri
SPRINGFIELD is the third-largest city in the state of Missouri
Missouri
and the county seat of Greene County . As of the 2010 census, its population was 159,498. As of 2016, the Census
Census
Bureau estimated its population at 167,319. It is one of the two principal cities of the Springfield-Branson Metropolitan Area , which has a population of 541,991 and includes the counties of Christian , Dallas , Greene , Polk , Webster , Stone and Taney . Springfield's nickname is "Queen City
City
of the Ozarks " and it is known as the "Birthplace of Route 66 ". It is home to several universities, including Missouri
Missouri
State University , Drury University , and Evangel University
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Federal Information Processing Standard
FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARDS (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the United States federal government for use in computer systems by non-military government agencies and government contractors. FIPS standards are issued to establish requirements for various purposes such as ensuring computer security and interoperability, and are intended for cases in which suitable industry standards do not already exist. Many FIPS specifications are modified versions of standards used in the technical communities, such as the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). CONTENTS * 1 Specific areas of FIPS standardization * 2 Data security standards * 3 Withdrawal of geographic codes * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links SPECIFIC AREAS OF FIPS STANDARDIZATIONThe U.S
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Geographic Names Information System
The GEOGRAPHIC NAMES INFORMATION SYSTEM (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer . GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names. The database is part of a system that includes topographic map names and bibliographic references. The names of books and historic maps that confirm the feature or place name are cited. Variant names, alternatives to official federal names for a feature, are also recorded. Each feature receives a permanent, unique feature record identifier, sometimes called the GNIS identifier
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U.S. State
A STATE is a constituent political entity of the United States
United States
. There are currently 50 states, which are bound together in a union with each other. Each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the United States
United States
federal government . Due to the shared sovereignty between each state and the federal government, Americans
Americans
are citizens of both the federal republic and of the state in which they reside . State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states , except for persons covered by certain types of court orders (e.g., paroled convicts and children of divorced spouses who are sharing custody )
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City
A CITY is a large human settlement . Cities generally have extensive systems for housing , transportation , sanitation , utilities , land use , and communication . Their density facilitates interaction between people, government organizations and businesses, sometimes benefiting different parties in the process. Historically, city-dwellers have been a small proportion of humanity overall, but following two centuries of unprecedented and rapid urbanization , roughly half of the world population now lives in cities, which has had profound consequences for global sustainability. Present-day cities usually form the core of larger metropolitan areas and urban areas - creating numerous commuters traveling towards city centers for employment, entertainment, and edification. However, in a world of intensifying globalization , all cities are in different degree also connected globally beyond these regions
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ZIP Code
ZIP CODES are a system of postal codes used by the United States Postal Service since 1963. The term ZIP is an acronym for Zone Improvement Plan; it was chosen to suggest that the mail travels more efficiently and quickly (zipping along) when senders use the code in the postal address . The basic format consists of five digits. An extended 'ZIP+4' code was introduced in 1983 which includes the five digits of the ZIP Code, followed by a hyphen and four additional digits that determine a more specific location. The term ZIP Code
ZIP Code
was originally registered as a servicemark by the U.S. Postal Service, but its registration has since expired
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UTC-6
UTC−06:00 is a time offset that subtracts six hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). In North America, it is observed in the Central Time Zone during standard time , and in the Mountain Time Zone during the other eight months (see Daylight saving time ). Several Latin American countries and a few other places use it year round. CONTENTS* 1 As standard time (Northern Hemisphere winter) * 1.1 North America * 2 As daylight saving time (Northern Hemisphere summer) * 2.1 North America * 3 As standard time (all year round) * 3.1 North America * 3.2 Central America * 3.3 East Pacific * 4 As standard time (Southern Hemisphere winter) * 4.1 East Pacific * 5 See also * 5.1 References AS STANDARD TIME (NORTHERN HEMISPHERE WINTER)NORTH AMERICACST is standard time in the 6th time zone west of Greenwich, reckoned at the 90th meridian; used in North America in some parts of Canada, Mexico and the United States
