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Ethnic Groups
An ethnic group, or an ethnicity, is a category of people who identify with each other based on similarities such as common ancestry, language, society, culture or nation.[1][2] Ethnicity is usually an inherited status based on the society in which one lives. Membership of an ethnic group tends to be defined by a shared cultural heritage, ancestry, origin myth, history, homeland, language or dialect, symbolic systems such as religion, mythology and ritual, cuisine, dressing style, art, and physical appearance. Ethnic groups, derived from the same historical founder population, often continue to speak related languages and share a similar gene pool
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Ethnicity (other)
Ethnicity
Ethnicity
is the common characteristics of a group of people. Ethnicity
Ethnicity
may also refer to: Ethnicity
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Cyborg Anthropology
Cyborg
Cyborg
anthropology is a discipline that studies the interaction between humanity and technology from an anthropological perspective. The discipline is relatively new, but offers novel insights on new technological advances and their effect on culture and society.Contents1 History 2 Methodology2.1 'Cyborg' Origins and Meaning 2.2 Digital vs
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Evolutionary Anthropology
Evolutionary anthropology
Evolutionary anthropology
is the interdisciplinary study of the evolution of human physiology and human behaviour and the relation between hominids and non-hominid primates. Evolutionary anthropology is based in natural science and social science
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Molecular Anthropology
Molecular
Molecular
anthropology is a field of anthropology in which molecular analysis is used to determine evolutionary links between ancient and modern human populations, as well as between contemporary species. Generally, comparisons are made between sequences, either DNA or protein sequences; however, early studies used comparative serology. By examining DNA sequences
DNA sequences
in different populations, scientists can determine the closeness of relationships between populations (or within populations). Certain similarities in genetic makeup let molecular anthropologists determine whether or not different groups of people belong to the same haplogroup, and thus if they share a common geographical origin
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Neuroanthropology
Neuroanthropology
Neuroanthropology
is the study of the relationship between culture and the brain.Contents1 Overview 2 See also 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksOverview[edit] Neuroanthropology
Neuroanthropology
explores how the brain gives rise to culture, how culture influences brain development, structure and function, and the pathways followed by the co-evolution of brain and culture.[1] Moreover, neuroanthropologists consider how new findings in the brain sciences help us understand the interactive effects of culture and biology on human development and behavior
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Nutritional Anthropology
Nutritional anthropology is the interplay between human biology, economic systems, nutritional status and food security, and how changes in the former affect the latter. If economic and environmental changes in a community affect access to food, food security, and dietary health, then this interplay between culture and biology is in turn connected to broader historical and economic trends associated with globalization
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Palaeoanthropology
Paleoanthropology
Paleoanthropology
or paleo-anthropology is a branch of archaeology with a human focus, which seeks to understand the early development of anatomically modern humans, a process known as hominization, through the reconstruction of evolutionary kinship lines within the family Hominidae, working from biological evidence (such as petrified skeletal remains, bone fragments, footprints) and cultural evidence (such as stone tools, artifacts, and settlement localities).[1][2] The field draws from and combines paleontology, biological anthropology, and cultural anthropology
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Primatology
Primatology
Primatology
is the scientific study of primates.[1] It is a diverse discipline at the boundary between mammalogy and anthropology, and researchers can be found in academic departments of anatomy, anthropology, biology, medicine, psychology, veterinary sciences and zoology, as well as in animal sanctuaries, biomedical research facilities, museums and zoos.[2] Primatologists study both living and extinct primates in their natural habitats and in laboratories by conducting field studies and experiments in order to understand aspects of their evolution and behaviour.Contents1 Sub-disciplines 2 Western primatology2
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Applied Anthropology
Applied anthropology refers to the application of the method and theory of anthropology to the analysis and solution of practical problems
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Anthropology Of Art
Anthropology
Anthropology
of art is a sub-field in social anthropology dedicated to the study of art in different cultural contexts
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Cognitive Anthropology
Cognitive anthropology is an approach within cultural anthropology in which scholars seek to explain patterns of shared knowledge, cultural innovation, and transmission over time and space using the methods and theories of the cognitive sciences (especially experimental psychology and evolutionary biology) often through close collaboration with historians, ethnographers, archaeologists, linguists, musicologists and other specialists engaged in the description and interpretation of cultural forms
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Anthropology Of Development
The anthropology of development is a term applied to a body of anthropological work which views development from a critical perspective. The kind of issues addressed, and implications for the approach typically adopted can be gleaned from a list questions posed by Gow (1996). These questions involve anthropologists asking why, if a key development goal is to alleviate poverty, is poverty increasing? Why is there such a gap between plans and outcomes? Why are those working in development so willing to disregard history and the lessons it might offer? Why is development so externally driven rather than having an internal basis? In short why does so much planned development fail? This anthropology of development has been distinguished from development anthropology.[1][2] Development anthropology refers to the application of anthropological perspectives to the multidisciplinary branch of development studies
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Ethnicities (journal)
Ethnicities is a peer-reviewed academic journal that publishes research in the fields of sociology and politics concerning questions of ethnicity, nationalism and related issues such as identity politics and minority rights. It was established in 2001 and is published bimonthly by SAGE Publications. The editors-in-chief are Stephen May (University of Auckland) and Tariq Modood (University of Bristol).Contents1 History 2 Abstracting and indexing 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Ethnicities was established in 2001, initially with three issues a year. The following year it moved to four issues and in 2012 to six issues
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Digital Anthropology
Digital anthropology is the anthropological study of the relationship between humans and digital-era technology. The field is new, and thus has a variety of names with a variety of emphases. These include techno-anthropology,[1] digital ethnography, cyberanthropology,[2] and virtual anthropology.[3]Contents1 Definition and scope 2 Methodology2.1 Digital fieldwork 2.2 Digital technology
Digital technology
as a tool of anthropology3 Ethics 4 University courses 5 Prominent figures 6 See also 7 References7.1 Notes 7.2 Bibliography8 External linksDefinition and scope[edit] Digital technology
Digital technology
uses binary codes of 0s and 1s to relay messages between machines. Most anthropologists who use the phrase "digital anthropology" are specifically referring to online and Internet technology
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Ecological Anthropology
Ecological anthropology
Ecological anthropology
is a sub-field of anthropology and is defined as the "study of cultural adaptations to environments".[1] The sub-field is also defined as, "the study of relationships between a population of humans and their biophysical environment".[2] The focus of its research concerns "how cultural beliefs and practices helped human populations adapt to their environments, and how people used elements of their culture to maintain their ecosystems".[1] Ecological anthropology developed from the approach of cultural ecology, and it provided a conceptual framework more s
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