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New Covenant
The New Covenant
New Covenant
(Hebrew ברית חדשה‬  berit hadashah (help·info); Greek διαθήκη καινή diatheke kaine) is a biblical interpretation originally derived from a phrase in the Book of Jeremiah, in the Hebrew Bible. It is often thought of as an eschatological (ultimate destiny of Humanity) Messianic Age
Messianic Age
or world to come and is related to the biblical concept of the Kingdom of God. Generally, Christians believe that the promised New Covenant
New Covenant
was instituted at the Last Supper
Last Supper
as part of the Eucharist,[1] which in the Gospel of John
Gospel of John
includes the New Commandment. Based on the Bible teaching that, "For where a testament is, there must also of necessity be the death of the testator
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Saint Peter
Saint
Saint
Peter (Syriac/Aramaic: ܫܸܡܥܘܿܢ ܟܹ݁ܐܦ݂ܵܐ, Shemayon Keppa, Hebrew: שמעון בר יונה‎ Shim'on bar Yona, Greek: Πέτρος Petros, Coptic: ⲡⲉⲧⲣⲟⲥ, translit. Petros, Latin: Petrus; r. AD 30;[1] d. between AD 64 and 68[2]), also known as Simon Peter, Simeon, or Simon ( pronunciation (help·info)), according to the New Testament, was one of the Twelve Apostles
Twelve Apostles
of Jesus
Jesus
Christ, leaders of the early Christian Great Church. Pope
Pope
Gregory I called him repeatedly the "Prince of the Apostles".[3] According to Catholic teaching, Jesus promised Peter in the "Rock of My Church" dialogue in Matthew 16:18 a special position in the Church
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Ministry Of Jesus
In the Christian gospels, the ministry of Jesus
Jesus
begins with his baptism in the countryside of Roman Judea
Roman Judea
and Transjordan, near the river Jordan, and ends in Jerusalem, following the
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Martin Luther
Martin Luther, O.S.A. (/ˈluːθər/;[1] German: [ˈmaɐ̯tiːn ˈlʊtɐ] ( listen); 10 November 1483[2] – 18 February 1546) was a German professor of theology, composer, priest, monk,[3] and a seminal figure in the Protestant Reformation. Luther came to reject several teachings and practices of the Roman Catholic Church. He strongly disputed the Catholic view on indulgences. Luther proposed an academic discussion of the practice and efficacy of indulgences in his Ninety-five Theses
Ninety-five Theses
of 1517
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Liturgical Year
The liturgical year, also known as the church year or Christian year, as well as the kalendar,[1] consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in Christian churches that determines when feast days, including celebrations of saints, are to be observed, and which portions of Scripture
Scripture
are to be read either in an annual cycle or in a cycle of several years. Distinct liturgical colours may appear in connection with different seasons of the liturgical year
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Christian Art
Christian art
Christian art
is sacred art which uses themes and imagery from Christianity. Most Christian groups use or have used art to some extent, although some have had strong objections to some forms of religious image, and there have been major periods of iconoclasm within Christianity. Images of Jesus
Jesus
and narrative scenes from the Life of Christ are the most common subjects, and scenes from the Old Testament
Old Testament
play a part in the art of most denominations. Images of the Virgin Mary and saints are much rarer in Protestant art than that of Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy. Christianity
Christianity
makes far wider use of images than related religions, in which figurative representations are forbidden, such as Islam and Judaism
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Crusades
After 1291Smyrniote 1343–1351 Alexandrian 1365 Savoyard 1366 Barbary 1390 Nicopolis 1396 Varna
Varna
1443 Portuguese 1481 Northern Crusades
Northern Crusades
(1147–1410)Wendish 1147 Swedish<
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Constantine The Great
Constantine the Great
Constantine the Great
(Latin: Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus Augustus;[2] Greek: Κωνσταντῖνος ὁ Μέγας; 27 February c. 272 AD[1] – 22 May 337 AD), also known as Constantine I or Saint Constantine, in the Orthodox Church
Orthodox Church
as Saint Constantine the Great, Equal-to-the-Apostles,[3] was a Roman Emperor of Illyrian and Greek origin from 306 to 337 AD. He was the son of Flavius Valerius Constantius, a Roman Army
Roman Army
officer, and his consort Helena. His father became Caesar, the deputy emperor in the west, in 293 AD. Constantine was sent east, where he rose through the ranks to become a military tribune under Emperors Diocletian
Diocletian
and Galerius
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Creed
