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Kilowatt
The WATT (symbol: W) is a derived unit of power in the International System of Units (SI) defined as 1 joule per second and can be used to quantify the rate of energy transfer . Power has dimensions of M L 2 T 3 {displaystyle {mathsf {ML}}^{2}{mathsf {T}}^{-3}} . CONTENTS * 1 Examples * 2 Origin and adoption as an SI unit * 3 Multiples * 3.1 Femtowatt * 3.2 Picowatt * 3.3 Nanowatt * 3.4 Microwatt * 3.5 Milliwatt * 3.6 Kilowatt * 3.7 Megawatt * 3.8 Gigawatt * 3.9 Terawatt * 3.10 Petawatt * 4 Conventions in the electric power industry * 5 Radio
Radio
transmission * 6 Difference between watts, watt-hours and watts per hour * 7 See also * 8 Notes * 9 References * 10 External links EXAMPLESWhen an object's velocity is held constant at one meter per second against constant opposing force of one newton the rate at which work is done is 1 watt
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British Science Association
The BRITISH SCIENCE ASSOCIATION (BSA) is a charity and learned society founded in 1831 to aid in the promotion and development of science. Until 2009 it was known as the BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE (BA). CONTENTS* 1 History * 1.1 Foundation * 1.2 Electrical standards * 1.3 Other * 2 Perception of science in the UK * 2.1 British Science Festival * 2.2 Science Communication Conference * 2.3 British Science Week * 3 Presidents of the British Science Association
British Science Association
* 4 List of Annual Meetings * 5 Structure * 6 See also * 7 References * 8 External links * 8.1 Video clips HISTORYFOUNDATION The former British Science Association
British Science Association
logo launched in 2009 Old logo used for "The BA" The Association was founded in 1831 and modelled on the German Gesellschaft Deutscher Naturforscher und Ärzte
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Thermal Power Plant
A THERMAL POWER STATION is a power plant in which heat energy is converted to electric power . In most of the places in the world the turbine is steam -driven. Water is heated, turns into steam and spins a steam turbine which drives an electrical generator . After it passes through the turbine, the steam is condensed in a condenser and recycled to where it was heated; this is known as a Rankine cycle
Rankine cycle
. The greatest variation in the design of thermal power stations is due to the different heat sources; fossil fuel dominates here, although nuclear heat energy and solar heat energy are also used. Some prefer to use the term energy center because such facilities convert forms of heat energy into electrical energy. Certain thermal power plants also are designed to produce heat energy for industrial purposes, or district heating , or desalination of water, in addition to generating electrical power
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General Conference On Weights And Measures
The GENERAL CONFERENCE ON WEIGHTS AND MEASURES (French : Conférence générale des poids et mesures – CGPM) is the senior of the three Inter-governmental organizations established in 1875 under the terms of the Metre Convention (French : Convention du Mètre) to represent the interests of member states. The treaty, which also set up two further bodies, the International Committee for Weights and Measures (French : Comité international des poids et mesures – CIPM) and the International Bureau of Weights and Measures
International Bureau of Weights and Measures
(French : Bureau international des poids et mesures – BIPM), was drawn up to coordinate international metrology and to coordinate the development of the metric system . The conference meets in Sèvres (south-west of Paris) every four to six years
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Radio
RADIO is the technology of using radio waves to carry information, such as sound, by systematically modulating properties of electromagnetic energy waves transmitted through space, such as their amplitude , frequency , phase , or pulse width . When radio waves strike an electrical conductor , the oscillating fields induce an alternating current in the conductor. The information in the waves can be extracted and transformed back into its original form. Radio
Radio
systems need a transmitter to modulate (change) some property of the energy produced to impress a signal on it, for example using amplitude modulation or angle modulation (which can be frequency modulation or phase modulation ). Radio
Radio
systems also need an antenna to convert electric currents into radio waves , and radio waves into an electric current. An antenna can be used for both transmitting and receiving
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Steam Engine
A STEAM ENGINE is a heat engine that performs mechanical work using steam as its working fluid . Steam
Steam
engines are external combustion engines , where the working fluid is separated from the combustion products. Non-combustion heat sources such as solar power , nuclear power or geothermal energy may be used. The ideal thermodynamic cycle used to analyze this process is called the Rankine cycle
Rankine cycle
. In the cycle, water is heated and transforms into steam within a boiler operating at a high pressure. When expanded through pistons or turbines, mechanical work is done. The reduced pressure steam is then exhausted to the atmosphere, or condensed and pumped back into the boiler
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Electrical Resistance
The ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE of an electrical conductor is a measure of the difficulty to pass an electric current through that conductor. The inverse quantity is ELECTRICAL CONDUCTANCE, and is the ease with which an electric current passes. Electrical resistance shares some conceptual parallels with the notion of mechanical friction . The SI unit of electrical resistance is the ohm (Ω ), while electrical conductance is measured in siemens (S). An object of uniform cross section has a resistance proportional to its resistivity and length and inversely proportional to its cross-sectional area. All materials show some resistance, except for superconductors , which have a resistance of zero
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Volt
The VOLT (symbol: V) is the derived unit for electric potential , electric potential difference (voltage ), and electromotive force . It is named after the Italian physicist Alessandro Volta (1745–1827). CONTENTS* 1 Definition * 1.1 Josephson junction definition * 2 Water-flow analogy * 3 Common voltages * 4 History * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 External links DEFINITIONOne volt is defined as the difference in electric potential between two points of a conducting wire when an electric current of one ampere dissipates one watt of power between those points. It is also equal to the potential difference between two parallel, infinite planes spaced 1 meter apart that create an electric field of 1 newton per coulomb . Additionally, it is the potential difference between two points that will impart one joule of energy per coulomb of charge that passes through it
