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Saint David
SAINT DAVID (Welsh : Dewi Sant, Latin : Davidus; c. 500 – c. 589) was a Welsh bishop of Mynyw (now St Davids
St Davids
) during the 6th century; he was later regarded as a saint. He is the patron saint of Wales
Wales
. David was a native of Wales, and a relatively large amount of information is known about his life. However, his birth date is uncertain: suggestions range from 462 to 512. He is traditionally believed to be the son of Saint Non and the grandson of Ceredig ap Cunedda , king of Ceredigion
Ceredigion
. The Welsh annals placed his death 569 years after the birth of Christ, but Phillimore's dating revised this to 601
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Miracle
A MIRACLE is an event not explicable by natural or scientific laws. Such an event may be attributed to a supernatural being (a deity ), magic , a miracle worker , a saint or a religious leader. Informally, the word "miracle" is often used to characterise any beneficial event that is statistically unlikely but not contrary to the laws of nature, such as surviving a natural disaster, or simply a "wonderful" occurrence, regardless of likelihood, such as a birth. Other such miracles might be: survival of an illness diagnosed as terminal, escaping a life-threatening situation or 'beating the odds'. Some coincidences may be seen as miracles
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Annales Cambriae
ANNALES CAMBRIAE (Latin for THE ANNALS OF WALES) is the name given to a complex of Cambro -Latin chronicles compiled or derived from diverse sources at St David\'s in Dyfed , Wales
Wales
. The earliest is a 12th-century presumed copy of a mid-10th century original; later editions were compiled in the 13th century. Despite the name, the Annales Cambriae
Annales Cambriae
record not only events in Wales, but also events in Ireland
Ireland
, Cornwall
Cornwall
, England
England
, Scotland
Scotland
and sometimes further afield, though the focus of the events recorded especially in the later two-thirds of the text is Wales
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Hagiography
A HAGIOGRAPHY (/ˌhæɡiˈɒɡrəfi/ ; from Greek ἅγιος, hagios, meaning 'holy', and -γραφία, -graphia, meaning 'writing') is a biography of a saint or an ecclesiastical leader. The term hagiography may be used to refer to the biography of a saint or highly developed spiritual being in any of the world's spiritual traditions. Christian hagiographies focus on the lives, and notably the miracles of men and women canonized by the Roman Catholic church , the Anglican Communion , the Eastern Orthodox Church , the Oriental Orthodox churches , and the Church of the East . Other religions such as Buddhism , Hinduism , Islam , Sikhism and Jainism also create and maintain hagiographical texts (such as the Sikh Janamsakhis ) concerning saints, gurus and other individuals believed to be imbued with sacred power
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John Davies (historian)
JOHN DAVIES (25 April 1938 – 16 February 2015) was a Welsh historian, and a television and radio broadcaster. He attended university at Cardiff
Cardiff
and Cambridge and taught Welsh at Aberystwyth. He wrote a number of books on Welsh history. CONTENTS * 1 Education * 2 Life and work * 3 Works * 4 References EDUCATIONDavies was born in the Rhondda
Rhondda
, Wales
Wales
, and studied at both University College, Cardiff
Cardiff
, and Trinity College, Cambridge
Trinity College, Cambridge
. LIFE AND WORKDavies was married with four children. After teaching Welsh history at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth , he retired to Cardiff
Cardiff
, and appeared frequently as a presenter and contributor to history programmes on television and radio
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Latin Language
LATIN (Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
. The Latin alphabet is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets , and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet
Phoenician alphabet
. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium
Latium
, in the Italian Peninsula
Italian Peninsula
. Through the power of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire . Vulgar Latin developed into the Romance languages
Romance languages
, such as Italian , Portuguese , Spanish , French , and Romanian
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Holy Trinity
The Christian doctrine of the TRINITY ( Latin : Trinitas, lit. 'triad', from trinus, "threefold") holds that God is three consubstantial persons or hypostases —the Father , the Son (Jesus Christ ), and the Holy Spirit —as "one God in three Divine Persons". The three persons are distinct, yet are one "substance, essence or nature" (homoousios ). In this context, a "nature" is what one is, whereas a "person" is who one is. The opposing view is referred to as Nontrinitarianism
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Radiocarbon Dating
RADIOCARBON DATING (also referred to as CARBON DATING or CARBON-14 DATING) is a method for determining the age of an object containing organic material by using the properties of radiocarbon (14 C), a radioactive isotope of carbon . The method was developed by Willard Libby in the late 1940s and soon became a standard tool for archaeologists. Libby received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work in 1960. The radiocarbon dating method is based on the fact that radiocarbon is constantly being created in the atmosphere by the interaction of cosmic rays with atmospheric nitrogen . The resulting radiocarbon combines with atmospheric oxygen to form radioactive carbon dioxide , which is incorporated into plants by photosynthesis ; animals then acquire 14 C by eating the plants
