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Drôme
Drôme
Drôme
(French pronunciation: ​[dʁom]; Droma in Occitan, Drôma in Arpitan) is a department in southeastern France
France
named after the Drôme
Drôme
River.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Climate 4 Economy4.1 Statistics 4.2 Tourism 4.3 Main companies5 Politics 6 Demographics6.1 Main cities7 Tourism 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] St Vallier in Drôme, was the birthplace of one of France's most famous courtesans, the noble-born Diane de Poitiers
Diane de Poitiers
(1499-1566), long-term mistress of King Henri II (1519-1559). The French National Constituent Assembly set up Drôme
Drôme
as one of the original 83 departments of France
France
on March 4, 1790, during the French Revolution
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Drome (novel)
Drome is a fantasy novel, written and illustrated by John Martin Leahy. It was first published in book form in 1952 by Fantasy Publishing Company, Inc. in an edition of 1,000 copies. The novel was originally serialized in the magazine Weird Tales
Weird Tales
in five parts beginning January 1927. Plot introduction[edit] Two explorers travel miles beneath Mount Rainier
Mount Rainier
and discover a cavernous realm, filled with glowing mist, called Drome, which is home to a lost civilization and fantastic animals, including bat-apes, snake-cats, and tree-octopuses. Reception[edit] P. Schuyler Miller
P. Schuyler Miller
described the story as quaint by modern standards, but praised "its classical quotations, bolstering allusions to dubious science, and real warmth and humor."[1] Everett F
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National Constituent Assembly (France)
Constituent or constituency may refer to:Contents1 In politics 2 In the physical sciences 3 Other meanings 4 See alsoIn politics[edit] Electoral district
Electoral district
or constituency Constituent (politics), an individual voter within an electoral district (constituency) Interest group
Interest group
or constituency Constituent assembly Entity forming part of a sovereign state: Constituent state Constituent countryConstituency (administrative division), in Namibia and the Canton of St
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Central European Summer Time
Central European Summer Time
European Summer Time
(CEST), sometime referred also as Central European Daylight Time (CEDT), is the standard clock time observed during the period of summer daylight-saving in those European countries which observe Central European Time
Central European Time
(UTC+1) during the other part of the year. It corresponds to UTC+2, which makes it the same as Central Africa Time, South African Standard Time
South African Standard Time
and Kaliningrad Time in Russia.Contents1 Names 2 Period of observation 3 Usage 4 See also 5 ReferencesNames[edit] Other names which have been applied to Central European Summer Time are Middle European Summer Time
European Summer Time
(MEST), Central European Daylight Saving Time (CEDT), and Bravo Time (after the second letter of the NATO phonetic alphabet)
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Daylight Saving Time
Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
(abbreviated DST), sometimes referred to as daylight savings time in US, Canadian and Australian speech,[1][2] and known as British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(BST) in the UK and just summer time in some countries, is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn to standard time.[3] George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[4] The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation, starting on April 30, 1916
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UTC+1
UTC+01:00, known simply as UTC+1, is a time offset that adds 1 hour to Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). This time is used in:Central European Time West Africa Time Western European Summer TimeBritish Summer Time Irish Standard TimeRomance Standard Time (Microsoft Windows Control panel) Swatch Internet Time EVE OnlineIn ISO 8601 the
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Central European Time
Central European Time
Central European Time
(CET), used in most parts of Europe
Europe
and a few North African
North African
countries, is a standard time which is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). The time offset from UTC
UTC
can be written as +01:00
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Time Zone
A time zone is a region of the globe that observes a uniform standard time for legal, commercial, and social purposes. Time
Time
zones tend to follow the boundaries of countries and their subdivisions because it is convenient for areas in close commercial or other communication to keep the same time. Most of the time zones on land are offset from Coordinated Universal Time
Time
(UTC) by a whole number of hours ( UTC−12
UTC−12
to UTC+14), but a few zones are offset by 30 or 45 minutes (e.g. Newfoundland Standard Time is UTC−03:30, Nepal
Nepal
Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:45, and Indian Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:30). Some higher latitude and temperate zone countries use daylight saving time for part of the year, typically by adjusting local clock time by an hour
