HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Poseidon
Poseidon
Poseidon
(/pəˈsaɪdən, pɒ-, poʊ-/;[1] Greek: Ποσειδῶν, pronounced [pose͜edɔ́͜ɔn]) was one of the Twelve Olympians in ancient Greek religion and myth. He was god of the Sea and other waters; of earthquakes; and of horses.[2] In pre-Olympian Bronze Age Greece, he was venerated as a chief deity at Pylos
Pylos
and Thebes.[2] Poseidon
Poseidon
was protector of seafarers, and of many Hellenic cities and colonies. In Homer's Iliad, Poseidon
Poseidon
supports the Greeks against the Trojans during the Trojan War
[...More...]

"Poseidon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Belus (Egyptian)
Belus (Latin) or Belos (Greek: Βῆλος, Bē̂los) was the indifferent classical rendering of the Semitic words bēlu and baʿal ("lord") as a theonym, personal name, and royal title. Belus may refer to:Contents1 In myth and legend 2 Places 3 Other uses 4 See alsoIn myth and legend[edit] Belus (Assyrian), the Babylonian Marduk as a legendary king of Assyria
[...More...]

"Belus (Egyptian)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient Greek Philosophy
Ancient Greek philosophy
Ancient Greek philosophy
arose in the 6th century BC and continued throughout the Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
and the period in which Ancient Greece was part of the Roman Empire. Philosophy
Philosophy
was used to make sense out of the world in a non-religious way. It dealt with a wide variety of subjects, including political philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, ontology, logic, biology, rhetoric and aesthetics.[citation needed] Many philosophers around the world agree that Greek philosophy has influenced much of Western culture
Western culture
since its inception
[...More...]

"Ancient Greek Philosophy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Earth Shaker (video Game)
The United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, more commonly known as the Shakers, is a millenarian restorationist Christian sect founded in the 18th century in England. They were initially known as "Shaking Quakers" because of their ecstatic behavior during worship services. As early as 1747, women assumed leadership roles within the sect, notably Jane Wardley, Mother Ann Lee, and Mother Lucy Wright. Shakers
Shakers
settled in colonial America, with initial settlements in New Lebanon, New York (called Mount Lebanon after 1861). They practice a celibate and communal lifestyle, pacifism, and their model of equality of the sexes, which they institutionalized in their society in the 1780s
[...More...]

"Earth Shaker (video Game)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hellenistic Philosophy
Hellenistic philosophy
Hellenistic philosophy
is the period of Western philosophy
Western philosophy
that was developed in the Hellenistic civilization
Hellenistic civilization
following Aristotle
Aristotle
and ending with the beginning of Neoplatonism.Contents1 Hellenistic schools of thought1.1 Pythagoreanism 1.2 Sophism 1.3 Cynicism 1.4 Cyrenaicism 1.5 Platonism 1.6 Peripateticism 1.7 Pyrrhonism 1.8 Epicureanism 1.9 Stoicism 1.10 Eclecticism 1.11 Hellenistic Judaism 1.12 Neopythagoreanism 1.13 Hellenistic Christianity 1.14 Neoplatonism2 See also 3 Further readingHellenistic schools of thought[edit] Pythagoreanism[edit] Pythagoreanism
Pythagoreanism
is the name given to the system of philosophy and science developed by Pythagoras, which influenced nearly all the systems of Hellenistic philosophy
Hellenistic philosophy
that followed
[...More...]

"Hellenistic Philosophy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Henosis
Henosis
Henosis
(Ancient Greek: ἕνωσις) is the classical Greek word for mystical "oneness", "union" or "unity." In Platonism, and especially Neoplatonism, the goal of henosis is union with what is fundamental in reality: the One (Τὸ Ἕν), the Source, or Monad.[1] The Neoplatonic concept has precedents in the Greek mystery religions[2] as well as parallels in Eastern philosophy.[3] It is further developed in the Corpus Hermeticum, in Christian theology, Alevism, soteriology and mysticism, and is an important factor in the historical development of monotheism during Late Antiquity.Contents1 Etymology 2 Pr
[...More...]

"Henosis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Monism
Monism
Monism
is the view that attributes oneness or singleness (Greek: μόνος) to a concept (e.g., existence)
[...More...]

"Monism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pantheism
Pantheism
Pantheism
is the belief that all reality is identical with divinity,[1] or that everything composes an all-encompassing, immanent god.[2] Pantheists do not believe in a distinct personal or anthropomorphic god[3] and hold a broad range of doctrines differing with regards to the forms of and relationships between divinity and reality.[4] Pantheism
[...More...]

