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Knesset
Government (66)[1]     Likud
Likud
(30)      Kulanu
Kulanu
(10)      The Jewish
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Synagogue
A synagogue, also spelled synagog (pronounced /ˈsɪnəɡɒɡ/; from Greek συναγωγή, synagogē, 'assembly', Hebrew: בית כנסת‬ bet kenesset, 'house of assembly' or בית תפילה‬ bet tefila, "house of prayer", Yiddish: שול shul, Ladino: אסנוגה esnoga or קהל kahal), is a Jewish house of prayer. Synagogues have a large place for prayer (the main sanctuary), and may also have smaller rooms for study and sometimes a social hall and offices. Some have a separate room for Torah
Torah
study, called the בית מדרש‬ beth midrash "house of study". Synagogues are consecrated spaces used for the purpose of prayer, Tanakh
Tanakh
(the entire Hebrew Bible, including the Torah) reading, study and assembly; however, a synagogue is not necessary for worship. Halakha holds that communal Jewish worship can be carried out wherever ten Jews
Jews
(a minyan) assemble
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Legislative Branch
A legislature is a deliberative assembly with the authority to make laws for a political entity such as a country or city. Legislatures form important parts of most governments; in the separation of powers model, they are often contrasted with the executive and judicial branches of government. Laws enacted by legislatures are known as legislation. Legislatures observe and steer governing actions and usually have exclusive authority to amend the budget or budgets involved in the process. The members of a legislature are called legislators
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Arabic Language
Arabic
Arabic
(Arabic: العَرَبِيَّة‎) al-ʻarabiyyah [ʔalʕaraˈbijːah] ( listen) or (Arabic: عَرَبِيّ‎) ʻarabī [ˈʕarabiː] ( listen) or [ʕaraˈbij]) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world.[4] It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
in the east to the Anti- Lebanon
Lebanon
mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic
Arabic
is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form (Modern Standard Arabic) [5]. The modern written language (Modern Standard Arabic) is derived from Classical Arabic
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D'Hondt Method
The D'Hondt method[a] or the Jefferson method is a highest averages method for allocating seats, and is thus a type of party-list proportional representation. The method described is named in United States after Thomas Jefferson, who introduced the method for proportional allocation of seats in the United States
United States
House of Representatives in 1791, and in Europe after Belgian mathematician Victor D'Hondt, who described it in 1878 for proportional allocation of parliamentary seats to the parties. There are two forms: closed list (a party selects the order of election of their candidates) and an open list (voters' choices determine the order). Proportional representation
Proportional representation
systems aim to allocate seats to parties approximately in proportion to the number of votes received. For example, if a party wins one-third of the votes then it should gain about one-third of the seats
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Party-list Proportional Representation
Party-list proportional representation
Party-list proportional representation
systems are a family of voting systems emphasizing proportional representation (PR) in elections in which multiple candidates are elected (e.g., elections to parliament) through allocations to an electoral list. They can also be used as part of mixed additional member systems.[1] In these systems, parties make lists of candidates to be elected, and seats get distributed to each party in proportion to the number of votes the party receives
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Israeli Labor Party
Israeli
Israeli
may refer to:Israelis, citizens or permanent residents of the State of Israel Modern Hebrew, a language Israeli
Israeli
(newspaper), published from 2006 to 2008 Something of, from, or related to the State of IsraelSee also
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Voting System
An electoral system is a set of rules that determines how elections and referendums are conducted and how their results are determined. Political electoral systems are organized by governments, while non-political elections may take place in business, non-profit organisations and informal organisations. Electoral systems consist of sets of rules that govern all aspects of the voting process: when elections occur, who is allowed to vote, who can stand as a candidate, how ballots are marked and cast, how the ballots are counted (electoral method), limits on campaign spending, and other factors that can affect the outcome
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Independent (politician)
An independent or nonpartisan politician is an individual politician not affiliated with any political party
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Degel HaTorah
Degel Ha Torah
Torah
(Hebrew: דגל התורה‬, lit. Banner of the Torah) is an Ashkenazi Haredi political party in Israel. For much of its existence, it has been allied with Agudat Yisrael
Agudat Yisrael
under the name United Torah
Torah
Judaism.Contents1 Ideology 2 History 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksIdeology[edit] Degel Ha Torah
Torah
represents the "Lithuanian wing" of the non-Hasidic Haredim
Haredim
(known by some as "Mitnagdim"), as opposed to the Hasidic-dominated Agudat Yisrael
Agudat Yisrael
party
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Hebrew Language
Hebrew (/ˈhiːbruː/; עִבְרִית, Ivrit [ʔivˈʁit] ( listen) or [ʕivˈɾit] ( listen)) is a Northwest Semitic language native to Israel, spoken by over 9 million people worldwide.[8][9] Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites
Israelites
and their ancestors, although the language was not referred to by the name Hebrew in the Tanakh.[note 1] The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date from the 10th century BCE.[10] Hebrew belongs to the West Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family
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West Jerusalem
Coordinates: 31°46′55″N 35°13′10″E / 31.78194°N 35.21944°E / 31.78194; 35.21944 Jerusalem
Jerusalem
municipal area between 1948 and 1967West Jerusalem
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Constructive Vote Of No Confidence
The constructive vote of no confidence (in German: konstruktives Misstrauensvotum, in Spanish: moción de censura constructiva) is a variation on the motion of no confidence which allows a parliament to withdraw confidence from a head of government only if there is a positive majority for a prospective successor
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Unicameral
In government, unicameralism (Latin uni, one + camera, chamber) is the practice of having one legislative or parliamentary chamber. Thus, a unicameral parliament or unicameral legislature is a legislature which consists of one chamber or house.Contents1 Concept 2 List of unicameral legislatures2.1 National 2.2 Territorial 2.3 Subnational2.3.1 Federations 2.3.2 Devolved governments 2.3.3 Other3 List of historical Unicameral legislatures3.1 National 3.2 Subnational4 Unicameralism
Unicameralism
within the subdivisions of the United States 5 Unicameralism
Unicameralism
in the Philippines 6 ReferencesConcept[edit] Unicameral legislatures exist when there is no widely perceived need for multicameralism. Many multicameral legislatures were created to give separate voices to different sectors of society
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List Of Legislatures By Country
This is a list of legislatures by country. A "legislature" is the generic name for the National parliaments and congresses that act as a plenary general assembly of representatives and that have the power to legislate
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Ta'al
Ta'al
Ta'al
(Hebrew: תַּעַ"ל‬, an acronym for Tnu'a Aravit LeHithadshut (Hebrew: תְּנוּעָה עֲרָבִית לְהִתְחַדְּשׁוּת‬), lit. Arab Movement for Renewal, Arabic: الحركة العربية للتغيير‎) is an Israeli Arab political party in Israel
Israel
led by Ahmad Tibi. The party was part of the Joint List
Joint List
in the 2015 election. History[edit] Ta'al
Ta'al
was founded by Tibi in the mid 1990s. It ran in the 1996 elections under the name Arab Union, but won only 2,087 votes (0.1%). For the 1999 elections it ran as part of the Balad list. Tibi won a seat, and broke away from Balad on 21 December that year. In the 2003 elections the party ran on a joint list with Hadash, with Tibi retaining his seat. On 7 February 2006 Tibi left the alliance with Hadash
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