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PRR Q2
The Pennsylvania Railroad
Pennsylvania Railroad
's class Q2 comprised one prototype and twenty-five production duplex steam locomotives of 4-4-6-4 wheel arrangement . Front angle view of a Q2. They were the largest non-articulated locomotives ever built and the most powerful locomotives ever static tested, producing 7,987 cylinder horsepower (5,956 kW ) on the PRR's static test plant. They were by far the most successful duplex type. The duplex propensity to slip was combated by an automatic slip control mechanism that reduced power to the slipping unit. The Q2 locomotive was 78% more powerful than the locomotives that PRR had in service at the time, and the company claimed the Q2 could pull 125 freight cars at a speed of 50 mph (80 km/h)
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Pennsylvania Railroad Class D3
The Pennsylvania Railroad 's steam locomotive class D3 (formerly Class C, pre-1895) comprised sixty-seven 4-4-0 locomotives intended for general passenger and freight service , constructed at the railroad's own Altoona Works during 1869–1881. They were the third standardized class of locomotives on the railroad and the most numerous of the early standard types; they shared many parts with other standard classes. This design differed from the Class A (later D1) mainly in its smaller drivers for greater tractive effort for freight haulage. Like all the early standardized 4-4-0s on the PRR, the Class C had a wagon-top boiler with steam dome and a firebox between the two driving axles. REFERENCES * ^ A B C D E F G H I J K L Pennsylvania Railroad. "Class D3 diagram". PRR.Railfan.net. Retrieved 2014-01-08. * ^ A B "PRR Steam Roster". Northeast Rails. Retrieved 2014-01-08. * ^ Dredge, James (1879). The Pennsylvania Railroad. London: Engineering magazine
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Pennsylvania Railroad Class D2
The Pennsylvania Railroad 's steam locomotive class D2 (formerly Class B, pre-1895) comprised twenty 4-4-0 locomotives intended for mountain passenger helper service , constructed at the railroad's own Altoona Works during 1869–1880. They were the second standardized class of locomotives on the railroad and shared many parts with other standard classes. This design differed from the Class A (later D1) mainly in its smaller drivers for greater tractive effort in mountainous terrain. Like all the early standardized 4-4-0s on the PRR, the Class B had a wagon-top boiler with steam dome and a firebox between the two driving axles. In 1881, the PRR took the Class B design and modified it to produce more locomotives for express passenger service, with 68-inch (1,727 mm) drivers like the earlier Class A. These new locomotives were designated CLASS B A, and were classified as B2A in the post-1895 scheme; forty-five of them were constructed
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Pennsylvania Railroad Class D4
The Pennsylvania Railroad 's steam locomotive class D4 (formerly Class C (ANTHRACITE), pre-1895) comprised thirty-seven anthracite-burning 4-4-0 locomotives intended for general passenger and freight service on the PRR's New Jersey lines, constructed at the railroad's own Altoona Works during 1873–1890. They shared many parts with other standard classes. This design differed from the Class C (later D3) mainly in its longer firebox to burn slower-burning anthracite coal. Like all the early standardized 4-4-0s on the PRR, the Class C (Anthracite) had a wagon-top boiler with steam dome and a firebox between the two driving axles. In 1875, fifteen locomotives were either built or converted (sources differ) with 68-inch (1,727 mm) drivers for fast passenger service on the New Jersey lines. These were classified Class CA (ANTHRACITE) or later D4A, and handled this traffic until 1881, when they were replaced by heavier power
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Pennsylvania Railroad Class D5
The Pennsylvania Railroad 's steam locomotive class D5 (formerly Class G, pre-1895) comprised eighteen lightweight 4-4-0 locomotives for light duty, maintenance-of-way and branch-line service, constructed at the railroad's own Altoona Works during 1870–1873. They shared many parts with other standard classes, although less so with the heavy 4-4-0s on account of their lighter build; instead, they shared some components with 0-6-0 switcher classes F and H (later B1 and B2 ). The Class G locomotives had a straight-topped boiler, unlike the wagon-top of the other 4-4-0 classes. REFERENCES * ^ A B C D E F G H I J K L Pennsylvania Railroad. "PRR D5 Diagram". PRR.Railfan.net. Retrieved 2008-08-25. * ^ "PRR Steam Roster". Northeast Rails. Retrieved 2007-12-31. * ^ Dredge, James (1879). The Pennsylvania Railroad. London: Engineering magazine
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Pennsylvania Railroad Class D6