A creed (also known as a confession, symbol, or statement of faith) is a statement of the shared beliefs of a religious community in the form of a fixed formula summarizing core tenets. One of the most widely used creeds in Christianity
Christianity
is the Nicene Creed, first formulated in AD 325 at the First Council of Nicaea. It was based on Christian understanding of the Canonical Gospels, the letters of the New Testament
New Testament
and to a lesser extent the Old Testament. Affirmation of this creed, which describes the Trinity, is generally taken as a fundamental test of orthodoxy for most Christian denominations.[1] The Apostles' Creed
Apostles' Creed
is also broadly accepted
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Augustine Of Hippo
Augustine of Hippo
Augustine of Hippo
(/ɔːˈɡʌstɪn/; 13 November 354 – 28 August 430)[1] was an early Christian theologian
Christian theologian
and philosopher from Numidia whose writings influenced the development of Western Christianity
Western Christianity
and Western philosophy. He was the bishop of Hippo Regius
Hippo Regius
in north Africa and is viewed as one of the most important Church Fathers
Church Fathers
in Western Christianity
Christianity
for his writings in the Patristic Era. Among his most important works are The City of God, On Christian Doctrine
On Christian Doctrine
and Confessions. According to his contemporary Jerome, Augustine "established anew the ancient Faith".[note 1] In his youth he was drawn to Manichaeism, later to neo-Platonism
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Radical Reformation
The Radical Reformation
Reformation
was the response to what was believed to be the corruption in both the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and the expanding Magisterial Protestant movement led by Martin Luther
Martin Luther
and many others. Beginning in Germany and Switzerland in the 16th century, the Radical Reformation
Reformation
gave birth to many radical Protestant groups throughout Europe
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Jesus
Jesus[e] (c. 4 BC – c. AD 30 / 33), also referred to as Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth
Nazareth
and Jesus
Jesus
Christ,[f] was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.[12] He is the central figure of Christianity
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East–West Schism
The East–West Schism, also called the Great Schism
Schism
and the Schism
Schism
of 1054, was the break of communion between what are now the Roman
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Church Fathers
The Church Fathers, Early Church
Early Church
Fathers, Christian Fathers, or Fathers of the Church are ancient and generally influential Christian theologians, some of whom were eminent teachers and great bishops. The term is used of writers or teachers of the Church not necessarily ordained[1] and not necessarily "saints"— Origen
Origen
Adamantius and Tertullian
Tertullian
are often considered Church Fathers, but are not saints, owing to their views later being deemed heretical.[2] Most Church Fathers are honored as saints in the Catholic
Catholic
Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, Oriental Orthodoxy, the Church of the East, Anglicanism
Anglicanism
and Lutheranism, as well as other churches and groups
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History Of Christianity
The history of Christianity
Christianity
concerns the Christian religion, Christendom, and the Church with its various denominations, from the 1st century to the present. Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
and Eastern Orthodox Christianity
Christianity
spread to all of Europe in the Middle Ages. Christianity
Christianity
expanded throughout the world and became the world's largest religion due to European colonialism.[1] Today there are more than two billion Christians worldwide.[2]Contents1 Early Christianity
Christianity
(c
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Christian Tradition
Christian tradition is a collection of traditions consisting of practices or beliefs associated with Christianity. These ecclesiastical traditions have more or less authority based on the nature of the practices or beliefs and on the group in question. Many churches have traditional practices, such as particular patterns of worship or rites, that developed over time. Deviations from such patterns are sometimes considered unacceptable or heretical. Similarly, traditions can be stories or history that are or were widely accepted without being part of Christian doctrine, e.g., the crucifixion of Saint Peter
Saint Peter
or the evangelistic activity of Thomas the Apostle in India, which are widely believed to have happened but are not recorded in scripture
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