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Satrapy
Satraps were the governors of the provinces of the ancient Median and Achaemenid Empires and in several of their successors, such as in the Sasanian Empire
Sasanian Empire
and the Hellenistic empires. The word satrap is also often used metaphorically in modern literature to refer to world leaders or governors who are heavily influenced by larger world superpowers or hegemonies and act as their surrogates.[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 Medo-Persian satraps 3 Hellenistic satraps 4 Parthian and Sassanian satraps 5 Western satraps 6 S
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Satavahana
The Satavahanas (IAST: Sātavāhana), also referred to as the Andhras in the Puranas, were an ancient Indian dynasty based in the Deccan region. Most modern scholars believe that the Satavahana
Satavahana
rule began in the first century BCE and lasted until the second century CE, although some assign the beginning of their rule to as early as the 3rd century BCE. The Satavahana
Satavahana
kingdom mainly comprised the present-day Telangana, Andhra Pradesh
Andhra Pradesh
and Maharashtra. At different times, their rule extended to parts of modern Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh, and Karnataka. The dynasty had different capital cities at different times, including Pratishthana
Pratishthana
(Paithan) and Amaravati (Dharanikota). The origin of the dynasty is uncertain, but according to the Puranas, their first king overthrew the Kanva dynasty
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Sassanid Empire
Temporarily controlled during the Byzantine– Sasanian
Sasanian
War of 602–628:  Abkhazia[12]  Russia (  Dagestan
Dagestan
and  Chechnya)  Turkey  Lebanon  Israel   Palestinian National Authority
Palestinian National Authority
( West Bank
West Bank
and Gaza strip)[13]  Jordan  EgyptPart of a series on theHistory of IranMythological historyPishdadian dynasty Kayanian dynastyAncient periodBCPrehistory of Iran Ancient Times–4000Kura–Araxes culture 3400–2000Proto-Elamite 3200–2700Jiroft culture c. 3100 – c. 2200Elam 2700–539 Akkadian
Akkadian
Empire 2400–2150Kassites c. 1500 – c
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Persepolis
Persepolis
Persepolis
(Old Persian:𐎱𐎠𐎼𐎿,Pārsa; Modern Persian: پرسپولیس) was the ceremonial capital of the Achaemenid Empire (ca. 550–330 BC). It is situated 60 km northeast of the city of Shiraz
Shiraz
in Fars Province, Iran. The earliest remains of Persepolis
Persepolis
date back to 515 BC
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Artaxerxes II
Artaxerxes II
Artaxerxes II
Mnemon /ˌɑːrtəˈzɜːrksiːz/ (Old Persian: 𐎠𐎼𐎫𐎧𐏁𐏂, meaning "whose reign is through truth")[1] was the Xšâyathiya Xšâyathiyânâm (King of Kings) of Persia from 404 BC until his death in 358 BC. He was a son of Darius II
Darius II
and Parysatis. Greek authors gave him the epithet "Mnemon" (Greek: mnḗmona, in Old Persian: abiataka), meaning "remembering; having a good memory".[2]Contents1 Rise to power 2 Reign 3 Building projects 4 Identification 5 Issue 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksRise to power[edit] Darius II
Darius II
died in 404 BC, just before the final victory of the Egyptian general, Amyrtaeus, over the Persians in Egypt. His successor was his eldest son Arsames who was crowned as Artaxerxes II in Pasargadae. Even before his coronation, Artaxerxes was facing threats to his rule from his younger brother, Cyrus the Younger
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Asia Minor
Anatolia
Anatolia
(Modern Greek: Ανατολία, Anatolía, from Ἀνατολή, Anatolḗ, modern pronunciation Anatolí;[needs IPA] Turkish: Anadolu "east" or "(sun)rise"), also known as Asia
Asia
Minor (in Medieval and Modern Greek: Μικρά Ἀσία, Mīkrá AsíaTurkish: Küçük Asya, , modern pronunciation Mikrá Asía – "small Asia"), Asian Turkey, the Anatolian peninsula, or the Anatolian plateau, is the westernmost protrusion of Asia, which makes up the majority of modern-day Turkey. The region is bounded by the Black Sea
Black Sea
to the north, the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the south, and the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
to the west
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Revolt Of The Satraps
The Great Satraps' Revolt, or the Revolt of the Satraps, was a rebellion in the Achaemenid Empire of several satraps against the authority of the Great King Artaxerxes II Mnemon. Datames, the satrap of Cappadocia and a talented military commander, had inherited his satrapy from his father Camissares after 384 BC but later problems with the court led him to revolt in 372 BC. The court commanded the neighboring satraps, Autophradates of Lydia and Artumpara of Lycia, to crush the rebellion but Datames successfully resisted their attacks.[1] Ariobarzanes, satrap of Phrygia and a son of the ruler of Pontus, had been made acting satrap of Hellespontine Phrygia until Artabazos, the legitimate heir of the satrapy could take office
