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List Of London Assembly Constituencies
An electoral district, (election) precinct, election district, or legislative district, called a voting district by the US Census[1] (also known as a constituency, riding, ward, division, electoral area, or electorate) is a territorial subdivision for electing members to a legislative body. Generally, only voters (constituents) who reside within the district are permitted to vote in an election held there. From a single district, a single member or multiple members might be chosen
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Constituency (other)
Constituent or constituency may refer to:Contents1 In politics 2 In the physical sciences 3 Other meanings 4 See alsoIn politics[edit] Electoral district
Electoral district
or constituency Constituent (politics), an individual voter within an electoral district (constituency) Interest group
Interest group
or constituency Constituent assembly Entity forming part of a sovereign state: Constituent state Constituent countryConstituency (administrative division), in Namibia and the Canton of St
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Vote Counting
There exist various methods through which the ballots cast at an election may be counted, prior to applying a voting system to obtain one or more winners.Contents1 Manual counting 2 Electromechanical and Optical scan counting 3 Direct-recording voting (mechanical) counting 4 Direct-recording electronic counting 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksManual counting[edit] Manual counting requires a physical ballot that represents voter intent. The physical ballots are read and interpreted; then results are individually tabulated.[1] This method is used in Sweden for example, and conducted as follows. The voter casts three ballots, one for each of the three elections (national, regional, and local), each in a sealed envelope. The party and candidate names are pre-printed on the ballot, or the voter can write them in on a blank ballot. When voting has finished, all envelopes are opened on the counting table, for one election at a time
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Refused Ballot
A refused ballot, or similar alternative, is a choice available to voters in many elections. This is an alternative for many people to casting a disparaging spoiled ballot, which is not counted separately from ballots which have been accidentally spoiled.Contents1 Canada 2 Russia 3 See also 4 External links 5 ReferencesCanada[edit] Some provinces allow a ballot to be refused on the grounds that no party satisfies the elector's vote.[1][2] Declined ballots are only legislated in the provinces of Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta; the option is only available for provincial elections.[3] During the 2000 Canadian federal election, a number of voters (chiefly in Edmonton, Alberta) ate their ballots, as part of what they dubbed the Edible Ballot
Ballot
Society, to protest what they saw as inherently unfair elections
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Secret Ballot
The secret ballot is a voting method in which a voter's choices in an election or a referendum is anonymous, forestalling attempts to influence the voter by intimidation, blackmailing, and potential vote buying. The system is one means of achieving the goal of political privacy. Secret ballots are used in conjunction with various voting systems. The most basic form of secret ballot utilizes blank pieces of paper, upon which each voter writes his or her choice. Without revealing the votes to anyone, the voter would fold the ballot paper and place it in a sealed box, which is emptied later for counting. An aspect of secret voting is the provision of a voting booth to enable the voter to write on the ballot paper without others being able to see what is being written
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Spoilt Vote
In voting, a ballot is considered spoilt, spoiled, void, null, informal, invalid, or stray if a law declares or an election authority determines that it is invalid and thus not included in the vote count. This may occur accidentally or deliberately
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Slate (elections)
A slate is a group of candidates that run in multi-seat or multi-position elections on a common platform. The common platform may be because the candidates are all members of a political party, have the same or similar policies, or some other reason.Contents1 Elections that commonly have slates1.1 United States electoral college 1.2 United States legislative elections 1.3 United Kingdom student unions 1.4 Canadian municipal elections 1.5 Canadian student unions 1.6 Philippine elections 1.7 Russian elections 1.8 Israeli Knesset
Knesset
elections2 ReferencesElections that commonly have slates[edit] United States electoral college[edit] The United States presidential elections use an electoral college to determine the winner and the electors are chosen by popular vote in each state
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Split-ticket Voting
Split-ticket voting refers to when a voter in an election votes for candidates from different political parties when multiple offices are being decided by a single election, as opposed to straight-ticket voting, where a voter chooses candidates from the same political party for every office up for election.Contents1 Australia 2 United Kingdom 3 United States 4 Motivations 5 Split ticket preferences 6 ReferencesAustralia[edit] In Australia, federal elections in recent times have usually involved a House of Representatives election and a half-Senate election occurring on the same day.[1] Most states, with the exception of Queensland
Queensland
and Tasmania,[2] also hold elections for both houses of parliament simultaneously
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Straight-ticket Voting
Straight-ticket voting
Straight-ticket voting