Class D6 (formerly Class K, pre-1895) on the Pennsylvania Railroad was a class of 4-4-0 steam locomotive . Nineteen were built by the PRR's Altoona Works between 1881–1883. They were equipped with 78-inch (1,981 mm) drivers. Seven were later converted to 72-inch (1,829 mm) drivers and classified D6A. The D6 was one of the first American 4-4-0s to place the firebox above, rather than between, the locomotive\'s frames . This added about 8 inches to the possible width of the firebox, enabling a larger, easier to fire and more powerful locomotive; the maximum fire grate area increased to about 35 sq ft (3.25 m2) from the previous maximum of about 18 sq ft (1.67 m2). The innovation was not wholly new, having been first seen on the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad 's 1859 Vera Cruz, designed by James Milholland of that road and built in their own shops; the Reading used this design until the invention of the Wootten firebox in 1877
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Pennsylvania Railroad Class D1
The Pennsylvania Railroad 's steam locomotive class D1 (formerly Class A, pre-1895) comprised thirteen 4-4-0 locomotives for express passenger service , constructed at the railroad's own Altoona Works during 1868–1872. They were the first standardized class of locomotives on the railroad and shared many parts with other standard classes. PRR D1 fitted with experimental Westinghouse air brake equipment during the trials of September 1869. The PRR was the first American railroad to adopt the Westinghouse air brake , the first tests of which were made in September 1869; Class A locomotives were among those fitted with air brake equipment for those earliest tests. REFERENCES * ^ A B C Dredge, James (1879). The Pennsylvania Railroad. London: Engineering magazine. * ^ A B C D E F G H I J Pennsylvania Railroad. "Class D1 diagram". PRR.Railfan.net. Retrieved 2008-08-19. * ^ "PRR Steam Roster". Northeast Rails. Retrieved 2007-12-31. * ^ Staufer, Alvin F
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4-4-0
Under the Whyte notation
Whyte notation
for the classification of steam locomotives by wheel arrangement , 4-4-0
4-4-0
represents the arrangement of four leading wheels on two axles, usually in a leading bogie , four powered and coupled driving wheels on two axles, and no trailing wheels . Almost every major railroad that operated in North America
North America
in the first half of the 19th century owned and operated locomotives of this type. Due to the large number of the type that were produced and used in the United States, the 4-4-0
4-4-0
is most commonly known as the AMERICAN type, but the type subsequently also became popular in the United Kingdom, where large numbers were produced
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Pennsylvania Railroad Class B6
The Pennsylvania Railroad 's class B6 was its most successful class of switcher , or as the PRR termed them, "shifter". The PRR preferred the 0-6-0 wheel arrangement for larger switchers, whereas on other roads the 0-8-0 gained preference. The PRR used road locomotives , generally 2-8-0s , when larger power was required. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Notes * 3 References * 4 External links HISTORYAltoona Works constructed the prototype B6 in 1902. The B6 had the Pennsylvania's trademark square-shouldered Belpaire firebox and 56-inch (1.422 m) drivers. They were constructed as saturated steam engines, rebuilt with superheaters later as class B6S, and had Piston valves and Stephenson valve gear . A total of 79 were built by Baldwin and Lima , in addition to Altoona, between 1902–1913. The next version built was the B6SA, 55 of which were built at Altoona during 1913–1914
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Pennsylvania Railroad Class B1
The Pennsylvania Railroad 's class B1 comprised 42 switcher -type electric locomotives built between 1926 and 1935 . They were of 0-6-0 wheel arrangement in the Whyte notation with 700 horsepower. As built, the first 28 locomotives in the 1926 order formed semi-permanently coupled pairs grouped in three classes. The first, class BB1, were AC powered and served as prototypes. The second, class BB2, were DC powered and served in the New York Terminal district, specifically between Sunnyside Yard and New York Penn Station . The third, class BB3, was AC powered and built for the Long Island Rail Road 's electrified freight operation on the Bay Ridge Branch . In 1934 a follow-up order of 14 locomotives were built as single unit class B1 for the expanding main line AC electrification system
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0-8-0
Under the Whyte notation
Whyte notation
for the classification of steam locomotives , 0-8-0
0-8-0
represents the wheel arrangement of no leading wheels , eight powered and coupled driving wheels on four axles and no trailing wheels . Locomotives of this type are also referred to as EIGHT COUPLED. CONTENTS * 1 Overview * 2 Usage * 2.1 Austria * 2.2 China * 2.3 Christmas Island
Christmas Island
* 2.4 Germany
Germany
