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Leading Wheel
The LEADING WHEEL or LEADING AXLE or PILOT WHEEL of a steam locomotive is an unpowered wheel or axle located in front of the driving wheels. The axle or axles of the leading wheels are normally located on a leading truck . Leading wheels are used to help the locomotive negotiate curves and to support the front portion of the boiler. Importantly, the leading bogie does not have simple rotational motion about a vertical pivot, as might first be thought. It must also be free to slip sideways to a small extent (otherwise the locomotive is unable to follow curves accurately – a point lost on the 19th century railway pioneers), and some kind of springing mechanism is normally included to control this movement and give a tendency to return to centre. The sliding bogie of this type was patented by William Adams in 1865. The first use of leading wheels is commonly attributed to John B. Jervis
John B

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London, Brighton And South Coast Railway
The LONDON, BRIGHTON AND SOUTH COAST RAILWAY (LB known also as "the Brighton
Brighton
line", "the Brighton
Brighton
Railway" or the Brighton) was a railway company in the United Kingdom from 1846 to 1922. Its territory formed a rough triangle, with London at its apex, practically the whole coastline of Sussex
Sussex
as its base, and a large part of Surrey
Surrey
. It was bounded on its western side by the London and South Western Railway (L&SWR), which provided an alternative route to Portsmouth
Portsmouth
. On its eastern side the LB&SCR was bounded by the South Eastern Railway (SER) – later one component of the South Eastern and Chatham Railway (SE&CR) – which provided an alternative route to Bexhill , St Leonards-on-Sea , and Hastings
Hastings

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Duplex Locomotive
A DUPLEX LOCOMOTIVE is a steam locomotive that divides the driving force on its wheels by using two pairs of cylinders rigidly mounted to a single locomotive frame ; it is not an articulated locomotive . The concept was first used in France in 1863, but was particularly developed in the early 1930s by the Baldwin Locomotive Works
Baldwin Locomotive Works
, the largest commercial builder of steam locomotives in North America
North America
, under the supervision of its then chief engineer, Ralph P. Johnson . Prior to this, the term duplex locomotive was sometimes applied to articulated locomotives in general. CONTENTS * 1 Drawbacks of the 2-cylinder locomotive * 2 The duplex solution * 3 Baltimore and Ohio class N-1 #5600 George H
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Crampton Locomotive
A CRAMPTON LOCOMOTIVE is a type of steam locomotive designed by Thomas Russell Crampton and built by various firms from 1846 . The main British builders were Tulk and Ley and Robert Stephenson and Company . Notable features were a low boiler and large driving wheels . The crux of the Crampton patent was that the single driving axle was placed behind the firebox, so that the driving wheels could be very large. This helped to give this design a low centre of gravity, so that it did not require a very broad-gauge track to travel safely at high speeds. Its wheel arrangement was usually 4-2-0 or 6-2-0
6-2-0