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Artaxerxes III
Artaxerxes III
Artaxerxes III
Ochus of Persia
Persia
(/ˌɑːrtəˈzɜːrksiːz/; Old Persian: 𐎠𐎼𐎫𐎧𐏁𐏂 Artaxšaçā)[2] (c. 425 BC – 338 BC) was the Great King (Shah) of Persia
Persia
and the eleventh king of the Achaemenid Empire, as well as the first Pharaoh
Pharaoh
of the 31st dynasty of Egypt. He was the son and successor of Artaxerxes II
Artaxerxes II
and was succeeded by his son, Arses of Persia (also known as Artaxerxes IV)
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Alexander The Great
Alexander
Alexander
III of Macedon
Macedon
(20/21 July 356 BC – 10/11 June 323 BC), commonly known as Alexander
Alexander
the Great (Ancient Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος ὁ Μέγας, translit. Aléxandros ho Mégas, Koine
Koine
Greek: [a.lék.san.dros ho mé.gas]), was a king (basileus) of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon[a] and a member of the Argead
Argead
dynasty. He was born in Pella
Pella
in 356 BC and succeeded his father Philip II to the throne at the age of twenty
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Diadochi
The Diadochi
Diadochi
(/daɪˈædəkaɪ/; plural of Latin
Latin
Diadochus, from Greek: Διάδοχοι, Diádokhoi, "successors") were the rival generals, families, and friends of Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
who fought for control over his empire after his death in 323 BC
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Seleucid Empire
The Seleucid Empire
Empire
(/sɪˈljuːsɪd/;[6] Ancient Greek: Βασιλεία τῶν Σελευκιδῶν, Basileía tōn Seleukidōn) was a Hellenistic
Hellenistic
state ruled by the Seleucid dynasty, which existed from 312 BC to 63 BC; Seleucus I Nicator
Seleucus I Nicator
founded it following the division of the Macedonian empire vastly expanded by Alexander the Great.[7][8][9][10] Seleucus received Babylonia
Babylonia
(321 BC), and from there, expanded his dominions to include much of Alexander's near-eastern territories
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Strategos
Strategos
Strategos
or Strategus, plural strategoi, (Greek: στρατηγός, pl. στρατηγοί; Doric Greek: στραταγός, stratagos; meaning "army leader") is used in Greek to mean military general. In the Hellenistic world
Hellenistic world
and the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
the term was also used to describe a military governor. In the modern Hellenic Army
Hellenic Army
it is the highest officer rank.Contents1 Etymology 2 Classical Greece 3 Hellenistic and Roman use 4 Byzantine use 5 In Messina 6 Modern use 7 Fictional uses 8 References 9 Sources 10 External linksEtymology[edit] Strategos
Strategos
is a compound of two Greek words: stratos and agos. Stratos (στρατός) means army, literally "that which is spread out", coming from the proto-Indo-European root *stere- "to spread"
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East Roman Empire
The Byzantine
Byzantine
Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire, was the continuation of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the East during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople
Constantinople
(modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium). It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.[2] During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural, and military force in Europe
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Pharnabazus II
Pharnabazus II
Pharnabazus II
was a Persian soldier and statesman. He was the son of Pharnaces II of Phrygia
Phrygia
and grandson of Pharnabazus I of Phrygia, and great-grandson of Artabazus I. He and his male ancestors had governed the satrapy of Phrygia
Phrygia
on the Hellespont from its headquarters at Dascylium since 478 BC
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Western Satraps
The Western Satraps, Western Kshatrapas, or Kshaharatas (35–405 CE) were Indo-Scythian
Indo-Scythian
(Saka) rulers of the western and central part of India
India
(Saurashtra and Malwa: modern Gujarat, Maharashtra, Rajasthan and Madhya Pradesh
Madhya Pradesh
states). The Western Satraps
Western Satraps
were contemporaneous with the Kushans who ruled the northern part of the Indian subcontinent and were possibly their overlords, and the Satavahana (Andhra) who ruled in Central India
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Indo-Scythian
Indo- Scythians
Scythians
is a term used to refer to Scythians
Scythians
(Sakas), who migrated into parts of central, northern and western South Asia (Sogdiana, Bactria, Arachosia, Gandhara, Sindh, Kashmir, Punjab, Haryana, Rajasthan, Gujarat
Gujarat
and Maharashtra) from the middle of the 2nd century BC to the 4th century AD. The first Saka
Saka
king in South Asia
South Asia
was Maues/Moga (1st century BC) who established Saka
Saka
power in Gandhara, parts of modern-day Pakistan
Pakistan
and Afghanistan, and gradually extended supremacy over north-western India
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