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New Deal
The New Deal
New Deal
was a series of federal programs, public work projects, financial reforms and regulations enacted in the United States
United States
during the 1930s in response to the Great Depression. Some of these federal programs included the Civilian Conservation Corps
Civilian Conservation Corps
(CCC), the Civil Works Administration (CWA), the Farm Security Administration
Farm Security Administration
(FSA), the National Industrial Recovery Act of 1933
National Industrial Recovery Act of 1933
(NIRA) and the Social Security Administration (SSA).[1][2][3][4][5] These programs included support for farmers, the unemployed, youth and the elderly as well as new constraints and safeguards on the banking industry and changes to the monetary system. Most programs were enacted between 1933–1938, though some were later
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Women's Suffrage
Women's suffrage
Women's suffrage
(colloquial: female suffrage, woman suffrage or women's right to vote) is the right of women to vote in elections; a person who advocates the extension of suffrage, particularly to women, is called a suffragist.[1] Limited voting rights were gained by women in Finland, Iceland, Sweden
Sweden
and some Australian colonies and western U.S. states in the late 19th century.[2] National and international organizations formed to coordinate efforts to gain voting rights, especially the International Woman
Woman
Suffrage
Suffrage
Alliance (founded in 1904, Berlin, Germany), and also worked for equal civil rights for women.[3] In 1881, the Isle of Man
Isle of Man
gave women who owned property the right to vote
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Social Progress
Social progress
Social progress
is the idea that societies can or do improve in terms of their social, political, and economic structures. This may happen as a result of direct human action, as in social enterprise or through activism, or as a natural part of sociocultural evolution. The concept of social progress was introduced in the early 19th century social theories, especially social evolution as described by Auguste Comte
Auguste Comte
and Herbert Spencer. It was present in the Enlightenment's philosophies of history
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Human Enhancement
Human enhancement
Human enhancement
(Augment) is "any attempt to temporarily or permanently overcome the current limitations of the human body through natural or artificial means. It is the use of technological means to select or alter human characteristics and capacities, whether or not the alteration results in characteristics and capacities that lie beyond the existing human range."[1][2][3]Contents1 Technologies1.1 Existing technologies 1.2 Emerging technologies 1.3 Speculative technologies2 Nootropics 3 Ethics3.1 Inequality and social disruption 3.2 Effects on identity 3.3 Human Enhancement Rhetoric (HER)4 Other issues 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksTechnologies[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
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Idea Of Progress
In intellectual history, the Idea of Progress is the idea that advances in technology, science, and social organization can produce an improvement in the human condition. That is, people can become better in terms of quality of life (social progress) through economic development (modernization), and the application of science and technology (scientific progress). The assumption is that the process will happen once people apply their reason and skills, for it is not divinely foreordained. The role of the expert is to identify hindrances that slow or neutralize progress. The Idea of Progress emerged primarily in the Enlightenment in the 18th century.[1][2] Significant movements in this period were Diderot's Encyclopedia, which carried on the campaign against authority and superstition, and the French Revolution
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Industrialisation
Industrialisation
Industrialisation
or industrialization is the period of social and economic change that transforms a human group from an agrarian society into an industrial society, involving the extensive re-organisation of an economy for the purpose of manufacturing.[2] As industrial workers' incomes rise, markets for consumer goods and services of all kinds tend to expand and provide a further stimulus to industrial investment and economic growth.Contents1 Background 2 Social consequences2.1 Urbanisation2.1.1 Exploitation2.2 Changes in family structure3 Cur
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Modernity
Modernity, a topic in the humanities and social sciences, is both a historical period (the modern era), as well as the ensemble of particular socio-cultural norms, attitudes and practices that arose in the wake of Renaissance, in the "Age of Reason" of 17th-century thought and the 18th-century "Enlightenment". While it includes a wide range of interrelated historical processes and cultural phenomena (from fashion to modern warfare), it can also refer to the subjective or existential experience of the conditions they produce, and their ongoing impact on human culture, institutions, and politics (Berman 2010, 15–36). Depending on the field, "modernity" may refer to different time periods or qualities
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Philosophical Progress
A prominent question in metaphilosophy is that of whether philosophical progress occurs, and more so, whether such progress in philosophy is even possible
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Progressive Education
Progressive education is a pedagogical movement that began in the late nineteenth century; it has persisted in various forms to the present. The term progressive was engaged to distinguish this education from the traditional Euro-American curricula of the 19th century, which was rooted in classical preparation for the university and strongly differentiated by social class. By contrast, progressive education finds its roots in present experience
