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Pennsylvania Railroad
The Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Railroad
Railroad
(reporting mark PRR) (or Pennsylvania Railroad
Railroad
Company and also known as the "Pennsy") was an American Class I railroad that was established in 1846 and was headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was called the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Railroad because it was established in the state of Pennsylvania. The PRR was the largest railroad by traffic and revenue in the U.S. for the first half of the 20th century. Over the years, it acquired, merged with or owned part of at least 800 other rail lines and companies.[1] At the end of 1925, it operated 10,515 miles of rail line;[2] in the 1920s, it carried nearly three times the traffic as other railroads of comparable length, such as the Union Pacific or Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroads
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Separate System
The separate system is a form of prison management based on the principle of keeping prisoners in solitary confinement. When first introduced in the early 19th century, the objective of such a prison or "penitentiary" was that of penance by the prisoners through silent reflection upon their crimes and behavior, as much as that of prison security. More commonly however, the term "separate system" is used to refer to a specific type of prison architecture built to support such a system.Contents1 Eastern State Penitentiary: Basis for many 19th-century prisons 2 Other elements 3 In popular culture 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingEastern State Penitentiary: Basis for many 19th-century prisons[edit]Eastern State PenitentiaryThe first prison built according to the separate system was the Eastern State Penitentiary
Eastern State Penitentiary
in 1829 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
in the United States
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West Virginia
West Virginia
Virginia
/- vərˈdʒɪniə/ ( listen) is a state located in the Appalachian region of the Southern United States.[7][8][9][10][11] It is bordered by Virginia
Virginia
to the southeast, Kentucky
Kentucky
to the southwest, Ohio
Ohio
to the northwest, and Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and Maryland
Maryland
to the northeast. West Virginia
Virginia
is the 10th smallest by area, and is ranked 38th in population. The capital and largest city is Charleston. West Virginia
Virginia
became a state following the Wheeling Conventions of 1861, after the American Civil War
American Civil War
had begun
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Chesapeake And Ohio Canal
The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, abbreviated as the C&O Canal
Canal
and occasionally called the "Grand Old Ditch,"[1] operated from 1831 until 1924 along the Potomac River
Potomac River
from Washington, D.C., to Cumberland, Maryland. The canal's principal cargo was coal from the Allegheny Mountains. Construction on the 184.5-mile (296.9 km) canal began in 1828 and ended in 1850 with the completion of a 50-mile stretch to Cumberland. Rising and falling over an elevation change of 605 feet (184 meters), it required the construction of 74 canal locks, 11 aqueducts to cross major streams, more than 240 culverts to cross smaller streams, and the 3,118 ft (950 m) Paw Paw Tunnel
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Erie Canal
The Erie Canal
Canal
is a canal in New York, United States
United States
that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal
Canal
System (formerly known as the New York State Barge
Barge
Canal). Originally, it ran 363 miles (584 km) from where Albany meets the Hudson River
Hudson River
to where Buffalo meets Lake Erie. It was built to create a navigable water route from New York City
New York City
and the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the Great Lakes. When completed in 1825, it was the second longest canal in the world (after the Grand Canal
Canal
in China) and greatly affected the development and economy of New York, New York City, and the United States.[2] The canal was first proposed in the 1780s, then re-proposed in 1807
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Funicular
A funicular (/fəˈnɪkjʊlər/) is one of the modes of transport, along with a cable railway and an inclined elevator, which uses a cable traction for movement on a steep slope. A pair of vehicles are pulled on a slope by a cable which loops over a pulley wheel at the upper end of a track. While one vehicle is ascending the other one is descending the track and thus they are counterbalancing each other. Both vehicles are permanently attached to a cable, which distinguishes them from a cable railway.[1] Funiculars of one type or another have existed for hundreds of years, and they continue to be used for moving both passengers and goods
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Conemaugh River
The Conemaugh River
Conemaugh River
is a 70-mile (110 km) long tributary of the Kiskiminetas River
Kiskiminetas River
in Westmoreland, Indiana, and Cambria counties in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Pennsylvania.[1] It crosses both the Pittsburgh metropolitan area and the Johnstown, Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
metropolitan area. The name means 'Otter Creek', originating from the Unami-Lenape language word kwənəmuxkw 'otter'.[2][3][4]Contents1 Course 2 Watershed 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksCourse[edit] Conemaugh River
Conemaugh River
Lake Dam near Saltsburg, PennsylvaniaThe Conemaugh River
Conemaugh River
is formed at Johnstown in southwestern Cambria County by the confluence of the Little Conemaugh and Stonycreek rivers
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Allegheny River
The Allegheny River
River
