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Incumbent
The incumbent is the current holder of a political office. This term is usually used in reference to elections, in which races can often be defined as being between an incumbent and non-incumbent(s). For example, in the Hungarian presidential election, 2017, János Áder was the incumbent, because he had been the president in the term before the term for which the election sought to determine the president
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Barcelona Open (tennis)
The Barcelona Open (currently sponsored by Banc Sabadell) is an annual tennis tournament for male professional players. The event has been held in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain every year since 1953, and is played on clay courts at the Real Club de Tenis Barcelona. It was an event of the Grand Prix tennis circuit between (1970–1989), except in 1971 when it was part of the World Championship Tennis (WCT) circuit, although it was also open to non-WCT players. The tournament is part of the 500 series on the ATP World Tour. It is also known as Torneo Godó, Trofeo Conde de Godó, and Open Banc Sabadell. It is Spain's second most important tournament on the ATP tour after the Madrid Open and the event generally takes place in the last week of April, when temperatures in Barcelona average a daily high of 19 °C (66 °F)
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Re-election (Football League)
The Re-election system of the Football League, in use until 1986, was a process where the worst placed clubs of the league had to reapply for their place in the league while non-league clubs could apply for a league place. It was the only way for a non-league side to enter the Football League until direct promotion and relegation were introduced from the 1986–87 season onwards. The clubs placed on a re-election rank at the end of a season had to face their Football League peers at the Annual General Meeting of the league
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Oxford English Dictionary
The Oxford
Oxford
English Dictionary (OED) is the main historical dictionary of the English language, published by the Oxford University
Oxford University
Press. It traces the historical development of the English language, providing a comprehensive resource to scholars and academic researchers, as well as describing usage in its many variations throughout the world.[2][3] The second edition came to 21,728 pages in 20 volumes, published in 1989. Work began on the dictionary in 1857, but it was not until 1884 that it began to be published in unbound fascicles as work continued on the project, under the name of A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles; Founded Mainly on the Materials Collected by The Philological Society
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International Standard Serial Number
An International Standard Serial Number
International Standard Serial Number
(ISSN) is an eight-digit serial number used to uniquely identify a serial publication.[1] The ISSN is especially helpful in distinguishing between serials with the same title. ISSN are used in ordering, cataloging, interlibrary loans, and other practices in connection with serial literature.[2] The ISSN system was first drafted as an International Organization for Standardization (ISO) international standard in 1971 and published as ISO 3297 in 1975.[3] ISO subcommittee TC 46/SC 9 is responsible for maintaining the standard. When a serial with the same content is published in more than one media type, a different ISSN is assigned to each media type. For example, many serials are published both in print and electronic media
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Outgoing Politician
An outgoing politician is an elected or appointed politician that is serving at some point between the time of the election or appointment of his or her successor and the inauguration or date by which the successor assumes power.[1] For heads of state, the terms used are outgoing president and outgoing prime minister, among others. In many countries, toward the facilitation of a smooth transition, an outgoing president accepts advice from and consults with the president-elect. The term lame duck is often ascribed to an outgoing elected official in view of his relative impotence and impending exit from office, especially where his political party has lost control of a legislative or executive branch. References[edit]^ Richard Lederer (30 June 2012). "This Election
Election
Could Be a Real Horse Race". U-T San Diego. Retrieved 22 December 2012. This article about a political term is a stub
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List Of Current Heads Of State And Government
This is a list of current heads of state and heads of government. In some cases, mainly in presidential systems, there is only one leader being both head of state and head of government. In other cases, mainly in semi-presidential and parliamentary systems, the head of state and the head of government are different people. In semi-presidential and parliamentary systems, the head of government role (i.e
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Anti-incumbency
An anti-incumbent vote is one exercised against elected officials currently in power. It allows the voters to register their discontent with sitting government officials, particularly when protesting against certain actions taken by the government or the elected officials in question. See also[edit]Politics portalElectoral landslide Finnish parliamentary election, 2011References[edit]www.opensecrets.org on re-electThis article about a political term is a stub
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Sophomore Surge
A sophomore surge (sometimes referred to in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
as first-term incumbency bonus[1][2]) is a term used in the political science of the United States Congress
United States Congress
that refers to an increase in votes that congressional candidates (candidates for the House of Representatives) usually receive when running for their first re-election. The phrase has been adopted in Australia
Australia
by psephologist Malcolm Mackerras who is well known for his electoral pendulums. History[edit] This phenomenon first started in the 1960s
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Off-year Election
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Congressional districtsUnited States SenatePresident <
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The Journal Of Politics
The Journal of Politics
Politics
is a peer-reviewed academic journal of political science established in 1939 and published quarterly (February, May, August and November) by University of Chicago Press
University of Chicago Press
on behalf of the Southern Political Science Association. According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2015 impact factor of 1.840, ranking it 24th out of 163 journals in the category "Political Science".[1] See also[edit]List of political science journalsReferences[edit]^ "Journals Ranked by Impact: Political Science". 2015 Journal Citation Reports. Web of Science
Web of Science
(Social Sciences ed.). Thomson Reuters. 2016. External links[edit]Official website Online AccessThis article about a journal on politics or political science is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eSee tips for writing articles about academic journals
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British Journal Of Political Science
British Journal of Political Science is a quarterly peer-reviewed academic journal covering all aspects of political science.Contents1 Abstracting and indexing 2 Awards 3 Notable staff 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksAbstracting and indexing[edit] The journal is abstracted and indexed in EBSCOhost, International Political Science Abstracts, Current Contents/Social & Behavioral Sciences, PAIS International, Social Sciences Citation Index, CSA Worldwide Political Science Abstracts, International Bibliography of Periodical Literature and International Bibliography of Book Reviews of Scholarly Literature and Social Sciences
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Legislature
A legislature is a deliberative assembly with the authority to make laws for a political entity such as a country or city. Legislatures form important parts of most governments; in the separation of powers model, they are often contrasted with the executive and judicial branches of government. Laws enacted by legislatures are known as legislation. Legislatures observe and steer governing actions and usually have exclusive authority to amend the budget or budgets involved in the process. The members of a legislature are called legislators
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Single-member Constituency
A single-member district or single-member constituency is an electoral district that returns one officeholder to a body with multiple members such as a legislature. This is also sometimes called single-winner voting or winner takes all. The alternative are multi-member districts, or the election of a body by the whole electorate voting as one constituency. A number of electoral systems use single-member districts, including plurality voting (first past the post), two-round systems, instant-runoff voting (IRV), approval voting, range voting, Borda count, and Condorcet methods (such as the Minimax Condorcet, Schulze method, and Ranked Pairs). Of these, plurality and runoff voting are the most common. In some countries, such as Australia and India, members of the lower house of parliament are elected from single-member districts; and members of the upper house are elected from multi-member districts
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