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Hoisin Sauce
Hoisin sauce
Hoisin sauce
is a thick, fragrant sauce commonly used in Chinese cuisine as a glaze for meat, an addition to stir fries, or as dipping sauce. It is darkly colored in appearance and sweet and salty in taste. Although regional variants exist, hoisin sauce usually includes soy beans, fennel seeds, red chillies, and garlic. Vinegar, Chinese five spice and sugar are also commonly added. The word hoisin (海鮮, Cantonese: hoi2 sin1 Mandarin: hǎixiān) is Chinese for seafood, but the sauce does not contain any seafood ingredients.Contents1 Ingredients 2 Regional2.1 Chinese cuisine 2.2 Vietnamese cuisine3 See also 4 References 5 External linksIngredients[edit] Peking-style hoisin sauce ingredients include starches such as sweet potato, wheat or rice, and water, sugar, soybeans, sesame seeds, white distilled vinegar, salt, garlic, red chili peppers, and sometimes preservatives or coloring agents
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Jiaozi
Jiaozi
Jiaozi
([tɕjàu.tsɨ] ( listen)) are a kind of Chinese dumpling, commonly eaten in China
China
and other parts of East Asia. They are one of the major foods eaten during the Chinese New Year
Chinese New Year
and year-round in the northern provinces. Though considered part of Chinese cuisine, jiaozi are popular in other parts of Asia and in Western countries. Jiaozi
Jiaozi
typically consist of a ground meat and/or vegetable filling wrapped into a thinly rolled piece of dough, which is then sealed by pressing the edges together
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Seafood
Seafood
Seafood
is any form of sea life regarded as food by humans. Seafood prominently includes fish and shellfish. Shellfish
Shellfish
include various species of molluscs, crustaceans, and echinoderms. Historically, sea mammals such as whales and dolphins have been consumed as food, though that happens to a lesser extent in modern times. Edible sea plants, such as some seaweeds and microalgae, are widely eaten as seafood around the world, especially in Asia (see the category of sea vegetables). In North America, although not generally in the United Kingdom, the term "seafood" is extended to fresh water organisms eaten by humans, so all edible aquatic life may be referred to as seafood. For the sake of completeness, this article includes all edible aquatic life. The harvesting of wild seafood is usually known as fishing or hunting, and the cultivation and farming of seafood is known as aquaculture, or fish farming in the case of fish
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Soy Sauce
Soy sauce
Soy sauce
(also called soya sauce in British English)[1][2] is a liquid condiment of Chinese origin, made from a fermented paste of soybeans, roasted grain, brine, and Aspergillus oryzae
Aspergillus oryzae
or Aspergillus sojae molds.[3]
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Siu Haau Sauce
Siu haau sauce is the primary barbecue sauce used in Chinese and Cantonese
Cantonese
cuisine. It is used during the barbecue-cooking process as opposed to a flavoring sauce after the food is made. Siu haau sauce is not used for siu mei rotisserie style cooking; dishes such as char siu each have their own sauce. See also[edit]Food portalShacha sauce Satay sauce List of Chinese sauces List of saucesExternal links[edit] Siu haau sauce photov t e Barbecue
Barbecue
saucesAh-So Big Daddy's BBQ Sauce Bull's-Eye Barbecue
Barbecue
Sauce Hunt's Jim Beam's BBQ Sauce KC Masterpiece Maull's barbecue sauce Reggae Reggae Sauce Shacha sauce Siu haau sauceThis condiment-related article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article related to Chinese cuisine
Chinese cuisine
is a stub
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Sriracha Sauce
Sriracha (Thai: ศรีราชา, Thai pronunciation: [sǐːrāːt͡ɕʰāː]; English: /sɪˈrɑːtʃə/) is a type of hot sauce or chili sauce made from a paste of chili peppers, distilled vinegar, garlic, sugar, and salt.[2] It is named after the coastal city of Si Racha, in Chonburi Province of eastern Thailand, where it may have been first produced for dishes served at local seafood restaurants.[3]Contents1 Use 2 Origin 3 Variations3.1 Thailand 3.2 United States4 In popular culture 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksUse[edit]Sriraja Panich chili sauce by Thai Theparos Food Products (left) and Tương Ớt Sriracha (" Rooster
Rooster
Sauce") by Huy Fong Foods
Huy Fong Foods
(right)In Thailand, sriracha is frequently used as a dipping sauce, particularly for seafood
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Condiment
