HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Horsepower
Horsepower
Horsepower
(hp) is a unit of measurement of power (the rate at which work is done). There are many different standards and types of horsepower. Two common definitions being used today are the mechanical horsepower (or imperial horsepower), which is 745.7 watts, and the metric horsepower, which is approximately 735.5 watts. The term was adopted in the late 18th century by Scottish engineer James Watt
Watt
to compare the output of steam engines with the power of draft horses. It was later expanded to include the output power of other types of piston engines, as well as turbines, electric motors and other machinery.[1][2] The definition of the unit varied among geographical regions. Most countries now use the SI unit watt for measurement of power
[...More...]

"Horsepower" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

John Theophilus Desaguliers
John Theophilus Desaguliers
John Theophilus Desaguliers
(12 March 1683 – 29 February 1744) was a French-born British natural philosopher, clergyman, engineer and freemason who was elected to the Royal Society
Royal Society
in 1714 as experimental assistant to Isaac Newton. He had studied at Oxford and later popularized Newtonian theories and their practical applications in public lectures. Desaguliers’s most important patron was James Brydges, 1st Duke of Chandos
[...More...]

"John Theophilus Desaguliers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Basal Rate
Basal rate, in biology, is the rate of continuous supply of some chemical or process. In the case of diabetes mellitus, it is a low rate of continuous insulin supply needed for such purposes as controlling cellular glucose and amino acid uptake. Together with a bolus of insulin, the basal insulin completes the total insulin needs of an insulin-dependent person. An insulin pump and wristop controller is one way to arrange for a closely controlled basal insulin rate. The slow-release insulins (e.g., Lantus and Levemir) can provide a similar effect. In healthy individuals, basal rate is monitored by the pancreas, which provides a regular amount of insulin at all times. The body requires this flow of insulin to enable the body to utilize glucose in the blood stream, so the energy in glucose can be used to carry out bodily functions. Basal rate
Basal rate
requirements can differ for individuals depending on the activities they will carry out on that particular day
[...More...]

"Basal Rate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Newcomen Steam Engine
The atmospheric engine was invented by Thomas Newcomen
Thomas Newcomen
in 1712, and is often referred to simply as a Newcomen engine. The engine operated by condensing steam drawn into the cylinder, thereby creating a partial vacuum, thereby allowing the atmospheric pressure to push the piston into the cylinder. It was the first practical device to harness steam to produce mechanical work.[1][2] Newcomen engines were used throughout Britain and Europe, principally to pump water out of mines. Hundreds were constructed through the 18th century. James Watt's later engine design was an improved version of the Newcomen engine that roughly doubled fuel efficiency. Many atmospheric engines were converted to the Watt design, for a price based on a fraction of the savings in fuel
[...More...]

"Newcomen Steam Engine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Horse Mill
A horse mill is a mill, sometimes used in conjunction with a watermill or windmill, that uses a horse as the power source. Any milling process can be powered in this way, but the most frequent use of animal power in horse mills was for grinding grain and pumping water. Other animal engines for powering mills are powered by dogs, donkeys, oxen or camels. Treadwheels are engines powered by humans. In Antwerp, Belgium, the Brewers' House museum[1] is a good example of horse-powered pumping machinery
[...More...]

"Horse Mill" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Force
In physics, a force is any interaction that, when unopposed, will change the motion of an object.[1] A force can cause an object with mass to change its velocity (which includes to begin moving from a state of rest), i.e., to accelerate. Force
Force
can also be described intuitively as a push or a pull. A force has both magnitude and direction, making it a vector quantity. It is measured in the SI unit of newtons and represented by the symbol F. The original form of Newton's second law
Newton's second law
states that the net force acting upon an object is equal to the rate at which its momentum changes with time
[...More...]

"Force" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

John Smeaton
John Smeaton
John Smeaton
FRS (8 June 1724 – 28 October 1792) was a British civil engineer responsible for the design of bridges, canals, harbours and lighthouses.[1] He was also a capable mechanical engineer and an eminent physicist. Smeaton was the first self-proclaimed "civil engineer", and is often regarded as the "father of civil engineering".[2] He pioneered the use of hydraulic lime in concrete, using pebbles and powdered brick as aggregate.[3] Smeaton was associated with the Lunar Society.Contents1 Law and physics 2 Smeaton coefficient 3 Civil engineering 4 Mechanical engineer 5 Legacy 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksLaw and physics[edit] Smeaton was born in Austhorpe, Leeds, England
[...More...]

"John Smeaton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hewlett-Packard
Coordinates: 37°24′49″N 122°08′42″W / 37.413579°N 122.14508°W / 37.413579; -122.14508 Hewlett-Packard
Hewlett-Packard
CompanyLast logo of Hewlett-Packard
Hewlett-Packard
used from 2010 to 2015; now used by HP Inc.HP headquarters in Palo Alto, California, U.S.Former typePublicTraded as NYSE: HPQIndustry Computer hardware Computer software IT services IT consultingFate Renamed as HP Inc.Successor HP Inc. Hewlett Packard EnterpriseFounded January 1, 1939; 79 years ago (1939-01-01)Founders William Redington Hewlett
William Redington Hewlett
and David PackardDefunct November 1, 2015 (2015-11-01) (main company) (For Hewlett Packard Enterprise)
[...More...]

