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Emperor Shōkō
Emperor Shōkō
Emperor Shōkō
(称光天皇 Shōkō-tennō) (May 12, 1401 – August 30, 1428) was the 101st emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.[1] His reign spanned the years from 1412 through 1428.[2]Contents1 Genealogy1.1 Issue2 Events of Shōkō's life2.1 Kugyō3 Eras of Shōkō's reign 4 Notes 5 References 6 See alsoGenealogy[edit] His personal name was Mihito (initially written as 躬仁, and later written as 実仁). He was the eldest son of Emperor Go-Komatsu. His mother was Hinonishi Motoko (日野西資子), daughter of Hino Sukekuni (日野資国)
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Fushimi-ku, Kyoto
Fushimi (伏見区, Fushimi-ku) is one of the eleven wards in the city of Kyoto, in Kyoto
Kyoto
Prefecture, Japan. Famous places in Fushimi include the Fushimi Inari
Fushimi Inari
Shrine, with thousands of torii lining the paths up and down a mountain; Fushimi Castle, originally built by Toyotomi Hideyoshi, with its rebuilt towers and gold-lined tea-room; and the Teradaya, an inn at which Sakamoto Ryōma
Sakamoto Ryōma
was attacked and injured about a year before his assassination. Also of note is the Gokōgu shrine, which houses a stone used in the construction of Fushimi Castle
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Udaijin
Minister of the Right[1] (右大臣, Udaijin) was a government position in Japan
Japan
in the late Nara and Heian periods. The position was consolidated in the Taihō Code
Taihō Code
of 702. The Asuka Kiyomihara Code of 689 marks the initial appearance of the udaijin in the context of a central administrative body called the Daijō-kan
Daijō-kan
(Council of State). This early Daijō-kan
Daijō-kan
was composed of the three ministers—the daijō-daijin (Chancellor), the sadaijin (Minister of the Left) and the udaijin.[2] The udaijin was the Junior Minister of State, overseeing all branches of the Daijō-kan. He would be the deputy of the sadaijin.[3] The post of udaijin, along with the rest of the Daijō-kan
Daijō-kan
structure, gradually lost power over the 10th and 11th centuries, as the Fujiwara came to dominate politics more and more
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Ashikaga Yoshikatsu
Ashikaga Yoshikatsu
Ashikaga Yoshikatsu
(足利 義勝, March 19, 1434 – August 16, 1443) was the 7th shōgun of the Ashikaga shogunate
Ashikaga shogunate
who reigned from 1442 to 1443 during the Muromachi period
Muromachi period
of Japan
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Nihon Ōdai Ichiran
Nihon Ōdai Ichiran
Nihon Ōdai Ichiran
(日本王代一覧, Nihon ōdai ichiran), The Table of the Rulers of Japan, is a 17th-century chronicle of the serial reigns of Japanese emperors with brief notes about some of the noteworthy events or other happenings.[1] According to the 1871 edition of the American Cyclopaedia, the French translation of Nihon Ōdai Ichiran<
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Chrysanthemum Throne
The Chrysanthemum Throne
Throne
(皇位, kōi, lit. "Imperial seat") is the term used to identify the throne of the Emperor
Emperor
of Japan
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Nihon Odai Ichiran
Nihon Ōdai Ichiran
Nihon Ōdai Ichiran
(日本王代一覧, Nihon ōdai ichiran), The Table of the Rulers of Japan, is a 17th-century chronicle of the serial reigns of Japanese emperors with brief notes about some of the noteworthy events or other happenings.[1] According to the 1871 edition of the American Cyclopaedia, the French translation of Nihon Ōdai Ichiran<
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Meiji Period
The Meiji period
Meiji period
(明治時代, Meiji-jidai), also known as the Meiji era, is a Japanese era which extended from October 23, 1868, to July 30, 1912.[1] This period represents the first half of the Empire of Japan
Japan
during which Japanese society moved from being an isolated feudal society to its modern form. Fundamental changes affected its social structure, internal politics, economy, military, and foreign relations. The period corresponded to the reign of Emperor Meiji
Emperor Meiji
after 1868, and lasted until his death in 1912
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Daijō-kan
The Daijō-kan
Daijō-kan
or Dajō-kan (Japanese: 太政官),[1] also known as the Great Council of State, was (i) (Daijō-kan) the highest organ of Japan's premodern Imperial government under Ritsuryō
Ritsuryō
legal system during and after the Nara period
Nara period
or (ii) (Dajō-kan) the highest organ of Japan's government briefly restored to power after the Meiji Restoration, which was replaced by the Cabinet. It was consolidated in the Taihō Code
Taihō Code
of 702. The Asuka Kiyomihara Code of 689 marks the initial appearance of this central administrative body composed of the three ministers—the Daijō-daijin
Daijō-daijin
(Chancellor), the Sadaijin
Sadaijin
(Minister of the Left) and the Udaijin
Udaijin
(Minister of the Right).[2] The Imperial governing structure was headed by the Daijō-kan