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Estuary
An estuary is a partially enclosed coastal body of brackish water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea.[1] Estuaries form a transition zone between river environments and maritime environments. They are subject both to marine influences—such as tides, waves, and the influx of saline water—and to riverine influences—such as flows of fresh water and sediment. The mixing of sea water and fresh water provide high levels of nutrients both in the water column and in sediment, making estuaries among the most productive natural habitats in the world.[2] Most existing estuaries formed during the Holocene
Holocene
epoch with the flooding of river-eroded or glacially scoured valleys when the sea level began to rise about 10,000–12,000 years ago.[3] Estuaries are typically classified according to their geomorphological features or to water-circulation patterns
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The Republicans (france)
The Republicans (French: Les Républicains; LR) is a centre-right political party in France. The party was formed on 30 May 2015 by renaming the Union for a Popular Movement (UMP) party, which had been founded in 2002 under the leadership of former President of France
France
Jacques Chirac.[15][16] The party used to be one of the two major political parties in the French Fifth Republic along with the centre-left Socialist Party (PS)
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Occitan
Occitan
Occitan
(English: /ˈɒksɪtən, -tæn, -tɑːn/;[8][9] Occitan: [utsiˈta];[10] French: [ɔksitɑ̃]), also known as lenga d'òc (Occitan: [ˈleŋɡɔ ˈðɔ(k)] ( listen); French: langue d'oc) by its native speakers, is a Romance language. It is spoken in southern France, Italy's Occitan
Occitan
Valleys, Monaco, and Spain's Val d'Aran; collectively, these regions are sometimes referred to as Occitania. Occitan
Occitan
is also spoken in the linguistic enclave of Guardia Piemontese
Guardia Piemontese
(Calabria, Italy). However, there is controversy about the unity of the language, as some think that Occitan
Occitan
is a macrolanguage
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Henry II Of France
Henry II (French: Henri II; 31 March 1519 – 10 July 1559) was a monarch of the House of Valois
House of Valois
who ruled as King of France
King of France
from 31 March 1547 until his death in 1559. The second son of Francis I, he became Dauphin of France
Dauphin of France
upon the death of his elder brother Francis III, Duke of Brittany, in 1536. As a child, Henry and his elder brother spent over four years in captivity in Spain
Spain
as hostages in exchange for their father. Henry pursued his father's policies in matter of arts, wars and religion
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French Revolution
The French Revolution
Revolution
(French: Révolution française [ʁevɔlysjɔ̃ fʁɑ̃sɛːz]) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France
France
and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799. It was partially carried forward by Napoleon
Napoleon
during the later expansion of the French Empire. The Revolution
Revolution
overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon
Napoleon
who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond
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Arrondissements Of France
(including overseas)Departments (including overseas)ArrondissementsCantonsIntercommunality Métropole Communauté urbaine Communauté d'agglomération Communauté de communesCommunes Associated communes Municipal arrondissementsOthers in Overseas France Overseas collectivities Sui generis collectivity Overseas country Overseas territory Clipperton IslandAn arrondissement (French pronunciation: ​[aʁɔ̃dismɑ̃])[1] is a level of administrative division in France. As of 2016[update], the 101 French departments were divided into 334 arrondissements (including 12 overseas).[2] The capital of an arrondissement is called a subprefecture
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Subprefectures In France
In France, a subprefecture (French: sous-préfecture) is the administrative center of a departmental arrondissement that does not contain the prefecture for its department. The term also applies to the building that houses the administrative headquarters for an arrondissement. The civil servant in charge of a subprefecture is the subprefect, assisted by a general secretary
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Province Of France
A province is almost always an administrative division, within a country or state. The term derives from the ancient Roman provincia, which was the major territorial and administrative unit of the Roman Empire's territorial possessions outside Italy. The term province has since been adopted by many countries, and in those with no actual provinces, it has come to mean "outside the capital city". While some provinces were produced artificially by colonial powers, others were formed around local groups with their own ethnic identities. Many have their own powers independent of federal authority, especially in Canada
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