(/ˌæləˈɡeɪni/ AL-ə-GAY-nee) is a principal tributary of the Ohio River; it is located in the Eastern United States. The Allegheny River
River
joins with the Monongahela River
Monongahela River
to form the Ohio River
Ohio River
at the "Point" of Point State Park
Point State Park
in Downtown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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Railroad
Rail transport
Rail transport
is a means of transferring of passengers and goods on wheeled vehicles running on rails, also known as tracks. It is also commonly referred to as train transport. In contrast to road transport, where vehicles run on a prepared flat surface, rail vehicles (rolling stock) are directionally guided by the tracks on which they run. Tracks usually consist of steel rails, installed on ties (sleepers) and ballast, on which the rolling stock, usually fitted with metal wheels, moves
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Eastern State Penitentiary
The Eastern State Penitentiary, also known as ESP, is a former American prison
American prison
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[5] It is located at 2027 Fairmount Avenue between Corinthian Avenue and North 22nd Street in the Fairmount section of the city, and was operational from 1829 until 1971. The penitentiary refined the revolutionary system of separate incarceration first pioneered at the Walnut Street Jail
Walnut Street Jail
which emphasized principles of reform rather than punishment.[6] Notorious criminals such as Al Capone
Al Capone
and bank robber Willie Sutton were held inside its innovative wagon wheel design
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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Railway Electrification System
A railway electrification system supplies electric power to railway trains and trams without an on-board prime mover or local fuel supply. Electric railways use electric locomotives to haul passengers or freight in separate cars or electric multiple units, passenger cars with their own motors. Electricity is typically generated in large and relatively efficient generating stations, transmitted to the railway network and distributed to the trains. Some electric railways have their own dedicated generating stations and transmission lines but most purchase power from an electric utility. The railway usually provides its own distribution lines, switches and transformers. Power is supplied to moving trains with a (nearly) continuous conductor running along the track that usually takes one of two forms: overhead line, suspended from poles or towers along the track or from structure or tunnel ceilings; third rail mounted at track level and contacted by a sliding "pickup shoe"
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Standard Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t eA standard-gauge railway is a railway with a track gauge of 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in). The standard gauge is also called Stephenson gauge after George Stephenson, International gauge, UIC gauge, uniform gauge, normal gauge and European gauge in the EU and Russia.[1][2][3][4][5] It is the most widely used railway track gauge across the world with approximately 55% of the lines in the world using it. All high-speed rail lines, except those in Russia, Finland, Portugal and Uzbekistan, utilise standard gauge
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Ohio River
The Ohio
Ohio
River, which streams westward from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to Cairo, Illinois, is the largest tributary, by volume, of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
in the United States. At the confluence, the Ohio
Ohio
is considerably bigger than the Mississippi
Mississippi
( Ohio
Ohio
at Cairo: 281,500 cu ft/s (7,960 m3/s);[2] Mississippi
Mississippi
at Thebes: 208,200 cu ft/s (5,897 m3/s)[3]) and, thus, is hydrologically the main stream of the whole river system. The 981-mile (1,579 km) river flows through or along the border of six states, and its drainage basin includes parts of 15 states. Through its largest tributary, the Tennessee River, the basin includes many of the states of the southeastern U.S
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Commonwealth Of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
(/ˌpɛnsɪlˈveɪniə/ ( listen); Pennsylvania German: Pennsylvaani or Pennsilfaani), officially the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, is a state located in the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic regions of the United States. The Appalachian Mountains
Appalachian Mountains
run through its middle. The Commonwealth is bordered by Delaware
Delaware
to the southeast, Maryland
Maryland
to the south, West Virginia
West Virginia
to the southwest, Ohio
Ohio
to the west, Lake Erie
Lake Erie
and the Canadian province of Ontario
Ontario
to the northwest, New York to the north, and New Jersey
New Jersey
to the east. Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
is the 33rd-largest, the 5th-most populous, and the 9th-most densely populated of the 50 United States
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Track Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t ePart of a series onRail transportOperations Track Maintenance High-speed railways Track gauge Stations Trains Locomotives Rolling stock Companies History Attractions Terminology (AU, NA, NZ, UK) By country Accidents Railway couplings Couplers by country Coupler conversion Track gauge Variable gauge Gauge conversion Dual gauge Wheelset Bogie
Bogie
(truck) Dual coupling Rail subsidiesModellingv t eIn rail transport, track gauge is the spacing of the rails on a railway track and is measured between the inner faces of the load-bearing rails. All vehicles on a rail network must have running gear that is compatible with the track gauge, and in the earliest days of railways the selection of a proposed railway's gauge was a key issue
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