HOME ListMoto.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Garlic Sauce
Garlic
Garlic
sauce is a sauce prepared using garlic as a primary ingredient. It is typically a pungent sauce, with the depth of garlic flavor determined by the amount of garlic used. The garlic is typically crushed or finely diced. Simple garlic sauce is composed of garlic and another ingredient to suspend the tuber via emulsion, such as oil, butter or mayonnaise
[...More...]

"Garlic Sauce" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hummus
Hummus
Hummus
(/ˈhʊm.əs/, /ˈxʊm.ʊs/, or /ˈhʌm.əs/;[1][2][3] Arabic: حُمُّص‎, full Arabic name: hummus bi tahini Arabic: حمص بالطحينة‎) is a Levantine dip or spread made from cooked, mashed chickpeas or other beans, blended with tahini, olive oil, lemon juice, salt and garlic.[4] It is popular in the Middle East
[...More...]

"Hummus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Greek Cuisine
Greek cuisine
Greek cuisine
(Greek: Ελληνική κουζίνα, Elliniki kouzina) is a Mediterranean
Mediterranean
cuisine.[1] Contemporary Greek cookery makes wide use of vegetables, olive oil, grains, fish, wine (white and red), and meat (including lamb, poultry, veal, beef, rabbit and pork). Other important ingredients include olives, cheese, lemon juice, herbs, bread and yoghurt. The most commonly used grain is wheat; barley is also used. Common dessert ingredients include nuts, honey, fruits, and filo pastry
[...More...]

"Greek Cuisine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Paste (food)
A food paste is a semi-liquid colloidal suspension, emulsion, or aggregation used in food preparation or eaten directly as a spread.[1] Pastes are often highly spicy or aromatic, are often prepared well in advance of actual usage, and are often made into a preserve for future use. Common pastes are some fruit preserves, curry pastes, and nut pastes. Purées are food pastes made from already cooked ingredients. Some food pastes are considered to be condiments and are used directly, while others are made into sauces, which are more liquidy than paste. Ketchup
Ketchup
and prepared mustard are pastes that are used both directly as condiments and as ingredients in sauces. Many food pastes are an intermediary stage in the preparation of food. Perhaps the most notable of such intermediary food pastes is dough
[...More...]

"Paste (food)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ramekin
A ramekin (/ˈræmɪkɪn/, /ˈræmkɪn/; also spelled ramequin) is a small glazed ceramic or glass bowl used for cooking and serving various dishes. Name[edit] The term is derived from the French ramequin, a cheese- or meat-based dish baked in a small mold
[...More...]

"Ramekin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sauce
In cooking a sauce is a liquid, cream, or semi-solid food served on or used in preparing other foods. Sauces are not normally consumed by themselves; they add flavor, moisture, and visual appeal to another dish. Sauce
Sauce
is a French word taken from the Latin
Latin
salsa, meaning salted. Possibly the oldest recorded European sauce is garum, the fish sauce used by the Ancient Greeks; while doubanjiang, the Chinese soy bean paste is mentioned in Rites of Zhou
Rites of Zhou
in 3rd century BC. Sauces need a liquid component, but some sauces (for example, pico de gallo salsa or chutney) may contain more solid components than liquid. Sauces are an essential element in cuisines all over the world. Sauces may be used for sweet or savory dishes. They may be prepared and served cold, like mayonnaise, prepared cold but served lukewarm like pesto, cooked and served warm like bechamel or cooked and served cold like apple sauce
[...More...]

"Sauce" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vegetable
In everyday usage, vegetables are certain parts of plants that are consumed by humans as food as part of a savory meal. Originally, the traditional term (still commonly used in biology) included the flowers, fruit, stems, leaves, roots, tubers, bark, seeds, and all other plant matter, although modern-day culinary usage of the term vegetable may exclude food derived from plants such as fruits, nuts, and cereal grains, but include seeds such as pulses; the term vegetable is somewhat arbitrary, and can be largely defined through culinary and cultural tradition. Originally, vegetables were collected from the wild by hunter-gatherers and entered cultivation in several parts of the world, probably during the period 10,000 BC to 7,000 BC, when a new agricultural way of life developed. At first, plants which grew locally would have been cultivated, but as time went on, trade brought exotic crops from elsewhere to add to domestic types
[...More...]

"Vegetable" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pita
Pita
Pita
(/ˈpɪtə/ or US: /ˈpiːtə/)[1] in Greek, sometimes spelled Pitta (mainly UK), also known as Arabic bread, Lebanese bread, or Syrian bread,[2][3][4] is a soft, slightly leavened flatbread baked from wheat flour, which originated in Western Asia,[4][5] most probably Mesopotamia
[...More...]