* 2.5 Russia * 2.6 South Africa * 2.7 United Kingdom * 2.8 United States of America * 3 References * 4 External links OVERVIEWExamples of the 0-8-0
0-8-0
wheel arrangement were constructed both as tender and tank locomotives . The earliest locomotives were built for mainline haulage, particularly for freight , but the configuration was later also often used for large switcher (shunter ) types
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Pennsylvania Railroad Class C1
The PRR C1 was the Pennsylvania Railroad 's class of 0-8-0 steam locomotive, used in switching service. The 0-8-0 was common on most railroads, but not on PRR; when the railroad needed bigger motive power, they used the 2-8-0 "Consolidation". PRR wanted the best motive power to handle the switching chores at yards and interchanges and the C1 class was the heaviest two-cylinder 0-8-0 switcher ever produced. Calculated tractive effort was 76154 lb, based on 78% MEP with 60% maximum cutoff. The C1s were retired between 1948 and 1953. None survive today
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Pennsylvania Railroad Class D7
Class D7 (formerly Class A (ANTHRACITE), pre-1895) on the Pennsylvania Railroad was a class of 4-4-0 steam locomotive . Fifty-eight were built by the PRR's Altoona Works between 1882–1891 with 68 in (1.73 m) drivers, while sixty-one of class D7A were constructed with 62 in (1.57 m) drivers. The D7 was fundamentally an anthracite -burning version of the PRR D6 , with a larger fire-grate in order to burn the slower-burning, harder coal. REFERENCES * ^ A B C D E "PRR Steam Roster". Northeast Rails. Retrieved 2007-12-31. * ^ A B C D E Pennsylvania Railroad. "D7 Diagram". PRR.Railfan.net. Retrieved 2008-08-17. * ^ A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R Pennsylvania Railroad. "D7a Diagram". PRR.Railfan.net. Retrieved 2008-08-17. * ^ Staufer, Alvin F. & Pennypacker, Bert (1962). Pennsy Power: Steam and Electric Locomotives of the Pennsylvania Railroad, 1900–1957. Staufer. LCCN 62020878 . * ^ Warner, Paul T. (1924)
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Pennsylvania Railroad Class D14
Class D14 on the Pennsylvania Railroad was a type of steam locomotive with a 4-4-0 wheel arrangement in the Whyte notation . They were originally designated class P in the PRR's pre-1895 classification scheme. Twenty-two locomotives were built; six in 1893 with 78-inch (1,981 mm) driving wheels , and sixteen in 1894 with 80-inch (2,032 mm) drivers, classified D14A. Later, all sixteen class D14a were rebuilt to class D14B with 68-inch (1,727 mm) drivers for secondary service after they were replaced in top-flight express service, while three of the six class D14 were similarly rebuilt to class D14C. REFERENCES * ^ A B C D E F Chamberlin, Clint. "PRR Steam Roster". Northeast Rails. Retrieved 2007-12-30. * ^ A B C D E Pennsylvania Railroad. "PRR D14 Diagram". PRR.Railfan.net. Retrieved 2007-12-31. * ^ Staufer, Alvin F. & Pennypacker, Bert (1962). Pennsy Power: Steam and Electric Locomotives of the Pennsylvania Railroad, 1900–1957. Staufer. LCCN 62020878
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Pennsylvania Railroad Class E7
The Pennsylvania Railroad 's class E2, E3, E7 steam locomotives were of the 4-4-2 "Atlantic" passenger type, frequently called “light Atlantics” after the introduction of the heavier E6 Atlantics. All were similar in size and boiler capacity but differed in firebox type, valves and valve gear, and cylinder diameter. Classes E2 and E3 were built simultaneously. Starting in 1916 a rebuilding program converted ninety class E2a,b,c to class E7s by replacing slide valves with piston valves and increasing cylinder diameter from 20.5 to 22.5 inches (520 to 570 mm). Fourteen class E2 were similarly converted to class E7sa. Ninety class E2a,d, E3a,d were converted to class E3sd. These improvements allowed many of the engines to remain in active service into the 1930s
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Pennsylvania Railroad Class E6
Class E6 on the Pennsylvania Railroad was the final type of 4-4-2 "Atlantic" locomotive built by the railroad, and second only to the Milwaukee Road 's streamlined class A in size, speed and power. Although quickly ceding top-flight trains to the larger K4s Pacifics, the E6 remained a popular locomotive on lesser services and some lasted to the end of steam on the PRR. One, #460 , called the Lindbergh Engine, is preserved at the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania . It was moved indoors to begin preparations for restoration on March 17, 2010. On January 10, 2011, PRR #460 was moved to the museum's restoration shop for a two- to three-year project, estimated to cost $350,000. The engine is listed in the National Register of Historic Places . CONTENTS * 1 Design * 2 Prototypes and testing * 3 Production and service * 4 Lindbergh run * 5 References DESIGNThe E6 was designed by the Pennsy's General Superintendent of Motive Power, Lines East, Alfred W
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