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Watt (other)
WATT
WATT
(W) is the SI (Système International) unit of power named after the Scottish engineer James Watt
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Ohm
The OHM (symbol: Ω ) is the SI derived unit
SI derived unit
of electrical resistance , named after German physicist Georg Simon Ohm . Although several empirically derived standard units for expressing electrical resistance were developed in connection with early telegraphy practice, the British Association for the Advancement of Science proposed a unit derived from existing units of mass, length and time and of a convenient size for practical work as early as 1861. The definition of the ohm was revised several times. Today the definition of the ohm is expressed from the quantum Hall effect . CONTENTS * 1 Definition * 2 Conversions * 3 Power as a function of resistance * 4 History * 4.1 Historical units of resistance * 5 Realization of standards * 6 Symbol * 7 See also * 8 Notes and references * 9 External links DEFINITION A multimeter can be used to measure resistance in ohms, among other things
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Radar
RADAR is an object-detection system that uses radio waves to determine the range, angle, or velocity of objects. It can be used to detect aircraft , ships , spacecraft , guided missiles , motor vehicles , weather formations , and terrain . A radar system consists of a transmitter producing electromagnetic waves in the radio or microwaves domain, a transmitting antenna , a receiving antenna (often the same antenna is used for transmitting and receiving) and a receiver and processor to determine properties of the object(s). Radio waves (pulsed or continuous) from the transmitter reflect off the object and return to the receiver, giving information about the object's location and speed. Radar
Radar
was developed secretly for military use by several nations in the period before and during World War II
World War II

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Radio Astronomy
RADIO ASTRONOMY is a subfield of astronomy that studies celestial objects at radio frequencies . The first detection of radio waves from an astronomical object was in 1932, when Karl Jansky at Bell Telephone Laboratories observed radiation coming from the Milky Way . Subsequent observations have identified a number of different sources of radio emission. These include stars and galaxies , as well as entirely new classes of objects, such as radio galaxies , quasars , pulsars , and masers . The discovery of the cosmic microwave background radiation , regarded as evidence for the Big Bang theory , was made through radio astronomy. Radio astronomy is conducted using large radio antennas referred to as radio telescopes , that are either used singularly, or with multiple linked telescopes utilizing the techniques of radio interferometry and aperture synthesis
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Audio Signal
An AUDIO SIGNAL is a representation of sound , typically as an electrical voltage . Audio signals have frequencies in the audio frequency range of roughly 20 to 20,000 Hz (the limits of human hearing ). Audio signals may be synthesized directly, or may originate at a transducer such as a microphone , musical instrument pickup , phonograph cartridge, or tape head . Loudspeakers or headphones convert an electrical audio signal into sound. Digital representations of audio signals exist in a variety of formats. An AUDIO CHANNEL or AUDIO TRACK is an audio signal communications channel in a storage device , used in operations such as multi-track recording and sound reinforcement . CONTENTS * 1 Signal flow * 2 Parameters * 3 Digital equivalent * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links SIGNAL FLOWSignal flow is the path an audio signal will take from source (microphone ) to the speaker or recording device
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DBm
DBM (sometimes DBMW or decibel-milliwatts) is an abbreviation for the power ratio in decibels (dB) of the measured power referenced to one milliwatt (mW). It is used in radio, microwave and fiber-optical networks as a convenient measure of absolute power because of its capability to express both very large and very small values in a short form. Compare dBW , which is referenced to one watt (1000 mW). Since it is referenced to the watt , it is an absolute unit, used when measuring absolute power. By comparison, the decibel (DB) is a dimensionless unit , used for quantifying the ratio between two values, such as signal-to-noise ratio . In audio and telephony, dBm is typically referenced relative to a 600-ohm impedance, while in radio-frequency work dBm is typically referenced relative to a 50-ohm impedance. CONTENTS * 1 Unit conversions * 2 See also * 3 References * 4 External links UNIT CONVERSIONSA power level of 0 dBm corresponds to a power of 1 milliwatt
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KiloWatts (musician)
JAMES WATTS, also known by the moniker KiloWatts, is an American electronic musician. He has toured across Australia, Canada, Europe, and the United States since 2002. His 2007 release Ground State was said to lead the devoted listener to a state of total hypnosis by Side-Line Magazine . In 2006, Igloo Magazine called his album Routes "a lifetime of travel compressed into an hour of aural head-tripping." His project with Tanner Ross, entitled Voodeux, was reviewed by XLR8R Magazine and could only be described as "...if maverick producers Ricardo Villalobos
Ricardo Villalobos
and Bruno Pronsato plundered Lustmord
Lustmord
's harddrive full of tar-black ambience..." His collaboration with Bluetech , called Invisible Allies, was included in Headphone Commute's Best Of 2010 collection
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Electromagnetic Radiation
In physics , ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION (EM RADIATION or EMR) refers to the waves (or their quanta, photons ) of the electromagnetic field , propagating (radiating) through space carrying electromagnetic radiant energy . It includes radio waves , microwaves , infrared , (visible) light , ultraviolet , X- , and gamma radiation. Classically , electromagnetic radiation consists of ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES, which are synchronized oscillations of electric and magnetic fields that propagate at the speed of light through a vacuum . The oscillations of the two fields are perpendicular to each other and perpendicular to the direction of energy and wave propagation, forming a transverse wave . The wavefront of electromagnetic waves emitted from a point source (such as a lightbulb) is a sphere . The position of an electromagnetic wave within the electromagnetic spectrum could be characterized by either its frequency of oscillation or its wavelength
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