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Oyster Sauce
OYSTER SAUCE describes a number of sauces made by cooking oysters . The most common in modern use is a viscous dark brown condiment made from oyster extracts, sugar, salt and water thickened with corn starch . Some versions may be darkened with caramel , though high-quality oyster sauce is naturally dark. It is commonly used in Cantonese
Cantonese
, Thai , Vietnamese and Khmer cuisine . CONTENTS * 1 Development * 2 Production * 3 Culinary use * 4 Varieties * 4.1 Vegetarian oyster sauce * 4.2 Non-MSG oyster sauce * 5 European oyster sauce * 6 Health * 7 See also * 8 References * 9 External links DEVELOPMENT Oyster
Oyster
sauce is an invention by Lee Kum Sheung in Nanshui , Zhuhai
Zhuhai
of Guangdong
Guangdong
Province in China
China
in 1888. He ran a tea stall that sold cooked oysters
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Production Line
A PRODUCTION LINE is a set of sequential operations established in a factory where materials are put through a refining process to produce an end-product that is suitable for onward consumption; or components are assembled to make a finished article. Typically, raw materials such as metal ores or agricultural products such as foodstuffs or textile source plants (cotton , flax ) require a sequence of treatments to render them useful. For metal, the processes include crushing, smelting and further refining. For plants, the useful material has to be separated from husks or contaminants and then treated for onward sale
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Umami
UMAMI (/uˈmɑːmi/ ), or SAVORY taste, is one of the five basic tastes (together with sweetness , sourness , bitterness , and saltiness ). It has been described as brothy or meaty. People taste umami through taste receptors that typically respond to glutamate . Glutamate is widely present in meat broths and fermented products, and commonly added to some foods in the form of monosodium glutamate (MSG). Since umami has its own receptors rather than arising out of a combination of the traditionally recognized taste receptors, scientists now consider umami to be a distinct taste. CONTENTS * 1 Etymology * 2 Background * 3 Discovery * 4 Properties * 5 Foods rich in umami components * 6 Taste
Taste
receptors * 7 Consumers and safety * 8 References * 9 Further reading * 10 External links ETYMOLOGYA loanword from the Japanese (うま味), umami can be translated as "pleasant savory taste"
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Shandong Cuisine
SHANDONG CUISINE (山東菜), more commonly known in Chinese as LU CUISINE, is one of the Eight Culinary Traditions of Chinese cuisine and one of the Four Great Traditions (四大菜系). It is derived from the native cooking style of Shandong Province , a northern coastal province of China. CONTENTS * 1 Features * 2 Styles * 3 Influence * 4 Ingredients * 4.1 Maize
Maize
* 4.2 Peanuts * 4.3 Grains * 4.4 Staple vegetables * 4.5 Vinegar * 5 Subgroups of Shandong cuisine * 6 See also * 7 References FEATURES Shandong cuisine is famous for its wide selection of material and use of different cooking methods. The raw materials are mainly domestic animals and birds, seafood and vegetables
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Corn Starch
CORN STARCH, CORNSTARCH, CORNFLOUR or MAIZE STARCH or MAIZE is the starch derived from the corn (maize ) grain or wheat. The starch is obtained from the endosperm of the kernel . Corn starch
Corn starch
is a popular food ingredient used in thickening sauces or soups , and is used in making corn syrup and other sugars . CONTENTS * 1 Physical properties * 2 History * 3 Use * 3.1 Culinary * 3.2 Chemistry * 3.3 Medical * 4 Manufacture * 5 Accident * 6 Names and varieties * 7 See also * 8 References * 9 External links PHYSICAL PROPERTIESWhen mixed with a fluid, cornstarch can rearrange itself into a non-Newtonian fluid . For example, adding water transforms cornstarch into a material commonly known as Oobleck while adding oil transforms cornstarch into a Electrorheological fluid . The concept can be explained through the mixture termed "cornflour slime"
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Traditional Chinese Characters