or straight-party voting is the practice of voting for every candidate that a political party has on a general election ballot. In general, straight-ticket voting was a very common occurrence up until around the 1960s and 1970s. Since that time, straight-ticket voting has declined in the United States among the general voting population; however, strong partisans (that is strong party identifiers) have remained straight-ticket voters.[1] In the early days of the parties, it was nearly impossible not to vote on a straight-party line vote. Voters would receive a colored ballot with that party's nominees on it. A split-ticket vote would require two different colored ballots, which confused the voter. Often, the voter would choose a specific party, and vote for everyone from that party
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Tactical Voting
In voting methods, tactical voting (or strategic voting or sophisticated voting or insincere voting) occurs, in elections with more than two candidates, when a voter supports another candidate more strongly than their sincere preference in order to prevent an undesirable outcome.[1] For example, in a simple plurality election, a voter might sometimes gain a "better" outcome by voting for a less preferred but more generally popular candidate. It has been shown by the Gibbard–Satterthwaite theorem that any single-winner ranked voting method which is not dictatorial must be susceptible to tactical voting
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Tally (voting)
A tally (also see tally sticks) is an unofficial private observation of an election count carried out under Proportional Representation using the Single Transferable Vote. Tallymen, appointed by political candidates and parties, observe the opening of ballot boxes and watch as the individual ballot papers are counted. Individual tallymen may be placed to observe the opening of each box and watch as separate bundles of ballot papers are sorted, stacked and counted. They record their estimation of counts by marking votes for each candidate on their 'tally sheet' as a tick (/) which are then assembled together to produce a full prediction of what the likely outcome of the result will be
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Ticket (election)
A ticket refers to a single election choice which fills more than one political office or seat. For example, in the U.S., the candidates for President and Vice President run on the same "ticket", because they are elected together on a single ballot question rather than separately. A ticket can also refer to a political party. In this case, the candidates for a given party are said to be running on the party's ticket. "Straight party voting" (most common in some U.S. states) is voting for the entire party ticket, including every office for which the party has a candidate running
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Vote Center
In the United States of America, a vote center, sometimes known as a super precinct, is a polling place that combines multiple precincts allowing voters to choose at which location to vote. Voter centers can be used to allow voters to choose from any polling place within a larger jurisdiction, commonly county. Vote centers were first used in Larimer County, Colorado, USA.[1] Vote centers can reduce the number of precincts required per election theoretically reducing costs. References[edit]^ A Study of Vote Centers and their Applicability to the Hoosier Election
Election
ProcessThis election-related article is a stub
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Vote Pairing
Vote pairing occurs when two people commit to voting in a mutually agreed upon manner. Vote swapping is a common example of vote pairing, where a voter in one district agrees to vote tactically for a less-preferred candidate or party who has a greater chance of winning in their district, in exchange for a voter from another district voting tactically for the candidate the first voter prefers, because that candidate has a greater possibility of winning in that district. Vote pairing occurs informally (i.e., without binding contracts) but sometimes with great sophistication in the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada. In the UK and Australia, pairing is the mechanism by which two members of parliament of opposing parties agree, with the consent of their party whips, to abstain from voting if the other one is unable to vote. Thus maintaining the balance, of votes if one or the other is unable to attend
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Protest Vote
A protest vote (also known as a blank vote or white vote) is a vote cast in an election to demonstrate the voter's dissatisfaction with the choice of candidates or refusal of the current political system. In this latter case, protest vote may take the form of a valid vote, but instead of voting for the mainstream candidates, it is a vote in favor of a minority or fringe candidate, either from the far-left, far-right or self-presenting as a candidate foreign to the political system. Along with abstention, which is simply the act of not voting, it is often considered to be a clear sign of the lack of popular legitimacy and roots of representative democracy, as depressed voter turnout endangers the credibility of the whole voting system. If protest vote takes the form of a blank vote, it may or may not be tallied into final results depending on the rules
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Voter Apathy
In politics, voter apathy is perceived apathy (lack of caring) among voters in an election.[1][2][3][4] Voter apathy or lack of interest is often cited as a cause of low turnout among eligible voters[5][6][7][8] in jurisdictions where voting is optional and the donkey vote where voting is compulsory. Voter fatigue describes a possible cause of voter apathy: elections that are held too frequently. Political alienation may be confused with voter apathy
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