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Filter Feeder
Filter feeders are a sub-group of suspension feeding animals that feed by straining suspended matter and food particles from water, typically by passing the water over a specialized filtering structure. Some animals that use this method of feeding are clams, krill, sponges, baleen whales, and many fish (including some sharks). Some birds, such as flamingos and certain species of duck, are also filter feeders. Filter feeders can play an important role in clarifying water, and are therefore considered ecosystem engineers.Contents1 Fish 2 Crustaceans 3 Baleen
Baleen
whales 4 Bivalves 5 Sponges 6 Cnidarians 7 Flamingos 8 Pterosaurs 9 Marine reptiles 10 See also 11 Notes 12 References 13 External linksFish[edit] See also: Forage fish Most forage fish are filter feeders
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Phytoplankton
Phytoplankton
Phytoplankton
/ˌfaɪtoʊˈplæŋktən/ are the autotrophic (self-feeding) components of the plankton community and a key part of oceans, seas and freshwater basin ecosystems. The name comes from the Greek words φυτόν (phyton), meaning "plant", and πλαγκτός (planktos), meaning "wanderer" or "drifter".[1] Most phytoplankton are too small to be individually seen with the unaided eye
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Cetacea
Mysticeti Odontoceti †Archaeoceti (see text for families)DiversityAround 88 species Cetacea
Cetacea
(/sɪˈteɪʃə/) are a widely distributed and diverse clade of aquatic mammals that today consists of the whales, dolphins, and porpoises. Cetaceans are carnivorous and finned. Most species live in the sea, some in rivers. The name is derived from the Latin
Latin
cetus "whale", itself from the Greek κῆτος kētos "huge fish".[1] There are around 89 extant species, which are divided into two groups or parvorders, the Odontoceti
Odontoceti
or toothed whales, a group of more than 70 species that includes the dolphins and porpoises, and the Mysticeti or baleen whales, of which there are now 15 species
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Animal
Animals are multicellular eukaryotic organisms that form the biological kingdom Animalia. With few exceptions, animals consume organic material, breathe oxygen, are able to move, reproduce sexually, and grow from a hollow sphere of cells, the blastula, during embryonic development. Over 1.5 million living animal species have been described—of which around 1 million are insects—but it has been estimated there are over 7 million in total. Animals range in size from 8.5 millionths of a metre to 33.6 metres (110 ft) long and have complex interactions with each other and their environments, forming intricate food webs. The study of animals is called zoology. Aristotle divided animals into those with blood and those without. Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus
created the first hierarchical biological classification for animals in 1758 with his Systema Naturae, which Jean-Baptiste Lamarck expanded into 14 phyla by 1809
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Mysidacea
The Mysidacea
Mysidacea
is a group of shrimp-like crustaceans in the superorder Peracarida, comprising the two extant orders Mysida
Mysida
and Lophogastrida and the prehistoric Pygocephalomorpha. Current data indicate that despite their external similarities, the three orders are not closely related,[1] and the taxon Mysidacea
Mysidacea
is not used in modern taxonomy.[2][3][4][5] References[edit]^ K. Meland & E. Willassen (2007). "The disunity of "Mysidacea" (Crustacea)" (PDF). Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. 44 (3): 1083–1104. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2007.02.009. PMID 17398121.  ^ R. Brusca & G. Brusca (2003). Invertebrates. Sunderland, Massachusetts: Sinauer Associates.  ^ Gary Anderson (January 20, 2010). " Peracarida
Peracarida
Taxa and Literature (Cumacea, Lophogastrida, Mysida, Stygiomysida and Tanaidacea)". [permanent dead link] ^ J. Mees (2010)
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Cod
Cod
Cod
is the common name for the genus Gadus
Gadus
of demersal fishes, belonging to the family Gadidae.[1] Cod
Cod
is also used as part of the common name for a number of other fish species, and some species suggested to belong to genus Gadus
Gadus
are not called cod (the Alaska pollock). The two most common species of cod are the Atlantic cod
Atlantic cod
(Gadus morhua), which lives in the colder waters and deeper sea regions throughout the North Atlantic, and the Pacific cod
Pacific cod
(Gadus macrocephalus), found in both eastern and western regions of the northern Pacific. Gadus
Gadus
morhua was named by Linnaeus
Linnaeus
in 1758. (However, G
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Flounder
Flounders are a group of flatfish species. They are demersal fish, found at the bottom of oceans around the world; some species will also enter estuaries.Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Eye migration 3 Habitat 4 Threats 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksTaxonomy[edit] The name "flounder" is used for several only distantly related species, though all are in the suborder Pleuronectoidei
Pleuronectoidei
(families Achiropsettidae, Bothidae, Pleuronectidae, Paralichthyidae, and Samaria)
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Striped Bass
The striped bass ( Morone
Morone
saxatilis), also called Atlantic
Atlantic
striped bass, striper, linesider, rock or rockfish, is an anadromous Perciforme
Perciforme
fish of the family Moronidae
Moronidae
found primarily along the Atlantic
Atlantic
coast of North America. It has also been widely introduced into inland recreational fisheries across the United States. Striped bass found in the Gulf of Mexico
Mexico
are a separate strain referred to as Gulf Coast striped bass.[2] The striped bass is the state fish of Maryland, Rhode Island, and South Carolina, and the state saltwater (marine) fish of New York, New Jersey, Virginia, and New Hampshire. The history of the striped bass fishery in North America
