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Demonym
A DEMONYM (/ˈdɛmənɪm/ ; δῆμος dẽmos "people, tribe", ὄόνομα ónoma "name") is a word that identifies residents or natives of a particular place, which is derived from the name of that particular place. It is a neologism (i.e., a recently minted term); previously GENTILIC was recorded in English dictionaries, e.g., the Oxford
Oxford
English Dictionary and Chambers Twentieth Century Dictionary. Examples of demonyms include a Swahili for a person of the Swahili coast , the colloquial Kiwi for a person from New Zealand
New Zealand
, and a Cochabambino for a person from the city of Cochabamba
Cochabamba
. Demonyms do not always clearly distinguish place of origin or ethnicity from place of residence or citizenship, and many demonyms overlap with the ethnonym for the ethnically dominant group of a region
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The Chicago Manual Of Style
THE CHICAGO MANUAL OF STYLE (abbreviated in writing as CMS or CMOS , or, by some writers as CHICAGO) is a style guide for American English published since 1906 by the University of Chicago Press . Its sixteen editions have prescribed writing and citation styles widely used in publishing. It is "one of the most widely used and respected style guides in the United States". CMOS deals with aspects of editorial practice, from American English
American English
grammar and use to document preparation. CONTENTS * 1 Availability and usage * 2 Citation
Citation
styles * 2.1 Author-date style * 2.2 Notes and bibliography style * 3 History * 3.1 History of editions * 4 Recent printed editions * 5 See also * 6 Notes * 7 References * 8 External links AVAILABILITY AND USAGEThe Chicago
Chicago
Manual of Style is published in hardcover and online
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Citizen
CITIZENSHIP is the status of a person recognized under the custom or law as being a legal member of a sovereign state or part of a nation . A person may have multiple citizenships and a person who does not have citizenship of any state is said to be stateless . NATIONALITY is often used as a synonym for citizenship in English – notably in international law – although the term is sometimes understood as denoting a person's membership of a nation (a large ethnic group ). In some countries, e.g. the United States , the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
, nationality and citizenship can have different meanings (for more information, see Nationality versus citizenship )
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Paul Dickson
PAUL DICKSON (born 1939 in Yonkers, New York
Yonkers, New York
) is a freelance writer of more than 65 non-fiction books, mostly on American English
American English
language and popular culture. He has written many articles on a wide variety of subjects, including baseball and the military. PAUL DICKSON Dickson in 2009. BORN Yonkers, New York
Yonkers, New York
OCCUPATION author SUBJECT baseball, U.S. Military, word origins and slang NOTABLE WORKS The Bonus Army, Labels for Locals, War Slang WEBSITE http://www.pauldicksonbooks.com/He is a founding member and former president of Washington Independent Writers and a member of the National Press Club . Dickson coined the term "word word "
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Neologism
A NEOLOGISM (/niːˈɒlədʒɪzəm/ ; from Greek νέο- néo-, "new" and λόγος lógos, "speech, utterance") is a relatively recent or isolated term, word, or phrase that may be in the process of entering common use, but that has not yet been fully accepted into mainstream language. Neologisms are often directly attributable to a specific person, publication, period, or event. In the process of language formation, neologisms are more mature than protologisms . CONTENTS * 1 Background * 2 Sources * 3 History and meaning * 4 Literature * 5 Popular culture * 6 Translations * 7 Other uses * 8 See also * 9 References * 10 External links BACKGROUNDNeologisms are often created by combining existing words (see compound noun and adjective ) or by giving words new and unique suffixes or prefixes . Portmanteaux are combined words that are sometimes used commonly. "Brunch" is an example of a portmanteau word (breakfast + lunch)
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National Geographic (magazine)
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC, formerly the NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC MAGAZINE, is the official magazine of the National Geographic Society
National Geographic Society
. It has been published continuously since its first issue in 1888, nine months after the Society itself was founded. It primarily contains articles about science, geography, history, and world culture. The magazine is known for its thick square-bound glossy format with a yellow rectangular border and its extensive use of dramatic photographs. Controlling interest in the magazine has been held by 21st Century Fox since 2015. The magazine is published monthly, and additional map supplements are also included with subscriptions. It is available in a traditional printed edition and through an interactive online edition. On occasion, special editions of the magazine are issued
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Deme
In Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
, a DEME or DEMOS (Greek : δῆμος) was a suburb of Athens or a subdivision of Attica
Attica
, the region of Greece surrounding Athens . Demes as simple subdivisions of land in the countryside seem to have existed in the 6th century BC and earlier, but did not acquire particular significance until the reforms of Cleisthenes
Cleisthenes
in 508 BC. In those reforms, enrollment in the citizen-lists of a deme became the requirement for citizenship; prior to that time, citizenship had been based on membership in a phratry , or family group. At this same time, demes were established in the city of Athens itself, where they had not previously existed; in all, at the end of Cleisthenes' reforms, Attica
Attica
was divided into 139 demes to which one should add Berenikidai, established in 224/223 BC, Apollonieis (201/200 BC) and Antinoeis (126/127)