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Progressive Rationalism
Progressive rationalism is the humanistic belief that improvements in global well-being depend on political change based on reason. It is progressive in the sense that could be falsified. It is a rationalist system of beliefs laden to empiricism, built, at least in first term, on certainties (reality is the one that once we stop to believe in it, doesn't disappear) not in mere beliefs. Progressive rationalists see corruption and faith as the two barriers to improved conditions. Politically it is opposed not only to right-wing systems of authoritarian or theocratic rule, but also to moral relativism exhibited by the left. It is distinct from both of its two stand-alone constituents by stating that both progressivism and rationalism are indispensable enablers for a flourishing society. Progressive rationalists generally see democratic governance as the best available political system and many additionally subscribe to libertarian paternalism
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Reform Movement
A reform movement is a type of social movement that aims to make gradual change, or change in certain aspects of society, rather than rapid or fundamental changes. A reform movement is distinguished from more radical social movements such as revolutionary movements. Reformists' ideas are often grounded in liberalism, although they may be rooted in socialist (specifically, social democratic) or religious concepts
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Social Organization
In sociology, a social organization is a pattern of relationships between and among individuals and social groups.[1][2] Characteristics of social organization can include qualities such as sexual composition, spatiotemporal cohesion, leadership, structure, division of labor, communication systems, and so on.[3][4] Because of these characteristics of social organization, people can monitor their everyday work and involvement in other activities that are controlled forms of human interaction. These interactions include: affiliation, collective resources, substitutability of individuals, and recorded control. These interactions come together to constitute common features in basic social units such as family, enterprises, clubs, or states. These are social organizations.[5]Contents1 Elements 2 Within society 3 Online 4 See also 5 ReferencesElements[edit] Social organizations happen in everyday life. Many people belong to various social structures—institutional and informal
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List Of Countries By Social Progress Index
The Social Progress Index (SPI) measures the extent to which countries provide for the social and environmental needs of their citizens. Fifty-four indicators in the areas of basic human needs, foundations of well-being, and opportunity to progress show the relative performance of nations. The index is published by the nonprofit Social Progress Imperative, and is based on the writings of Amartya Sen, Douglass North, and Joseph Stiglitz.[1] The SPI measures the well-being of a society by observing social and environmental outcomes directly rather than the economic factors
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Direct Democracy
Direct democracy
Direct democracy
or pure democracy is a form of democracy in which people decide on policy initiatives directly. This differs from the majority of most currently established democracies, which are representative democracies.Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Examples3.1 Ancient Athens 3.2 Switzerland 3.3 Paris Commune 3.4 United States 3.5 Rojava 3.6 Occupy Wall Street4 Democratic reform trilemma 5 Electronic direct democracy 6 Relation to other movements 7 In schools 8 Contemporary movements 9 See also 10 Notes and references 11 Bibliography 12 Further reading 13 External links13.1 MultimediaOverview[edit] In a representative democracy, people vote for representatives who then enact policy initiatives.[1] In direct democracy, people decide on policies without any intermediary
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Scientific Progress
Scientific progress is the idea that science increases its problem-solving ability through the application of the scientific method.Contents1 Discontinuous model of scientific progress 2 History of science
History of science
as a model of scientific progress 3 Origins of the concept 4 Quotes on scientific progress 5 See also 6 Notes and references 7 Bibliography 8 External linksDiscontinuous model of scientific progress[edit] Several philosophers of science have supported arguments that the progress of science is discontinuous. In that case, progress isn't a continuous accumulation, but rather a revolutionary process where brand new ideas are adopted and old ideas become abandoned. Thomas Kuhn was a major proponent of this model of scientific progress, as explained in his book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. This is especially supported by studying the incommensurability of theories
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Social Change
Social change
Social change
is an alteration in the social order of a society. Social change
Social change
may include changes in nature, social institutions, social behaviours, or social relations.Contents1 Definition 2 Prominent theories 3 Current social changes3.1 Global demographic shifts 3.2 Gendered patterns of work and care4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksDefinition[edit] Social change
Social change
may refer to the notion of social progress or sociocultural evolution, the philosophical idea that society moves forward by dialectical or evolutionary means. It may refer to a paradigmatic change in the socio-economic structure, for instance a shift away from feudalism and towards capitalism. Accordingly, it may also refer to social revolution, such as the Socialist revolution presented in Marxism, or to other social movements, such as Women's suffrage or the Civil rights movement
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