TRADITIONAL CHINESE CHARACTERS (traditional Chinese: 正體字/繁體字; simplified Chinese : 正体字/繁体字; Pinyin : Zhèngtǐzì/Fántĭzì) are Chinese characters
Chinese characters
in any character set that does not contain newly created characters or character substitutions performed after 1946. They are most commonly the characters in the standardized character sets of Taiwan
Taiwan
, of Hong Kong and Macau
Macau
or in the Kangxi Dictionary
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China
CHINA, officially the PEOPLE\'S REPUBLIC OF CHINA (PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world\'s most populous country , with a population of around 1.404 billion . Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area, depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world. Governed by the Communist Party of China
Communist Party of China
, it exercises jurisdiction over 22 provinces , five autonomous regions , four direct-controlled municipalities ( Beijing
Beijing
, Tianjin
Tianjin
, Shanghai
Shanghai
, and Chongqing
Chongqing
), and the special administrative regions of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
and Macau
Macau

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Odor
An ODOR or ODOUR or FRAGRANCE is caused by one or more volatilized chemical compounds , generally at a very low concentration, that humans or other animals perceive by the sense of olfaction . Odors are also commonly called SCENTS, which can refer to both pleasant and unpleasant odors. The terms FRAGRANCE and AROMA are used primarily by the food and cosmetic industry to describe a pleasant odor, and are sometimes used to refer to perfumes , and to describe floral scent . In contrast, MALODOR, STENCH, REEK, and STINK are used specifically to describe unpleasant odor. The term SMELL (in its noun form) is used for both pleasant and unpleasant odors. In the United Kingdom, odour refers to scents in general. In the United States and for many non-native English speakers around the world, odor generally has a negative connotation, as a synonym for stink; on the other hand, scent or aroma are used by those people to indicate "pleasant smells"
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Automation
IEEE Robotics and Automation
Automation
Award ------------------------- ROBOTS Industrial robot Autonomous research robot
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Sichuan Cuisine
SICHUAN CUISINE, SZECHWAN CUISINE, or SZECHUAN CUISINE (四川菜) (/ˈsɛʃwɒn/ or /ˈsɛtʃwɒn/ ), alternatively known as CHUAN CUISINE, is a style of Chinese cuisine
Chinese cuisine
originating from Sichuan Province in southwestern China
China
. It has bold flavours, particularly the pungency and spiciness resulting from liberal use of garlic and chili peppers , as well as the unique flavour of Sichuan
Sichuan
pepper . There are many local variations within Sichuan
Sichuan
Province and the neighbouring Chongqing
Chongqing
Municipality , which was part of Sichuan Province until 1997. Four sub-styles of Sichuan
Sichuan
cuisine include Chongqing, Chengdu
Chengdu
, Zigong and Buddhist
Buddhist
vegetarian style
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Seafood
SEAFOOD is any form of sea life regarded as food by humans. Seafood prominently includes fish and shellfish . Shellfish include various species of molluscs , crustaceans , and echinoderms . Historically, sea mammals such as whales and dolphins have been consumed as food, though that happens to a lesser extent in modern times. Edible sea plants, such as some seaweeds and microalgae , are widely eaten as seafood around the world, especially in Asia (see the category of sea vegetables ). In North America , although not generally in the United Kingdom , the term "seafood" is extended to fresh water organisms eaten by humans, so all edible aquatic life may be referred to as seafood. For the sake of completeness, this article includes all edible aquatic life. The harvesting of wild seafood is usually known as fishing or hunting , and the cultivation and farming of seafood is known as aquaculture , or fish farming in the case of fish
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Yum Cha