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English Language
ENGLISH is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now the third most widespread native language in the world, after Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
and Spanish , as well as the most widely spoken Germanic language . Named after the Angles
Angles
, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to Great Britain
Great Britain
, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea
Baltic Sea
. It is closely related to the other West Germanic languages
Germanic languages
of Frisian , Low German/Low Saxon , German , Dutch , and Afrikaans
Afrikaans
. The English vocabulary has been significantly influenced by French (a Romance language ), Norse (a North Germanic language ), and by Latin
Latin

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Celtic Languages
Pontic Steppe * Domestication of the horse * Kurgan * Kurgan culture * Steppe cultures * Bug-Dniester * Sredny Stog * Dnieper-Donets * Samara * Khvalynsk * Yamna * Mikhaylovka culture Caucasus * Maykop East-Asia * Afanasevo Eastern Europe * Usatovo * Cernavodă * Cucuteni Northern Europe* Corded ware * Bad
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Germanic Languages
Pontic Steppe * Domestication of the horse * Kurgan * Kurgan culture * Steppe cultures * Bug-Dniester * Sredny Stog * Dnieper-Donets * Samara * Khvalynsk * Yamna * Mikhaylovka culture Caucasus * Maykop East-Asia * Afanasevo Eastern Europe * Usatovo * Cernavodă * Cucuteni Northern Europe* Corded ware * Bad
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Semitic Languages
The SEMITIC LANGUAGES are a branch of the Afroasiatic language family originating in the Middle East . Semitic languages are spoken by more than 330 million people across much of Western Asia , North Africa and the Horn of Africa , as well as in often large expatriate communities in North America and Europe , with smaller communities in the Caucasus and Central Asia . The terminology was first used in the 1780s by members of the Göttingen School of History , who derived the name from Shem , one of the three sons of Noah in the Book of Genesis
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Late Latin
LATE LATIN is the scholarly name for the written Latin
Latin
of Late Antiquity . The English dictionary definition of Late Latin
Latin
dates this period from the 3rd to the 6th centuries AD, extending in the Iberian Peninsula of southwestern Europe to the 7th century. This somewhat-ambiguously-defined period fits between Classical Latin
Latin
and Medieval Latin
Medieval Latin
. There is no scholarly consensus about exactly when Classical Latin
Latin
should end or exactly when Medieval Latin
Medieval Latin
should begin. However, Late Latin
Latin
is characterized (with variations and disputes) by an identifiable style. Being a written language, Late Latin
Latin
is not identical with Vulgar Latin
Latin

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Affix
An AFFIX (in modern sense) is a morpheme that is attached to a word stem to form a new word or word form. Affixes may be derivational , like English -ness and pre-, or inflectional , like English plural -s and past tense -ed. They are bound morphemes by definition; prefixes and suffixes may be separable affixes . Affixations, the linguistic process speakers use form different words by adding morphemes (affixes) at the beginning (prefixation), the middle (infixation) or the end (suffixation) of words. CONTENTS * 1 Positional categories of affixes * 2 Lexical affixes * 3 Orthographic affixes * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 Bibliography * 7 External links POSITIONAL CATEGORIES OF AFFIXESAffixes are divided into many categories, depending on their position with reference to the stem. Prefix and suffix are extremely common terms. Infix and circumfix are less so, as they are not important in European languages. The other terms are uncommon
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Greek Language
GREEK ( Modern Greek : ελληνικά , elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα ( listen ), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean . It has the longest documented history of any living Indo-European language, spanning 34 centuries of written records. Its writing system has been the Greek alphabet for the major part of its history; other systems, such as Linear B and the Cypriot syllabary , were used previously. The alphabet arose from the Phoenician script and was in turn the basis of the Latin
Latin
, Cyrillic
Cyrillic
, Armenian , Coptic , Gothic and many other writing systems
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Merriam-Webster
MERRIAM–WEBSTER, INCORPORATED, is an American company that publishes reference books, especially known for its dictionaries . In 1828, George and Charles Merriam founded the company as G it sold poorly, with only 2,500 copies putting him in debt. However, in 1840, he published the second edition in two volumes with much greater success. Author and poet Nathan W. Austin explores the intersection of lexicographical and poetic practices in American literature, and attempts to map out a "lexical poetics" using Webster's dictionaries as a base. He shows ways that American poetry inherited Webster's ideas and draws on his lexicography to develop the language
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Cochabamba
COCHABAMBA (Aymara : Quchapampa, Quechua : Quchapampa) is a city in central Bolivia
Bolivia
, in a valley with the same name, in the Andes mountain range . It is the capital of the Cochabamba Department and is the fourth largest city in Bolivia
Bolivia
, with a population of 630,587 according to the 2012 Bolivian census . Its name is from a compound of the Quechua words qucha, meaning "lake", and pampa , "open plain ". Residents of the city and surrounding areas are commonly referred to as cochalas, or, more formally, cochabambinos. It is known as the "City of Eternal Spring" and "The Garden City" because of its spring-like temperatures all year round. It is also known as "La Llajta", which means " town" in Quechua
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