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Daylight Saving Time
DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME (abbreviated DST), commonly referred to as DAYLIGHT SAVINGS TIME in speech, and known as SUMMER TIME in some countries, is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn to standard time. George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895. The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation, starting on April 30, 1916. Many countries have used it at various times since then, particularly since the energy crisis of the 1970s . DST is generally not observed near the equator, where sunrise times do not vary enough to justify it
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UTC-5
UTC−05:00 is a time offset that subtracts five hours from Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). In North America, it is observed in the Eastern Time Zone
Eastern Time Zone
during standard time , and in the Central Time Zone during the other eight months (see Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
). The western Caribbean uses it year round
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County Seat
A COUNTY SEAT is an administrative center , seat of government , or capital city of a county or civil parish . The term is used in the United States , Canada
Canada
, Romania
Romania
, Mainland China and Taiwan
Taiwan
. County towns have a similar function in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Republic of Ireland , and historically in Jamaica
Jamaica
. CONTENTS * 1 Function * 2 U.S
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Louisiana Purchase
The LOUISIANA PURCHASE (French : Vente de la Louisiane "Sale of Louisiana") was the acquisition of the Louisiana
Louisiana
territory (828,000 square miles or 2.14 million km²) by the United States
United States
from France in 1803. The U.S. paid fifty million francs ($11,250,000) and a cancellation of debts worth eighteen million francs ($3,750,000) for a total of sixty-eight million francs ($15 million, equivalent to $300 million in 2016). The Louisiana
Louisiana
territory included land from fifteen present U.S. states and two Canadian provinces
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Tennessee
TENNESSEE (/tɛnɪˈsiː/ ( listen ); Cherokee
Cherokee
: ᏔᎾᏏ, translit. Tanasi) is a state located in the southeastern region of the United States
United States
. Tennessee
Tennessee
is the 36th largest and the 16th most populous of the 50 United States
United States
. Tennessee
Tennessee
is bordered by Kentucky and Virginia
Virginia
to the north, North Carolina
North Carolina
to the east, Georgia , Alabama
Alabama
, and Mississippi
Mississippi
to the south, and Arkansas
Arkansas
and Missouri
Missouri
to the west
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Homestead Act
The HOMESTEAD ACTS were several United States federal laws that gave an applicant ownership of land, typically called a "homestead ", at no cost. In all, more than 270 million acres of public land, or nearly 10% of the total area of the U.S., was given away free to 1.6 million homesteaders; most of the homesteads were west of the Mississippi River . An extension of the Homestead Principle in law, the Homestead Acts were an expression of the " Free Soil " policy of Northerners who wanted individual farmers to own and operate their own farms, as opposed to Southern slave-owners who wanted to buy up large tracts of land and use slave labor, thereby shutting out free white men. The first of the acts, the HOMESTEAD ACT OF 1862, opened up millions of acres. Any adult who had never taken up arms against the U.S. government could apply. Women and immigrants who had applied for citizenship were eligible
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Cherokee
(316,049 enrolled tribal members (Eastern Band: 13,000+, Cherokee
Cherokee
Nation: 288,749, United Keetoowah Band: 14,300) 819,105 claimed Cherokee
Cherokee
ancestry in the 2010 Census ) REGIONS WITH SIGNIFICANT POPULATIONS United States North Carolina 16,158 (0.2%) Oklahoma
Oklahoma
102,580 (2.7%) LANGUAGES English, Cherokee
Cherokee
RELIGION Christianity
Christianity
, Kituhwa , Four Mothers Society , Native American Church THIS ARTICLE CONTAINS CHEROKEE SYLLABIC CHARACTERS . Without proper rendering support , you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Cherokee
Cherokee
syllabics.The CHEROKEE (/ˈtʃɛrəkiː/ ; Cherokee
Cherokee
: ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ, translit. Aniyvwiyaʔi or Cherokee: ᏣᎳᎩ, translit
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Nathanael Greene
American Revolutionary War
American Revolutionary War
* Siege of Boston
Siege of Boston
*
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American Revolutionary War
American-Allied victory PEACE OF PARIS : * British recognition of American independence * End of the First British Empire
British Empire
* British retention of Canada
Canada
and Gibraltar Territorial changes * Great Britain cedes to the United States
United States
the area east of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
and south of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and St. Lawrence River
St

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