"Hewlett-Packard" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Draft Horses
A draft horse (US), draught horse (UK and Commonwealth) or dray horse (from the Old English
Old English
dragan meaning "to draw or haul"; compare Dutch dragen and German tragen meaning "to carry" and Danish drage meaning "to draw" or "to fare"), less often called a carthorse, work horse or heavy horse, is a large horse bred to be a working animal doing hard tasks such as plowing and other farm labor. There are a number of breeds, with varying characteristics, but all share common traits of strength, patience, and a docile temperament which made them indispensable to generations of pre-industrial farmers. Draft horses and draft crossbreds are versatile breeds used today for a multitude of purposes, including farming, draft horse showing, logging, recreation, and other uses. They are also commonly used for crossbreeding, especially to light riding breeds such as the Thoroughbred, for the purpose of creating sport horses of warmblood type
[...More...]

"Draft Horses" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Human-powered Equipment
Human power
Human power
is work or energy that is produced from the human body. It can also refer to the power (rate of work per time) of a human. Power comes primarily from muscles, but body heat is also used to do work like warming shelters, food, or other humans. World records of power performance by humans are of interest to work planners and work-process engineers. The average level of human power that can be maintained over a certain duration of time, say over the extent of one minute or one hour is interesting to engineers designing work operations in industry
[...More...]

"Human-powered Equipment" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Thomas Savery
Thomas Savery
Thomas Savery
(/ˈseɪvəri/; c. 1650 – 1715) was an English inventor and engineer, born at Shilstone, a manor house near Modbury, Devon, England. He is famous for his invention of the first commercially used steam powered powered device, a steam pump which is often referred to as an "engine". Savery's "engine" was a revolutionary method of pumping water, which solved the problem of mine drainage and made widespread public water supply practical.Contents1 Career1.1 First steam engine mechanism 1.2 Fire Engine Act 1.3 Application of the engine2 Comparison with Newcomen engine 3 Inspiration for later work 4 See also 5 Notes 6 Further reading 7 External linksCareer[edit] Savery became a military engineer, rising to the rank of Captain by 1702, and spent his free time performing experiments in mechanics
[...More...]

"Thomas Savery" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Minute
The minute is a unit of time or angle. As a unit of time, the minute is equal to ​1⁄60 (the first sexagesimal fraction[1]) of an hour, or 60 seconds. In the UTC time standard, a minute on rare occasions has 61 seconds, a consequence of leap seconds (there is a provision to insert a negative leap second, which would result in a 59-second minute, but this has never happened in more than 40 years under this system). As a unit of angle, the minute of arc is equal to ​1⁄60 of a degree, or 60 seconds (of arc). Although not an SI unit for either time or angle, the minute is accepted for use with SI units for both.[2] The SI symbols for minute or minutes are min for time measurement, and the prime symbol after a number, e.g. 5′, for angle measurement
[...More...]

"Minute" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Usain Bolt
Usain St Leo Bolt OJ CD (/ˈjuːseɪn/; born 21 August 1986) is a retired Jamaican sprinter and world record holder in the 100 metres, 200 metres
200 metres
and 4 × 100 metres
100 metres
relay. His reign as Olympic Games champion in all of these events spans multiple Olympics. Due to his achievements and dominance in sprint competition, he is widely considered to be the greatest sprinter of all time.[9][10][11][12] An eight-time Olympic gold medalist, Bolt won the 100 m, 200 m and 4 × 100 m
100 m
relay at three consecutive Olympic Games (although he subsequently forfeited one of the gold medals (as well as the world record set therein) nine years after the fact due to a teammate's disqualification for doping offences)
[...More...]

"Usain Bolt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

US Gal
Gal, an alteration of girl, is a casual term for a woman. Gal
Gal
may also refer to:Contents1 People1.1 Surname 1.2 Given name or nickname 1.3 Pseudonym or nom de guerre2 Places 3 Politics and law 4 Science 5 Technology 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPeople[edit] Surname[edit]Gál, a Hungarian surname Andreas Gal
An

[...More...]

"US Gal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Pound-foot (torque)
A pound-foot (lbf⋅ft or lb⋅ft) is a unit of torque (a pseudovector). One pound-foot is the torque created by one pound force acting at a perpendicular distance of one foot from a pivot point. Conversely one pound-foot is the moment about an axis that applies one pound-force at a radius of one foot. One pound-foot is approximately 1.355818 newton meters. The name "pound-foot", intended to minimize confusion with the foot-pound as a unit of work, was apparently first proposed by British physicist Arthur Mason Worthington.[1] However, the torque unit is often still referred to as the foot-pound (ft⋅lbf).[2] References[edit]^ Arthur Mason Worthington (1900). Dynamics of rotation : an elementary introduction to rigid dynamics (3rd ed.). Longmans, Green, and Co. p. 9.  ^ Erjavec, Jack. Manual Transmissions & Transaxles: Classroom manual. p. 38. ISBN 978-1-4354-3933-7. This classical mechanics-related article is a stub
[...More...]

"Pound-foot (torque)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Rotational Speed
Rotational speed (or speed of revolution) of an object rotating around an axis is the number of turns of the object divided by time, specified as revolutions per minute (rpm), revolutions per second (rev/s), or radians per second (rad/s).[1] The symbol for rotational speed is ω cyc displaystyle omega _ text cyc [citation needed](the Greek lowercase letter "omega"). Tangential speed v, rotational speed ω cyc displaystyle omega _ text cyc , and radial distance r, are related by the following equation:[2] v = 2 π r ω cyc displaystyle v=2pi romega _ text cyc v = r ω


[...More...]
"Rotational Speed" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.