HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Lloyd's Of London
Lloyd's of London, generally known simply as Lloyd's, is an insurance market located in London, United Kingdom. Unlike most of its competitors in the industry, it is not an insurance company. Rather, Lloyd's is a corporate body governed by the Lloyd's Act 1871 and subsequent Acts of Parliament and operates as a partially-mutualised marketplace within which multiple financial backers, grouped in syndicates, come together to pool and spread risk. These underwriters, or "members", are a collection of both corporations and private individuals, the latter being traditionally known as "Names". The business underwritten at Lloyd's is predominantly general insurance and reinsurance, although a small number of syndicates write term life assurance. The market has its roots in marine insurance and was founded by Edward Lloyd at his coffee house on Tower Street in around 1686
[...More...]

"Lloyd's Of London" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mesothelioma
Mesothelioma
Mesothelioma
is a type of cancer that develops from the thin layer of tissue that covers many of the internal organs (known as the mesothelium).[9] The most common area affected is the lining of the lungs and chest wall.[1][3] Less commonly the lining of the abdomen and rarely the sac surrounding the heart,[10] or the sac surrounding the testis may be affected.[1][11] Signs and symptoms of mesothelioma may include shortness of breath due to fluid around the lung, a swollen abdomen, chest wall pain, cough, feeling tired, and weight loss.[1] These symptoms typically come on slowly.[2] More than 80% of mesothelioma cases are caused by exposu
[...More...]

"Mesothelioma" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Chief Executive Officer
Chief executive officer (CEO)[1] is the position of the most senior corporate officer, executive, leader or administrator in charge of managing an organization – especially an independent legal entity such as a company or nonprofit institution. CEOs lead a range of organizations, including public and private corporations, non-profit organizations and even some government organizations (e.g., Crown corporations). The CEO of a corporation or company typically reports to the board of directors and is charged with maximizing the value of the entity,[1] which may include maximizing the share price, market share, revenues, or another element. In the non-profit and government sector, CEOs typically aim at achieving outcomes related to the organization's mission, such as reducing poverty, increasing literacy, etc
[...More...]

"Chief Executive Officer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Property Insurance
Property
Property
insurance provides protection against most risks to property, such as fire, theft and some weather damage. This includes specialized forms of insurance such as fire insurance, flood insurance, earthquake insurance, home insurance, or boiler insurance. Property
Property
is insured in two main ways—open perils and named perils. Open perils cover all the causes of loss not specifically excluded in the policy. Common exclusions on open peril policies include damage resulting from earthquakes, floods, nuclear incidents, acts of terrorism, and war. Named perils require the actual cause of loss to be listed in the policy for insurance to be provided
[...More...]

"Property Insurance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
[...More...]

"Latin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cornhill, London
Cornhill is a ward and street in the City of London, the historic nucleus and financial centre of modern London. The street runs between Bank junction
Bank junction
and Leadenhall Street. The hill from which it takes its name is one of the three ancient hills of London; the others are Tower Hill, site of the Tower of London, and Ludgate Hill, crowned by St Paul's Cathedral. The highest point of Cornhill is at 17.7 metres (58 ft) above sea level.[1]Contents1 History 2 Contemporary Cornhill2.1 Role in City elections3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Cornhill is one of the traditional divisions of the City. The street contains two of the City churches designed by Sir Christopher Wren: St. Michael, Cornhill, and St Peter upon Cornhill, reputed to occupy the oldest Christianised site in London. Both are on the site of the Roman forum of Londinium. At its other end it meets Threadneedle Street, Poultry, Lombard Street and others at Bank junction
[...More...]

"Cornhill, London" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

San Francisco
 CaliforniaCSA San Jose–San Francisco–OaklandMetro San Francisco–Oakland–HaywardMission June 29, 1776[1]Incorporated April 15, 1850[2]Founded by José Joaquín Moraga Francisco PalóuNamed for St
[...More...]

"San Francisco" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Market Capitalization
Market capitalization
Market capitalization
(market cap) is the market value at a point in time of the shares outstanding of a publicly traded company, being equal to the share price at that point of time multiplied by the number of shares outstanding.[2][3] As outstanding stock is bought and sold in public markets, capitalization could be used as an indicator of public opinion of a company's net worth and is a determining factor in some forms of stock valuation. Market capitalization
Market capitalization
is used by the investment community in ranking the size of companies, as opposed to sales or total asset figures. It is also used in ranking the relative size of stock exchanges, being a measure of the sum of the market capitalizations of all companies listed on each stock exchange
[...More...]