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Clonard, County Meath
CLONARD (Irish : Cluain Ioraird, meaning "Iorard's pasture" ) is a small village in County Meath
County Meath
, Ireland . It lies on the R148 regional road between the towns of Kinnegad and Enfield . This road was the main road between Dublin
Dublin
and Galway
Galway
until the construction of the M4 motorway . It is still used by traffic avoiding the toll on the M4. Clonard Motte Clonard is notable for being one of the earliest Christian sites in Ireland, being linked with the first Irish bishop Palladius c. 450 and as the location of a major early medieval monastery Clonard Abbey , founded in the 6th century by St. Finnian . c. 1177 , Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath
Hugh de Lacy, Lord of Meath
, built a motte-and-bailey fortification at Clonard. It is a well-known landmark in the village
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Jerusalem
JERUSALEM (/dʒəˈruːsələm/ ; Hebrew
Hebrew
: יְרוּשָׁלַיִם‬ Yerushaláyim ; Arabic : القُدس‎ al-Quds ) is a city in the Middle East
Middle East
, located on a plateau in the Judaean Mountains between the Mediterranean and the Dead Sea
Dead Sea
. It is one of the oldest cities in the world , and is considered holy to the three major Abrahamic religions Judaism
Judaism
, Christianity
Christianity
and Islam
Islam
. Israelis and Palestinians both claim Jerusalem
Jerusalem
as their capital , as Israel
Israel
maintains its primary governmental institutions there and the State of Palestine
State of Palestine
ultimately foresees it as its seat of power; however, neither claim is widely recognized internationally
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Pelagianism
PELAGIANISM is the belief that original sin did not taint human nature and that mortal will is still capable of choosing good or evil without special divine aid . This theological theory is named after the British monk Pelagius (354–420 or 440), although he denied, at least at some point in his life, many of the doctrines associated with his name. Pelagius was identified as an Irishman by Saint Jerome . Pelagius taught that the human will, as created with its abilities by God, was sufficient to live a sinless life, although he believed that God's grace assisted every good work. Pelagianism
Pelagianism
has come to be identified with the view (whether taught by Pelagius or not) that human beings can earn salvation by their own efforts
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Caerleon
CAERLEON (/kərˈliːən/ ; Welsh : Caerllion) is a suburban town and community , situated on the River Usk
River Usk
in the northern outskirts of the city of Newport, Wales
Newport, Wales
. Caerleon
Caerleon
is a site of archaeological importance, being the location of a notable Roman legionary fortress , Isca Augusta , and an Iron Age
Iron Age
hillfort . The Wales
Wales
National Roman Legion Museum and Roman Baths Museum are in Caerleon
Caerleon
close to the remains of Isca Augusta
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Brittany
BRITTANY (/ˈbrɪtəni/ ; French: Bretagne ( listen ); Breton : Breizh, pronounced or ; Gallo : Bertaèyn, pronounced ) is a cultural region (see also Brittany (administrative region)
Brittany (administrative region)
) in the north-west of France
France
covering the western part of Armorica , as it was known during the period of Roman occupation. It became an independent kingdom and then a duchy before being united with the Kingdom of France
France
in 1532 as a province governed as if it were a separate nation under the crown. Brittany
Brittany
has also been referred to as Less, Lesser or Little Britain (as opposed to Great Britain
Great Britain
)
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Dumnonia
DUMNONIA is the Latinised name for the Brythonic kingdom in Sub-Roman Britain between the late 4th and late 8th centuries, in what is now the more westerly parts of South West England . It was centred in the area later called Devon
Devon
, but included modern Cornwall
Cornwall
and part of Somerset
Somerset
, with its eastern boundary changing over time as the gradual westward expansion of the neighbouring Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Wessex
Wessex
encroached on its territory. The spelling DAMNONIA is sometimes encountered, but is also used for the land of the Damnonii , later part of the Kingdom of Strathclyde , in what is today southern Scotland
Scotland
. Domnonia also occurs and shares a linguistic relationship with the Breton region of Domnonée
Domnonée
, Breton : Domnonea
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Greek Orthodox Patriarch Of Jerusalem
The GREEK ORTHODOX PATRIARCH OF JERUSALEM or EASTERN ORTHODOX PATRIARCH OF JERUSALEM, officially PATRIARCH OF JERUSALEM, is the head bishop of the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate
Patriarchate
of Jerusalem
Jerusalem
, ranking fourth of nine Patriarchs in the Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church

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Finnian Of Clonard
Saint
Saint
FINNIAN OF CLONARD ('Cluain Eraird') – also FINIAN, FIONáN or FIONNáN in Irish; or VENNIANUS and VINNIAUS in its Latinised form (470–549) – was one of the early Irish monastic saints , who founded Clonard Abbey in modern-day County Meath
County Meath
. The Twelve Apostles of Ireland studied under him. Saint
Saint
Finnian of Clonard
Finnian of Clonard
(along with Saint
Saint
Enda of Aran ) is considered one of the fathers of Irish monasticism
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