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Ordinary Time
Ordinary Time
Ordinary Time
refers to two periods of time in the Christian liturgical year that are found in the calendar of the ordinary form of the Roman Rite
Roman Rite
of the Catholic Church, as well as some other churches
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Lutheran Church
Lutheranism
Lutheranism
is a major branch of Protestant
Protestant
Christianity
Christianity
which identifies with the theology of Martin Luther
Martin Luther
(1483–1546), a German friar, ecclesiastical reformer and theologian. Luther's efforts to reform the theology and practice of the Catholic Church launched the Protestant Reformation
Protestant Reformation
in the German-speaking territories of the Holy Roman Empire
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Moveable Feast
A moveable feast or movable feast is an observance in a Christian liturgical calendar that occurs on a different date (relative to the dominant civil or solar calendar) in different years.[1] The most important set of moveable feasts are a fixed number of days before or after Easter Sunday, which varies by over 40 days since it depends partly on the phase of the moon and must be computed each year. In Eastern Christianity
Eastern Christianity
(including the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Oriental Orthodox Churches, the Assyrian Church of the East, and the Eastern Catholic Churches), these moveable feasts form what is called the Paschal cycle, which stands in contrast to the approach taken by Catholic and Protestant Christianity. Most other feast days, such as those of particular saints, are fixed feasts, held on the same date every year
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Methodist Church
Methodism
Methodism
or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant
Protestant
Christianity
Christianity
which derive their inspiration from the life and teachings of John Wesley, an Anglican minister in England. George Whitefield
George Whitefield
and John Wesley's brother Charles Wesley
Charles Wesley
were also significant early leaders in the movement. It originated as a revival within the 18th century Church of England
Church of England
and became a separate denomination after Wesley's death. The movement spread throughout the British Empire, the United States, and beyond because of vigorous missionary work,[1] today claiming approximately 80 million adherents worldwide.[2][nb 1] Wesley's theology focused on sanctification and the effect of faith on the character of a Christian
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Anglican Communion
The Anglican
Anglican
Communion is the third largest Christian communion with 85 million members,[1][2] founded in 1867 in London, England. It consists of the Church of England
England
and national and regional Anglican episcopal polities in full communion with it,[3] with traditional origins of their doctrines summarised in the Thirty-nine Articles (1571). Archbishop
Archbishop
Justin Welby
Justin Welby
of Canterbury
Canterbury
acts as a focus of unity, recognised as primus inter pares ("first among equals"), but does not exercise authority in the provinces outside England. The Anglican
Anglican
Communion was founded at the Lambeth Conference
Lambeth Conference
in 1867 in London, England, under the leadership of Charles Longley, Archbishop
Archbishop
of Canterbury
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Western Christianity
Western Christianity
Christianity
is the type of Christianity
Christianity
which developed in the areas of the former Western Roman Empire.[1] Western Christianity consists of the Latin Rite
Latin Rite
of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
(in contrast to the Eastern rites in communion with Rome) and a wide variety of Protestant denominations. The name "Western Christianity" is applied in order to distinguish these from Eastern Christianity. With the expansion of European colonialism from the Early Modern era, Western Christianity
Christianity
spread throughout the Americas, much of the Philippines, Southern Africa, pockets of West Africa, and throughout Australia
Australia
and New Zealand
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Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Christian
A Christian
Christian
(/ˈkrɪstʃən, -tiən/ ( listen)) is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
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Old Catholic Church
The term Old Catholic
Old Catholic
Church was used from the 1850s, by groups which had separated from the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
over certain doctrines, primarily concerned with papal authority; some of these groups, especially in the Netherlands, had already existed long before the term. These churches are not in full communion with the Roman Catholic Church. Member churches of the Union of Utrecht
Utrecht
of the Old Catholic Churches (UU) are in full communion with the Anglican Communion,[1] and some are members of the World Council of Churches.[2] The formation of the Old Catholic
Old Catholic
communion of Germans, Austrians and Swiss began in 1870 at a public meeting held in Nuremberg
Nuremberg
under the leadership of Ignaz von Döllinger, following the First Vatican Council
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Diocese
The word diocese (/ˈdaɪəsɪs, -siːs, -siːz/)[a] is derived from the Greek term διοίκησις meaning "administration". When now used in an ecclesiastical sense, it refers to an administrative territorial entity.[2] In the Western Church, the district is under the supervision of a bishop (who may have assistant bishops to help him or her) and is divided into parishes under the care of priests; but in the Eastern Church, the word denotes the area under the jurisdiction of a patriarch and the bishops under his jurisdiction administer parishes.[2] This structure of church governance is known as episcopal polity. The word diocesan means relating or pertaining to a diocese. It can also be used as a noun meaning the bishop who has the principal supervision of a diocese
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Reformed Church
Calvinism
Calvinism
(also called the Reformed tradition, Reformed Christianity, Reformed Protestantism, or the Reformed faith) is a major branch of Protestantism
Protestantism
that follows the theological tradition and forms of Christian practice of John Calvin
John Calvin
and other Reformation-era theologians. Calvinists broke from the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in the 16th century. Calvinists differ from Lutherans on the real presence of Christ
Christ
in the Eucharist, theories of worship, and the use of God's law for believers, among other things.[1][2] As declared in the Westminster and Second Helvetic confessions, the core doctrines are predestination and election
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Episcopal Church (United States)
Episcopal may refer to:Bishop, an overseer in the Christian church Episcopate, the see of a bishop – a diocese Episcopal Church (other), any church with "Episcopal" in its nameThe Episcopal Church, an affiliate of Anglicanism
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Transfiguration Of Jesus
Portals: Christianity
Christianity
Bible  Book:Life of Jesusv t eThe Transfiguration of Jesus
Jesus
is an event reported in the New Testament when Jesus
Jesus
is transfigured and becomes radiant in glory upon a mountain.[1][2] The Synoptic Gospels
Synoptic Gospels
(Matthew 17:1–8, Mark 9:2–8, Luke 9:28–36) describe it, and the Second Epistle of Peter
Second Epistle of Peter
also refers to it (2 Peter 1:16–18). It has also been hypothesized that the first chapter of the Gospel of John
Gospel of John
alludes to it (John 1:14).[3] In these accounts, Jesus
Jesus
and three of his apostles, Peter, James, John, go to a mountain (the Mount of Transfiguration) to pray. On the mountain, Jesus
Jesus
begins to shine with bright rays of light
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Orthodox Church
The Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Church,[1] also known as the Orthodox Church,[2] or officially as the Orthodox Catholic Church,[3] is the second-largest Christian Church, with over 250 million members.[4][5] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and culture of Eastern Europe,
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Eastern Catholic Churches
The Eastern Catholic Churches
Eastern Catholic Churches
or Oriental Catholic Churches, also called the Eastern-rite Catholic Churches, and in some historical cases Uniate Churches,[a] are twenty-three Eastern Christian particular churches sui iuris in full communion with the Pope
Pope
in Rome, as part of the worldwide Catholic Church. Headed by patriarchs, metropolitans, and major archbishops, the Eastern Catholic Churches are governed in accordance with the Code of Canons of the Eastern Churches, although each church also has its own canons and laws on top of this, and the preservation of their own traditions is explicitly encouraged
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Collect
The collect (/ˈkɒlɛkt/ KOL-ekt) is a short general prayer of a particular structure used in Christian liturgy. Collects appear in the liturgies of Roman Catholic, Orthodox, Anglican, Methodist, and Lutheran
Lutheran
churches, among others (in those of eastern Christianity the Greek term [déesis] synapté is often used instead of the Latin
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