"Pita" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Egyptian Cuisine
Egyptian cuisine
Egyptian cuisine
is characterized by dishes such as ful medames, mashed fava beans; kushari, with lentils and pasta, a national dish; and molokhiya, bush okra stew. Egyptian cuisine
Egyptian cuisine
shares similarities with food of the Eastern Mediterranean region, such as rice-stuffed vegetables, grape leaves, shawerma, kebab and kofta. The cuisine makes heavy use of legumes, vegetables and fruit from Egypt's rich Nile Valley and Delta.Contents1 Features 2 Cheeses 3 Bread 4 Starters and salads 5 Main courses 6 Desserts 7 Cuisine
Cuisine
and religious practice 8 Beverages8.1 Tea 8.2 Coffee 8.3 Juices 8.4 Alcoholic beverages9 See also 10 References 11 External linksFeatures[edit]Spices commonly used in Egypt Egyptian cuisine
Egyptian cuisine
is notably conducive to vegetarian diets, as it relies heavily on legume and vegetable dishes
[...More...]

"Egyptian Cuisine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cassava
Manihot
Manihot
esculenta (commonly called cassava (/kəˈsɑːvə/), manioc, yuca, mandioca and Brazilian arrowroot[2]) is a woody shrub native to South America
South America
of the spurge family, Euphorbiaceae. It is extensively cultivated as an annual crop in tropical and subtropical regions for its edible starchy tuberous root, a major source of carbohydrates. Though it is often called yuca in Spanish and in the United States, it differs from yucca, an unrelated fruit-bearing shrub in the family Asparagaceae
[...More...]

"Cassava" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Koshary
Kushari, also koshari (Egyptian Arabic: كشرى‎, [ˈkoʃæɾi]), is an Egyptian dish originally made in the 19th century, made of rice, macaroni, and lentils mixed together, topped with a spiced tomato sauce, and garlic vinegar, and garnished with chickpeas and crispy fried onions. A sprinkling of garlic juice, or garlic vinegar, and hot sauce are optional.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Kushari originated in the mid 19th century, during a time when Egypt was a multi-cultural country in the middle of an economic boom. It was based on foods from India, such as khichdi (lentils and rice), and Italy (macaroni). Over time the dish has evolved through Egyptian soldiers, then Egyptian citizens.[1] Kushari used to be sold on food carts in its early years, and was introduced to restaurants later.[2] Kushari is widely popular among workers and laborers
[...More...]

"Koshary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Arab Cuisine Of The Persian Gulf
Arab cuisine of the Persian Gulf includes cuisines that are shared by the population in the coastal region of Eastern Arabia. Seafood is a very significant part of the diet of the inhabitants of the coast of the Persian Gulf. Fish is very popular, usually eaten with rice. The cuisine of eastern Arabia is different from the cuisine of the Arabs of Hejaz, Najd and other parts of Arabia. Harees is also a very popular dish in the region.Contents1 History 2 Ingredients 3 National cuisines 4 Culture 5 Influences 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit]Map of the Persian Gulf and surrounding countries.Fresh datesYoghurtOriginally, the Arabs of the Persian Gulf relied heavily on a diet of dates,[1] wheat, barley, rice and meat,[2] with little variety, and with a heavy emphasis on yogurt products, such as "leben" (لبن) (yogurt without butterfat)
[...More...]

"Arab Cuisine Of The Persian Gulf" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

French Cuisine
French cuisine
French cuisine
consists of the cooking traditions and practices from France. In the 14th century Guillaume Tirel, a court chef known as "Taillevent", wrote Le Viandier, one of the earliest recipe collections of medieval France. During that time, French cuisine
French cuisine
was heavily influenced by Italian cuisine. In the 17th century, chefs François Pierre La Varenne
François Pierre La Varenne
and Marie-Antoine Carême
Marie-Antoine Carême
spearheaded movements that shifted French cooking away from its foreign influences and developed France's own indigenous style. Cheese and wine are a major part of the cuisine
[...More...]

"French Cuisine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Greater Syria
The historic region of Syria
Syria
(Hieroglyphic Luwian: Sura/i; Greek: Συρία; in modern literature called Greater Syria, Syria-Palestine, or the Levant) is an area located east of the Mediterranean sea. The oldest attestation of the name Syria
Syria
is from the 8th century BC in a bilingual inscription in Hieroglyphic Luwian and Phoenician. In this inscription the Luwian word Sura/i was translated to Phoenician ʔšr "Assyria."[1] For Herodotus
Herodotus
in the 5th century BC, Syria
Syria
extended as far north as the Halys river
Halys river
and as far south as Arabia and Egypt. For Pliny the Elder
Pliny the Elder
and Pomponius Mela, Syria
Syria
covered the entire Fertile Crescent
[...More...]

"Greater Syria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Iberian Peninsula
The Iberian Peninsula
Peninsula
/aɪˈbɪəriən pəˈnɪnsjʊlə/,[a] also known as Iberia /aɪˈbɪəriə/,[b] is located in the southwest corner of Europe. The peninsula is principally divided between Portugal
Portugal
and Spain, comprising most of their territory. It also includes Andorra, and a small part of France
France
along the peninsula's northeastern edge, as well as Gibraltar
Gibraltar
on its south coast, a small peninsula that forms an overseas territory of the United Kingdom
[...More...]

"Iberian Peninsula" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.