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Driving Wheel
On a steam locomotive, a driving wheel is a powered wheel which is driven by the locomotive's pistons (or turbine, in the case of a steam turbine locomotive).[1] On a conventional, non-articulated locomotive, the driving wheels are all coupled together with side rods (also known as coupling rods); normally one pair is directly driven by the main rod (or connecting rod) which is connected to the end of the piston rod; power is transmitted to the others through the side rods.[2][3][4] On diesel and electric locomotives, the driving wheels may be directly driven by the traction motors. Coupling rods are not usually used, and it is quite common for each axle to have its own motor. Jackshaft drive and coupling rods were used in the past[5][6] (e.g
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Nirvana (band)
Nirvana was an American rock band formed by singer and guitarist Kurt Cobain and bassist Krist Novoselic
Krist Novoselic
in Aberdeen, Washington, in 1987. Nirvana went through a succession of drummers, the longest-lasting being Dave Grohl, who joined in 1990. Despite releasing only three full-length studio albums in their seven-year career, Nirvana has come to be regarded as one of the most influential and important alternative bands in history. Though the band dissolved in 1994 after the death of Cobain, their music maintains a popular following and continues to influence modern rock and roll culture. In the late 1980s, Nirvana established itself as part of the Seattle grunge scene, releasing its first album, Bleach, for the independent record label Sub Pop
Sub Pop
in 1989. They developed a sound that relied on dynamic contrasts, often between quiet verses and loud, heavy choruses
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Tom Rush
Tom Rush
Tom Rush
(born February 8, 1941) is an American folk and blues singer, songwriter, musician and recording artist.[1]Contents1 Life and career 2 Discography 3 References 4 External linksLife and career[edit] Rush was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, the son of a teacher at St. Paul's School, in Concord, New Hampshire. Tom began performing in 1961 while studying at Harvard University
Harvard University
after having graduated from the Groton School. He majored in English literature. Many of his early recordings are versions of Lowland Scots and Appalachian folk songs. He regularly performed at the Club 47
Club 47
coffeehouse (now called Club Passim) in Cambridge, the Unicorn in Boston, and The Main Point in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. Rush is credited by Rolling Stone magazine with ushering in the era of the singer-songwriter
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UIC Classification
UIC may refer to: Education[edit]Underwood International College, a department of Yonsei University, South Korea Unilatina International College, a college in Florida, United States United International College, a liberal arts college in China University of Illinois at Chicago, a public four-year university in Chicago, Illinois, United States UIC Flames, the intercollegiate athletic program of the University of Illinois at ChicagoGovernment[edit]Uganda Insurance Commission, a government agency Unit Identification Code, an alphanumeric code used by the United States Department of DefenseOrganisations[edit]
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Sprocket
A sprocket[1] or sprocket-wheel[2] is a profiled wheel with teeth, or cogs,[3][4] that mesh with a chain, track or other perforated or indented material.[5][6] The name 'sprocket' applies generally to any wheel upon which radial projections engage a chain passing over it. It is distinguished from a gear in that sprockets are never meshed together directly, and differs from a pulley in that sprockets have teeth and pulleys are smooth. Sprockets are used in bicycles, motorcycles, cars, tracked vehicles, and other machinery either to transmit rotary motion between two shafts where gears are unsuitable or to impart linear motion to a track, tape etc. Perhaps the most common form of sprocket may be found in the bicycle, in which the pedal shaft carries a large sprocket-wheel, which drives a chain, which, in turn, drives a small sprocket on the axle of the rear wheel
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Caterpillar Track
Continuous track, also called tank tread[1] or caterpillar track, is a system of vehicle propulsion in which a continuous band of treads or track plates is driven by two or more wheels. This band is typically made of modular steel plates in the case of military vehicles and heavy equipment, or synthetic rubber reinforced with steel wires in the case of lighter agricultural or construction vehicles. The large surface area of the tracks distributes the weight of the vehicle better than steel or rubber tires on an equivalent vehicle, enabling a continuous tracked vehicle to traverse soft ground with less likelihood of becoming stuck due to sinking. The prominent treads of the metal plates are both hard-wearing and damage resistant, especially in comparison to rubber tires
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Tank
A tank is an armoured fighting vehicle designed for front-line combat, with heavy firepower, strong armour, tracks and a powerful engine providing good battlefield maneuverability. The first tanks were designed to overcome the deadlock of trench warfare; in the 2010s, they are a mainstay of modern ground forces and a key part of combined arms combat. Modern tanks are versatile mobile land weapon system platforms, mounting a large-calibre cannon in a rotating gun turret, supplemented by mounted machine guns or other weapons
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Bulldozer
A bulldozer is a crawler (continuous tracked tractor) equipped with a substantial metal plate (known as a blade) used to push large quantities of soil, sand, rubble, or other such material during construction or conversion work and typically equipped at the rear with a claw-like device (known as a ripper) to loosen densely compacted materials. Bulldozers can be found on a wide range of sites, mines and quarries, military bases, heavy industry factories, engineering projects and farms. The term "bulldozer" correctly refers only to a tractor (usually tracked) fitted with a dozer blade.Contents1 Description1.1 Blade 1.2 Ripper2 Modifications2.1 Armored bulldozers3 History 4 Manufacturers 5 History of the word 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDescription[edit]A Caterpillar D10N bulldozer equipped with a single shank ripper.Most often bulldozers are large and powerful tracked heavy equipment. The tracks give them excellen