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Sadaijin
The Minister of the Left
Minister of the Left
(左大臣, Sadaijin, [1]) was a government position in Japan
Japan
in the late Nara and Heian periods. The position was consolidated in the Taihō Code
Taihō Code
of 702. The Asuka Kiyomihara Code of 689 marks the initial appearance of the sadaijin in the context of a central administrative body called the Daijō-kan[1] (Council of State). This early Daijō-kan
Daijō-kan
was composed of the three ministers—the daijō-daijin (Chancellor), the sadaijin and the udaijin (Minister of the Right).[2] The sadaijin was the Senior Minister of State, overseeing all functions of government with the udaijin as his deputy.[3] Within the Daijō-kan, the sadaijin was second only to the daijō-daijin (the Great Minister, or Chancellor of the Realm) in power and influence
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Nadaijin
The Naidaijin
Naidaijin
(内大臣, Naidaijin, also pronounced uchi no otodo), literally meaning "Inner Minister", was an ancient office in the Japanese Imperial Court. Its role, rank and authority varied throughout the pre- Meiji period
Meiji period
of Japanese history, but in general remained as a significant post under the Taihō Code.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Pre-Meiji period 1.2 Meiji period
Meiji period
and after2 See also 3 Notes 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Pre-Meiji period[edit] The office of Naidaijin
Naidaijin
predated the Taihō Code
Taihō Code
of 701. Fujiwara no Kamatari was the first person appointed to the post in 669
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Korea
Korea
Korea
(/kəˈriːə/) is a historical region in East Asia; since 1945, it has been divided into two distinct sovereign states: North Korea (officially the "Democratic People's Republic of Korea") and South Korea
Korea
(officially the "Republic of Korea"). Located on the Korean Peninsula, Korea
Korea
is bordered by China
China
to the northwest and Russia
Russia
to the northeast. It is separated from Japan
Japan
to the east by the Korea Strait and the Sea of Japan
Japan
(East Sea). Korea
Korea
emerged as a singular political entity in 676 AD, after centuries of conflict among the Three Kingdoms of Korea, which were unified as Unified Silla
Unified Silla
to the south and Balhae
Balhae
to the north
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Dainagon
Dainagon
Dainagon
(大納言) was a counselor of the first rank in the Imperial court of Japan.[1] The role dates from the 7th century. This advisory position remained a part of the Imperial court from the 8th century until the Meiji period
Meiji period
in the 19th century.[2] The post was created in 702 by the Taihō Code, and evolved out of the earlier post Oimonomōsu-tsukasa. Holders of the office were of the Senior Third Rank. They assisted the Minister of the Left (the Sadaijin) and the Minister of the Right (the Udaijin).[3] By the mid-17th century, the Dainagon
Dainagon
counselor or state, was expected to work closely the Minister of the Center (the Naidaijin), whose position ranked just below the Udaijin
Udaijin
and the Sadaijin
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Japanese Era Names
The Japanese era name (年号, nengō, "year name"), also known as gengō (元号), is the first of the two elements that identify years in the Japanese era calendar scheme. The second element, a number, counts the years since the era began; as in many other systems, there is no year zero. For example, the first year of the Heisei period
Heisei period
was 1989 CE, or " Heisei
Heisei
1", so the year 2018 CE in this scheme is "Heisei 30". As elsewhere in East Asia, the use of nengō was originally derived from Chinese Imperial practice, although the Japanese system is independent of the Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese era-naming systems. Unlike some of these other similar systems, Japanese era names are still in use
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Nengō
The Japanese era name (年号, nengō, "year name"), also known as gengō (元号), is the first of the two elements that identify years in the Japanese era calendar scheme. The second element, a number, counts the years since the era began; as in many other systems, there is no year zero. For example, the first year of the Heisei period
Heisei period
was 1989 CE, or " Heisei
Heisei
1", so the year 2018 CE in this scheme is "Heisei 30". As elsewhere in East Asia, the use of nengō was originally derived from Chinese Imperial practice, although the Japanese system is independent of the Chinese, Korean, and Vietnamese era-naming systems. Unlike some of these other similar systems, Japanese era names are still in use
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OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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