North America
dates back to the Colonial period
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Thoracopod
The arthropod leg is a form of jointed appendage of arthropods, usually used for walking. Many of the terms used for arthropod leg segments (called podomeres) are of Latin origin, and may be confused with terms for bones: coxa (meaning hip, plural coxae), trochanter (compare trochanter), femur (plural femora), tibia (plural tibiae), tarsus (plural tarsi), ischium (plural ischia), metatarsus, carpus, dactylus (meaning finger), patella (plural patellae). Homologies of leg segments between groups are difficult to prove and are the source of much argument. Some authors posit up to eleven segments per leg for the most recent common ancestor of extant arthropods[1] but modern arthropods have eight or fewer
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Porcelain Crab
See textPorcelain crabs are decapod crustaceans in the widespread family Porcellanidae, which superficially resemble true crabs. They have flattened bodies as an adaptation for living in rock crevices. They are delicate, readily losing limbs when attacked, and use their large claws for maintaining territories.Contents1 Description 2 Evolution 3 Biogeography and ecology 4 Diversity 5 ReferencesDescription[edit] Porcelain crabs are small, usually with body widths of less than 15 mm (0.59 in).[1] They share the general body plan of a squat lobster, but their bodies are more compact and flattened, an adaptation for living and hiding under rocks.[2] Porcelain crabs are quite fragile animals, and will often shed their limbs to escape predators,[3] hence their name. The lost appendage can grow back over several moults
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Baleen
Baleen
Baleen
is a filter-feeder system inside the mouths of baleen whales. The baleen system works by a whale opening its mouth underwater and taking in water. The whale then pushes the water out, and animals such as krill are filtered by the baleen and remain as food source for the whale. Baleen
Baleen
is similar to bristles and consists of keratin, the same substance found in human fingernails and hair. Baleen
Baleen
is a skin derivative. Some whales, such as the bowhead whale, have longer baleen than others. Other whales, such as the gray whale, only use one side of their baleen. These baleen bristles are arranged in plates across the upper jaw of the whale. As a material for various human uses, baleen is usually called whalebone
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Plankton
Plankton
Plankton
(singular plankter) are the diverse collection of organisms that live in large bodies of water and are unable to swim against a current.[1] They provide a crucial source of food to many large aquatic organisms, such as fish and whales. These organisms include bacteria, archaea, algae, protozoa and drifting or floating animals that inhabit—for example—the pelagic zone of oceans, seas, or bodies of fresh water
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Toothed Whales
The toothed whales (systematic name Odontoceti) are a parvorder of cetaceans that includes dolphins, porpoises, and all other whales possessing teeth, such as the beaked whales and sperm whales. Seventy-three species of toothed whales (also called odontocetes) are described. They are one of two living groups of cetaceans, the other being the baleen whales (Mysticeti), which have baleen instead of teeth. The two groups are thought to have diverged around 34 million years ago (mya). Toothed whales range in size from the 4.5 ft (1.4 m) and 120 lb (54 kg) vaquita to the 20 m (66 ft) and 55 t (61-short-ton) sperm whale. Several species of odontocetes exhibit sexual dimorphism, in that the females are larger than males. They have streamlined bodies and two limbs that are modified into flippers. Some can travel at up to 20 knots. Odontocetes have conical teeth designed for catching fish or squid
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Right Whale
Right whales or black whales are three species of large baleen whales of the genus Eubalaena: the North Atlantic right whale (E. glacialis), the North Pacific right whale (E. japonica) and the Southern right whale (E. australis). They are classified in the family Balaenidae with the bowhead whale. Right whales have rotund bodies with arching rostrums, V-shaped blowholes and dark gray or black skin. The most distinguishing feature of a right whale are the rough patches of skin on its head which appear white due to parasitism by whale lice. Right whales can grow up to more than 18 m (59 ft) long with a highest-recorded length of 19.8 m (65 ft).[8] They weigh 100 short tons (91 t; 89 long tons) or more 20.7 m (68 ft) with 135,000 kg (298,000 lb)[9] or 21.3 m (70 ft) with uncertainty,[10] significantly larger than other coastal species such as humpbacks, grays, or edens and omura's, but smaller than blues
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Rorqual
Balaenoptera MegapteraRorquals /ˈrɔːrkwəl/ (Balaenopteridae) are the largest group of baleen whales, a family with nine extant species in two genera
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Blue Whale
The blue whale ( Balaenoptera
Balaenoptera
musculus) is a marine mammal belonging to the baleen whales (Mysticeti).[3] At up to 29.9 metres (98 ft)[4] in length and with a maximum recorded weight of 173 tonnes (190 short tons)[4] and probably reaching over 181 tonnes (200 short tons), it is the largest animal known to have ever existed.[5][6] Long and slender, the blue whale's body can be various shades of bluish-grey dorsally and somewhat lighter underneath.[7] There are at least three distinct subspecies: B. m. musculus of the North Atlantic and North Pacific, B. m. intermedia of the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
and B. m. brevicauda (also known as the pygmy blue whale) found in the Indian Ocean and South Pacific Ocean. B. m. indica, found in the Indian Ocean, may be another subspecies
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