"Market Capitalization" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Life Insurance
Life insurance
Life insurance
(or life assurance, especially in the Commonwealth of Nations) is a contract between an insurance policy holder and an insurer or assurer, where the insurer promises to pay a designated beneficiary a sum of money (the benefit) in exchange for a premium, upon the death of an insured person (often the policy holder). Depending on the contract, other events such as terminal illness or critical illness can also trigger payment. The policy holder typically pays a premium, either regularly or as one lump sum. Other expenses, such as funeral expenses, can also be included in the benefits. Life policies are legal contracts and the terms of the contract describe the limitations of the insured events
[...More...]

"Life Insurance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Corporation
A corporation is a company or group of people authorized to act as a single entity (legally a person) and recognized as such in law. Early incorporated entities were established by charter (i.e. by an ad hoc act granted by a monarch or passed by a parliament or legislature). Most jurisdictions now allow the creation of new corporations through registration
[...More...]

"Corporation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Conflict Of Interest
A conflict of interest (COI) is a situation in which a person or organization is involved in multiple interests, financial or otherwise, in situations where serving one the interests could involve working against one of the other interests. Typically, this relates to situations when the personal interest of an individual or organization might adversely affect a duty owed to make decisions for the benefit of a third-party. The presence of a conflict of interest is independent of the occurrence of impropriety. Therefore, a conflict of interest can be discovered and voluntarily defused before any corruption occurs
[...More...]

"Conflict Of Interest" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Risk
Risk
Risk
is the potential of gaining or losing something of value. Values (such as physical health, social status, emotional well-being, or financial wealth) can be gained or lost when taking risk resulting from a given action or inaction, foreseen or unforeseen (planned or not planned). Risk
Risk
can also be defined as the intentional interaction with uncertainty.[1] Uncertainty
Uncertainty
is a potential, unpredictable, and uncontrollable outcome; risk is a consequence of action taken in spite of uncertainty.[2] Risk perception is the subjective judgment people make about the severity and probability of a risk, and may vary person to person
[...More...]

"Risk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Capital Gain
A capital gain refers to profit that results from a sale of a capital asset, such as stock, bond or real estate, where the sale price exceeds the purchase price
[...More...]

"Capital Gain" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Acts Of Parliament In The United Kingdom
In the United Kingdom, Acts of Parliament are primary legislation passed by the Parliament of the United Kingdom.[1][2] Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, as a result of the Glorious Revolution and the assertion of parliamentary sovereignty, are supreme law that cannot be overturned by any body other than Parliament. As a result of devolution, the National Assembly for Wales, the Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
Assembly, and the Scottish Parliament
Scottish Parliament
are able to create primary legislation for their respective devolved institutions. These devolved legislatures are able to create legislation regarding all but reserved and excepted matters. However, Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
remain supreme and can overrule the devolved legislatures
[...More...]

"Acts Of Parliament In The United Kingdom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Capital Gains Tax
A capital gains tax (CGT) is a tax on capital gains, the profit realized on the sale of a non-inventory asset that was greater than the amount realized on the sale. The most common capital gains are realized from the sale of stocks, bonds, precious metals and property. Not all countries implement a capital gains tax and most have different rates of taxation for individuals and corporations. For equities, an example of a popular and liquid asset, national and state legislation often has a large array of fiscal obligations that must be respected regarding capital gains. Taxes are charged by the state over the transactions, dividends and capital gains on the stock market
[...More...]

"Capital Gains Tax" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Blue Plaque
A blue plaque is a permanent sign installed in a public place in the United Kingdom and elsewhere to commemorate a link between that location and a famous person, event, or former building on the site, serving as a historical marker. The term is used in the United Kingdom in two different senses. It may be used narrowly and specifically to refer to the "official" scheme administered by English Heritage, and currently restricted to sites within Greater London; or it may be used less formally to encompass similar schemes elsewhere. The "official" scheme traces its origins to that launched in 1866 in London, on the initiative of the politician William Ewart, to mark the homes and workplaces of famous people.[1][2] It has been administered successively by the Society of Arts (1866–1901), the London County Council (1901–1965), the Greater London
Greater London
Council (1965–1986) and English Heritage
English Heritage
(1986 to date)
[...More...]

"Blue Plaque" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.