YUM CHA (simplified Chinese : 饮茶 yǐn chá ; traditional Chinese : 飲茶; Jyutping
Jyutping
: yam2 cha4; Cantonese
Cantonese
Yale : yám chà; lit. "drink tea"), is the Cantonese
Cantonese
tradition of brunch involving Chinese tea and dim sum . The practice is popular in Cantonese
Cantonese
-speaking regions in China
China
, including the southern provinces of Guangdong
Guangdong
and the special administrative regions of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
and Macau
Macau
. It is also carried out in other regions worldwide where there are overseas Chinese communities. Yum cha
Yum cha
generally involves small portions of steamed , pan-fried , and deep-fried dim sum dishes served in bamboo steamers , which are designed to be eaten communally and washed down with tea
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Har Gow
HA GOW (sometimes anglicized as "har gow"; Chinese : 蝦餃; Jyutping : haa1 gaau2; Cantonese
Cantonese
Yale : hā gáau; pinyin : xiā jiǎo) is a traditional Cantonese
Cantonese
dumpling served in dim sum . CONTENTS * 1 Name * 2 Description * 3 See also * 4 References NAMEThe dumpling is sometimes called a SHRIMP BONNET for its pleated shape. This dish is often served together with siumaai ; when served in such a manner the two items are collectively referred to as hagaau-siumaai (Chinese : 蝦餃燒賣; Cantonese
Cantonese
Yale : hāgáau sīumáai; pinyin : xiājiǎo shāomài). DESCRIPTIONThese shrimp dumplings are transparent and smooth. The prawn dumplings first appeared in Guangzhou
Guangzhou
outskirts near the creek bazaar Deli. This dish is said to be the one that the skill of a dim sum chef is judged on
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Daikon Cake
TURNIP CAKE (simplified Chinese : 萝卜糕; traditional Chinese : 蘿蔔糕; pinyin : luóbo gāo; Cantonese Yale : lòbaahk gōu) is a Chinese dim sum dish made of shredded radish (typically Chinese radish ) and plain rice flour . The less commonly used RADISH CAKE is a more accurate name, in that Western-style turnips are not used in the dish. It is traditionally called CARROT CAKE in Singapore; the Chinese word for 'radish' and 'carrot' being the same. It is commonly served in Cantonese yum cha and is usually cut into rectangular slices and sometimes pan-fried before serving. Each pan-fried cake has a thin crunchy layer on the outside from frying, and is soft on the inside. The non-fried version is soft all over. It is one of the standard dishes found in the dim sum cuisine of Hong Kong and China as well as overseas Chinatown restaurants
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Lo Mein
LO MEIN (simplified Chinese : 捞面; traditional Chinese : 撈麵; Cantonese
Cantonese
Yale : lou1 min6; pinyin : lāo miàn) is a Chinese dish with wheat flour noodles . It often contains vegetables and some type of meat or seafood , usually beef , chicken , pork , shrimp or wontons . It can also be eaten with just vegetables. Traditionally this is a variation of wonton noodle soup. The soup is simply separated from the noodles and other ingredients, and served on the side. CONTENTS * 1 Etymology * 2 American Chinese cuisine
Chinese cuisine
* 3 Gallery * 4 See also * 5 References ETYMOLOGYThe term lo mein comes from the Cantonese
Cantonese
lou1 min6 (撈麵), meaning “stirred noodles”
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Hainanese Chicken Rice
HAINANESE CHICKEN RICE is a dish adapted from early Chinese immigrants originally from Hainan province in southern China. It is considered one of the national dishes of Singapore. Hainanese chicken rice is most commonly associated with Singaporean , Malaysian and Hainanese cuisines, although it is also popular in Thailand , where it's known as Khao Man Gai, Vietnam and Indonesia . It is based on a well-known Hainanese dish called Wenchang chicken (文昌雞), due to its adoption by the Hainanese overseas Chinese population in the Nanyang area (present-day Southeast Asia ). Catherine Ling of CNN describes Hainanese chicken rice as one of the "40 Singapore foods we can't live without". It also listed at number 45 on World's 50 most delicious foods compiled by CNN Go in 2011
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