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Railway Inspectorate
Established in 1840, HM RAILWAY INSPECTORATE (HMRI: Her Majesty 's Railway
Railway
Inspectorate) is the British organisation responsible for overseeing safety on Britain's railways and tramways . Previously a separate non-departmental public body it was, from 1990 to April 2006, part of the Health and Safety
Safety
Executive , then was transferred to the Office of Rail and Road and finally ceased to exist in May 2009 when it was renamed the Safety
Safety
Directorate. However, in the Summer of 2015 its name has been re-established as the safety arm of ORR. August 2015 being the 175th anniversary of its founding
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LB&SCR B1 Class
The London, Brighton and South Coast Railway
London, Brighton and South Coast Railway
B1 CLASS is a class of 0-4-2
0-4-2
express passenger steam locomotives , known from the name of the first, No. 214, as the "Gladstones". CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Southern Railway * 3 Accidents and incidents * 4 Preservation * 5 References * 6 External links HISTORYThey were the last express passenger design of William Stroudley , and were a larger and improved version of his Richmond class of 1878. Thirty-six locomotives were turned out from Brighton railway works between 1882 and 1891, and were used for the heaviest London to Brighton express trains. All were named after politicians, men associated with the railway, or places served by the railway. In 1889 No.189 Edward Blount was exhibited at the 1889 Paris Exhibition and received a gold medal
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Great Western Railway
The GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY (GWR) was a British railway company that linked London with the south-west and west of England, the Midlands , and most of Wales . It was founded in 1833, received its enabling Act of Parliament on 31 August 1835 and ran its first trains in 1838. It was engineered by Isambard Kingdom Brunel , who chose a broad gauge of 7 ft (2,134 mm)—later slightly widened to 7 ft 1⁄4 in (2,140 mm)—but, from 1854, a series of amalgamations saw it also operate 4 ft 8 1⁄2 in (1,435 mm) standard-gauge trains; the last broad-gauge services were operated in 1892. The GWR was the only company to keep its identity through the Railways Act 1921 , which amalgamated it with the remaining independent railways within its territory, and it was finally merged at the end of 1947 when it was nationalised and became the Western Region of British Railways
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Doublebois Railway Station
There are seventeen DISUSED RAILWAY STATIONS ON THE CORNISH MAIN LINE between Plymouth
Plymouth
in Devon
Devon
and Penzance
Penzance
in Cornwall
Cornwall
, England. The remains of nine of these can be seen from passing trains. While a number of these were closed following the so-called " Beeching Axe
Beeching Axe
" in the 1960s, many of them had been closed much earlier, the traffic for which they had been built failing to materialise
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Wheel Arrangement
In rail transport , a WHEEL ARRANGEMENT or WHEEL CONFIGURATION is a system of classifying the way in which wheels are distributed under a locomotive . Several notations exist to describe the wheel assemblies of a locomotive by type, position, and connections, with the adopted notations varying by country. Within a given country, different notations may also be employed for different kinds of locomotives, such as steam , electric , and diesel powered. Especially in steam days, wheel arrangement was an important attribute of a locomotive because there were many different types of layout adopted, each wheel being optimised for a different use (often with only some being actually "driven"). Modern diesel and electric locomotives are much more uniform, usually with all axles driven
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PRR S2
The Pennsylvania Railroad
Pennsylvania Railroad
's class S2 was a steam turbine locomotive . One was built, #6200, delivered in 1944. The S2 was the sole example of the 6-8-6 wheel arrangement in the Whyte notation
Whyte notation
, with a six-wheel leading truck , eight driving wheels , and a six-wheel trailing truck . The S2 used a direct-drive steam turbine ; the turbine was geared to the center pair of axles with the outer two axles connected by side rods . The disadvantage was that the turbine could not operate at optimal speeds over the locomotive's entire speed range. The S2 was the largest direct-drive turbine locomotive design ever built. The locomotive was to be a 4-8-4 , but wartime restrictions on light steel alloys increased weight until six-wheel leading and trailing trucks were needed
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Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
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L. T. C. Rolt
LIONEL THOMAS CASWALL ROLT (usually abbreviated to TOM ROLT or L. T. C. ROLT) (11 February 1910 – 9 May 1974 ) was a prolific English writer and the biographer of major civil engineering figures including Isambard Kingdom Brunel
Isambard Kingdom Brunel
and Thomas Telford
Thomas Telford
. He is also regarded as one of the pioneers of the leisure cruising industry on Britain's inland waterways, and as an enthusiast for both vintage cars and heritage railways . CONTENTS * 1 Biography * 2 Achievements and honours * 3 Bibliography * 3.1 Waterways * 3.2 Railways * 3.3 Biography * 3.4 Industrial history * 3.5 Autobiography * 3.6 Other * 4 Gallery * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 External links BIOGRAPHYTom Rolt was born in Chester
Chester
to a line of Rolts "dedicated to hunting and procreation"
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The Bodley Head
THE BODLEY HEAD is an English publishing house, founded in 1887 and existing as an independent entity until the 1970s. The name was used as an imprint of Random House Children's Books from 1987 to 2008. In April 2008, it was revived as an adult non-fiction imprint within Random House's CCV division. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Relaunch * 3 See also * 4 Bibliography * 5 References * 6 External links HISTORYOriginally JOHN LANE AND ELKIN MATHEWS — THE BODLEY HEAD was a partnership set up in 1887 by John Lane (1854–1925) and Elkin Mathews (1851–1921), to trade in antiquarian books in London. It took its name from a bust of Sir Thomas Bodley , the eponymist of the Bodleian Library in Oxford, above the shop door. Lane and Matthews began in 1894 to publish works of ‘stylish decadence’, including the notorious literary periodical The Yellow Book
Book

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International Standard Book Number
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier. An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book , a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 based upon the 9-digit STANDARD BOOK NUMBERING (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero)
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William Adams (locomotive Engineer)
WILLIAM ADAMS (15 October 1823 – 7 August 1904) was the Locomotive Superintendent of the North London Railway
North London Railway
from 1858 to 1873; the Great Eastern Railway
Great Eastern Railway
from 1873 until 1878 and the London and South Western Railway from then until his retirement in 1895. He is best known for his locomotives featuring the Adams bogie , a device with lateral centring springs (initially made of rubber) to improve high-speed stability. He should not be mistaken for William Bridges Adams (1797–1872) a locomotive engineer who, confusingly, invented the Adams axle
Adams axle
– a radial axle that William Adams incorporated in designs for the London and South Western Railway
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Aar Wheel Arrangement
The AAR WHEEL ARRANGEMENT system is a method of classifying locomotive (or unit) wheel arrangements that was developed by the Association of American Railroads . It is essentially a simplification of the European UIC classification , and it is widely used in North America to describe diesel and electric locomotives . It is not used for steam locomotives which use the Whyte notation instead. The AAR system counts axles instead of wheels. Letters refer to powered axles, and numbers to unpowered (or idler) axles. "A" refers to one powered axle, "B" to two powered axles in a row, "C" to three powered axles in a row, and "D" to four powered axles in a row. "1" refers to one idler axle, and "2" to two idler axles in a row. A dash ("–") separates trucks , or wheel assemblies. A plus sign ("+") refers to articulation
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