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The Byrds
The Byrds
The Byrds
/bɜːrdz/ were an American rock band, formed in Los Angeles, California
California
in 1964.[1] The band underwent multiple lineup changes throughout its existence, with frontman
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The Black Crowes
The Black Crowes
The Black Crowes
were an American rock band formed in 1989. Their discography includes eight studio albums, four live albums and several charting singles. The band was signed to Def American Recordings in 1989 by producer George Drakoulias and released its debut album, Shake Your Money Maker, the following year. The follow-up, The Southern Harmony and Musical Companion, reached the top of the Billboard 200
Billboard 200
in 1992. After a hiatus between 2002 and 2005, the band regrouped and toured for several years before releasing Warpaint in 2008, which hit number 5 on the Billboard chart.[1] After the release of a greatest hits/acoustic double album Croweology
Croweology
in August 2010, the band started a 20th anniversary tour that was followed by a second hiatus
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Flange
A flange is an external or internal ridge, or rim (lip), for strength, as the flange of an iron beam such as an I-beam
I-beam
or a T-beam; or for attachment to another object, as the flange on the end of a pipe, steam cylinder, etc., or on the lens mount of a camera; or for a flange of a rail car or tram wheel. Thus flanged wheels are wheels with a flange on one side to keep the wheels from running off the rails. The term "flange" is also used for a kind of tool used to form flanges
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Cowboy Junkies
Cowboy Junkies
Cowboy Junkies
are a Canadian alternative country, blues and folk rock band. The group was formed in Toronto
Toronto
in 1985 by Margo Timmins (vocalist), Michael Timmins
Timmins
(songwriter, guitarist), Peter Timmins (drummer) and Alan Anton (bassist).[1] The Junkies first performed publicly at the Beverley Tavern and other clubs in Toronto's Queen Street West, including The Rivoli. Their 1986 debut album, produced by Canadian producer Peter Moore, was the blues-inspired Whites Off Earth Now!!, recorded using an ambisonic microphone in the family garage.[1] The group's fame spread with their second album, The Trinity Session, recorded in 1987 at Toronto's Church of the Holy Trinity. Their sound, again using the ambisonic microphone, and their mix of blues, country, folk, rock and jazz earned them both critical attention and a cult following
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David Wiffen
David Wiffen (born 11 March 1942, in Redhill, Surrey, England) is a folk music singer-songwriter. Two of his songs, "Driving Wheel" and "More Often Than Not", have become cover standards.Contents1 Career 2 Discography 3 Covers 4 References 5 External linksCareer[edit] David Wiffen was born in Redhill, Surrey, in 1942. He spent his early childhood with his mother,living on an aunt's farm in Chipstead, while his father, an engineer, contributed to the war effort. Following the war, Wiffen's family relocated to London and, in 1954, to Claygate, Surrey, where Wiffen attended Hinchley Wood School.[1] Wiffen first sang with the Kingston upon Thames-based Black Cat Skiffle
Skiffle
group.[1] Wiffen moved with his family to Canada at age 16, and became part of the burgeoning folk music scene, initially in Toronto
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Blind Willie McTell
Blind Willie McTell
Blind Willie McTell
(born William Samuel McTier; May 5, 1898 – August 19, 1959) was a Piedmont blues
Piedmont blues
and ragtime singer and guitarist. He played with a fluid, syncopated fingerstyle guitar technique, common among many exponents of Piedmont blues. Unlike his contemporaries, he came to use twelve-string guitars exclusively. McTell was also an adept slide guitarist, unusual among ragtime bluesmen. His vocal style, a smooth and often laid-back tenor, differed greatly from many of the harsher voices of Delta bluesmen such as Charley Patton. McTell performed in various musical styles, including blues, ragtime, religious music and hokum. McTell was born in Thomson, Georgia. He learned to play the guitar in his early teens. He soon became a street performer in several Georgia cities, including Atlanta
Atlanta
and Augusta, and first recorded in 1927 for Victor Records
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Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan
(/ˈdɪlən/; born Robert Allen Zimmerman, May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, author, and painter, who has been an influential figure in popular music and culture for more than five decades. Much of his most celebrated work dates from the 1960s, when he became a reluctant "voice of a generation"[2] with songs such as "Blowin' in the Wind" and "The Times They Are a-Changin'" that became anthems for the Civil Rights Movement
Civil Rights Movement
and anti-war movement. In 1965, he controversially abandoned his early fan-base in the American folk music revival, recording a six-minute single, "Like a Rolling Stone", which enlarged the scope of popular music. Dylan's lyrics incorporate a wide range of political, social, philosophical, and literary influences. They defied existing pop-music conventions and appealed to the burgeoning counterculture
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Johnny Winter
John Dawson Winter III
John Dawson Winter III
(February 23, 1944 – July 16, 2014), known as Johnny Winter, was an American musician, singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and producer. Best known for his high-energy blues-rock albums and live performances in the late 1960s and 1970s, Winter also produced three Grammy Award-winning albums for blues singer and guitarist Muddy Waters. After his time with Waters, Winter recorded several Grammy-nominated blues albums
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