A condiment is a spice, sauce, or preparation that is added to food to impart a particular flavor, to enhance its flavor,[1] or in some cultures, to complement the dish. The term originally described pickled or preserved foods, but has shifted meaning over time.[2] Many condiments are available packaged in single-serving packets, like mustard or ketchup, particularly when supplied with take-out or fast-food meals. They are usually applied by the diner, but are sometimes added prior to serving; for example, in a sandwich made with ketchup, mustard or mayonnaise
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Spring Roll
Spring rolls are a large variety of filled, rolled appetizers or dim sum found in East Asian and Southeast Asian cuisine
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Food Coloring
Food
Food
coloring, or color additive, is any dye, pigment or substance that imparts color when it is added to food or drink. They come in many forms consisting of liquids, powders, gels, and pastes. Food coloring is used both in commercial food production and in domestic cooking
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Preservative
A preservative is a substance or a chemical that is added to products such as food, beverages, pharmaceutical drugs, paints, biological samples, cosmetics, wood, and many other products to prevent decomposition by microbial growth or by undesirable chemical changes. In general, preservation is implemented in two modes, chemical and physical. Chemical preservation entails adding chemical compounds to the product. Physical preservation entails processes such as refrigeration or drying.[1] Preservative
Preservative
food additives reduce the risk of foodborne infections, decrease microbial spoilage, and preserve fresh attributes and nutritional quality. Some physical techniques for food preservation include dehydration, UV-C radiation, freeze-drying, and refrigeration
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Chili Pepper
The chili pepper (also chile pepper, chilli pepper, or simply chilli[1]) from Nahuatl
Nahuatl
chīlli Nahuatl pronunciation: [ˈt͡ʃiːli] ( listen)) is the fruit of plants from the genus Capsicum, members of the nightshade family, Solanaceae.[2] They are widely used in many cuisines to add spiciness to dishes
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Traditional Chinese Characters
Traditional Chinese characters
Chinese characters
(traditional Chinese: 正體字/繁體字; simplified Chinese: 正体字/繁体字; Pinyin: Zhèngtǐzì/Fántǐzì) are Chinese characters
Chinese characters
in any character set that does not contain newly created characters or character substitutions performed after 1946. They are most commonly the characters in the standardized character sets of Taiwan, of Hong Kong and Macau
Macau
or in the Kangxi Dictionary
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Rice
Rice
Rice
is the seed of the grass species Oryza sativa
Oryza sativa
(Asian rice) or Oryza glaberrima
Oryza glaberrima
(African rice). As a cereal grain, it is the most widely consumed staple food for a large part of the world's human population, especially in Asia
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Wheat
References:   Serial No. 42236 ITIS 2002-09-22 Wheat
Wheat
is a grass widely cultivated for its seed, a cereal grain which is a worldwide staple food.[1][2][3] There are many species of wheat which together make up the genus Triticum; the most widely grown is common wheat (T. aestivum). The archaeological record suggests that wheat was first cultivated in the regions of the Fertile Crescent
Fertile Crescent
around 9600 BCE
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Sweet Potato
The sweet potato ( Ipomoea
Ipomoea
batatas) is a dicotyledonous plant that belongs to the bindweed or morning glory family, Convolvulaceae. Its large, starchy, sweet-tasting, tuberous roots are a root vegetable.[1][2] The young leaves and shoots are sometimes eaten as greens. The sweet potato is only distantly related to the potato (Solanum tuberosum) and does not belong to the nightshade family, Solanaceae, but both families belong to the same taxonomic order, the Solanales. The plant is a herbaceous perennial vine, bearing alternate heart-shaped or palmately lobed leaves and medium-sized sympetalous flowers. The edible tuberous root is long and tapered, with a smooth skin whose color ranges between yellow, orange, red, brown, purple, and beige. Its flesh ranges from beige through white, red, pink, violet, yellow, orange, and purple
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