"Pantheism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Orthopraxy
In the study of religion, orthopraxy is correct conduct, both ethical and liturgical, as opposed to faith or grace etc.[1][2][3] This contrasts with orthodoxy, which emphasizes correct belief, and ritualism, the practice of rituals.[4] The word is a neoclassical compound—ὀρθοπραξία (orthopraxia) meaning 'correct practice'. While orthodoxies make use of codified beliefs, in the form of creeds, and ritualism more narrowly centers on the strict adherence to prescribed rites or rituals, orthopraxy is focused on issues of family, cultural integrity, the transmission of tradition, sacrificial offerings, concerns of purity, ethical systems, and the enforcement thereof.[5][6] Typically, traditional or folk religions (paganism, animism) are more concerned with orthopraxy than orthodoxy, and some[who?] argue that equating the term "faith" with "religion" presents a Christian-biased notion of what the primary characteristic of religion is
[...More...]

"Orthopraxy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chiron
In Greek mythology, Chiron
Chiron
(/ˈkaɪrən/ KY-rən; also Cheiron or Kheiron; Greek: Χείρων "hand")[1] was held to be the superlative centaur amongst his brethren, as he was called as the "wisest and justest of all the centaurs".[2]Contents1 Biography 2 Physical appearance 3 Mythology3.1 Early years 3.2 Death4 Students 5 The Precepts of Chiron 6 Statius' Achilleid 7 Gallery 8 References 9 SourcesBiography[edit]Chiron, Peleus
Peleus
and infant Achilles Chiron
Chiron
was notable throughout Greek mythology
Greek mythology
for his youth-nurturing nature
[...More...]

"Chiron" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Polytheism
Polytheism
Polytheism
(from Greek πολυθεϊσμός, polytheismos) is the worship of or belief in multiple deities, which are usually assembled into a pantheon of gods and goddesses, along with their own religions and rituals. In most religions which accept polytheism, the different gods and goddesses are representations of forces of nature or ancestral principles, and can be viewed either as autonomous or as aspects or emanations of a creator deity or transcendental absolute principle (monistic theologies), which manifests immanently in nature (panentheistic and pantheistic theologies).[1] Most of the polytheistic deities of ancient religions, with the notable exceptions of the Ancient Egyptian[2] and Hindu deities, were conceived as having physical bodies. Polytheism
Polytheism
is a type of theism
[...More...]

"Polytheism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aion (deity)
Aion (Greek: Αἰών) is a Hellenistic deity associated with time, the orb or circle encompassing the universe, and the zodiac. The "time" represented by Aion is unbounded, in contrast to Chronos
Chronos
as empirical time divided into past, present, and future.[1] He is thus a god of eternity, associated with mystery religions concerned with the afterlife, such as the mysteries of Cybele, Dionysus, Orpheus, and Mithras
[...More...]

"Aion (deity)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ananke (mythology)
In ancient Greek religion, Ananke (/əˈnæŋki/; Greek: Ἀνάγκη, from the common noun ἀνάγκη, "force, constraint, necessity"), is a personification of inevitability, compulsion and necessity. She is often depicted as holding a spindle. One of the Greek primordial deities, Ananke marks the beginning of the cosmos, along with her father and consort, Chronos
Chronos
(the personification of Time, not the child-eating Titan Cronus)
[...More...]

"Ananke (mythology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chaos (mythology)
Chaos (Greek χάος, khaos) refers to the formless or void state preceding the creation of the universe or cosmos in the Greek creation myths, or to the initial "gap" created by the original separation of heaven and earth.[1][2][3] In Hesiod's Theogony
Theogony
(c
[...More...]

"Chaos (mythology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hemera
In Greek mythology
Greek mythology
Hemera
Hemera
(/ˈhɛmərə/; Ancient Greek: Ἡμέρα [hɛːméra] "Day") was the personification of day and one of the Greek primordial deities
[...More...]

"Hemera" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aether (mythology)
In Greek mythology, Aether (/ˈiːθər/; Ancient Greek: Αἰθήρ Aither pronounced [aitʰɛ̌ːr]) was one of the primordial deities. Aether is the personification of the upper air.[1] He embodies the pure upper air that the gods breathe, as opposed to the normal air (ἀήρ, aer) breathed by mortals. Like Tartarus
Tartarus
and Erebus, Aether may have had shrines in ancient Greece, but he had no temples and is unlikely to have had a cult.Contents1 Mythology1.1 Hesiod 1.2 Hyginus 1.3 Orphic Hymns2 See also 3 Notes 4 ReferencesMythology[edit] Hesiod[edit] In Hesiod's Theogony, Aether (Light), was the son of Erebus
Erebus
(Darkness) and Nyx
Nyx
(Night), and the brother of Hemera
Hemera
(Day).[2] Hyginus[edit] The Roman mythographer Hyginus, says Aether was the son of Chaos and Caligo (Darkness).[3] According to Jan Bremmer,[4]Hyginus ..
[...More...]

"Aether (mythology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.