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Comino
Comino
Comino
(Maltese: Kemmuna), formerly called Ephaestia,[2][3] is a small island of the Maltese archipelago between the islands of Malta
Malta
and Gozo
Gozo
in the Mediterranean Sea, measuring 3.5 square kilometres (1.4 sq mi) in area. Named after the cumin seed that once flourished in the Maltese islands, the island is the least densely populated area in the Republic of Malta. It has a permanent population of only three residents, following the death of the fourth resident in 2017.[1] Administratively, it is part of the municipality of Għajnsielem, in southeastern Gozo. One priest and one policeman commute from the nearby island of Gozo
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Annunciation
The Annunciation
Annunciation
(from Latin
Latin
annuntiatio), also referred to as the Annunciation
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De Redin Towers
The De Redin Towers (Maltese: Torrijiet ta' De Redin) are a series of small coastal watchtowers built in Malta
Malta
by the Order of Saint John between 1658 and 1659
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Knights Hospitaller
The Order of Knights of the Hospital
Hospital
of Saint John of Jerusalem (Latin: Ordo Fratrum Hospitalis Sancti Ioannis Hierosolymitani), also known as the Order of Saint John, Order of Hospitallers, Knights Hospitaller, Knights Hospitalier or Hospitallers, was a medieval Catholic
Catholic
military order that became the modern Sovereign Military Order of Malta, which remains a sovereign subject of international law, as well as the Protestant members of the Alliance of the Orders of Saint John of Jerusalem
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Wild Boar
The wild boar (Sus scrofa), also known as the wild swine[3] Eurasian wild pig,[4] or simply wild pig,[5] is a suid native to much of Eurasia, North Africa, and the Greater Sunda Islands. Human intervention has spread its distribution further, making the species one of the widest-ranging mammals in the world, as well as the most widely spread suiform.[4] Its wide range, high numbers, and adaptability mean that it is classed as least concern by the IUCN[1] and it has become an invasive species in part of its introduced range. The animal probably originated in Southeast Asia during the Early Pleistocene,[6] and outcompeted other suid species as it spread throughout the Old World.[7] As of 1990, up to 16 subspecies are recognized, which are divided into four regional groupings based on skull height and lacrimal bone length.[2] The species lives in matriarchal societies consisting of interrelated females and their young (both male and female)
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Hare
See textHares and jackrabbits are leporids belonging to the genus Lepus. Hares are classified into the same family as rabbits. They are similar in size and form to rabbits and eat the same diet. They are generally herbivorous and long-eared, they are fast runners, and they typically live solitarily or in pairs. Hare
Hare
species are native to Africa, Eurasia, North America, and the Japanese archipelago. Five leporid species with "hare" in their common names are not considered true hares: the hispid hare (Caprolagus hispidus), and four species known as red rock hares (comprising Pronolagus). Meanwhile, jackrabbits are hares rather than rabbits. A hare less than one year old is called a leveret
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Galley Slave
A galley slave is a slave rowing in a galley, either a convicted criminal sentenced to work at the oar (French: galérien), or a kind of human chattel, often a prisoner of war, assigned to his duty of rowing.[1]Contents1 Antiquity1.1 Greek navies 1.2 Roman and Carthaginian navies2 Early modern era 3 In fiction 4 Notes 5 References 6 Further readingAntiquity[edit] Ancient navies generally preferred to rely on free men to man their galleys. Slaves were usually not put at the oars except in times of pressing manpower demands or extreme emergency,[2] and in some of these cases they would earn their freedom by this
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Alfonso V Of Aragon
Aragon
Aragon
(/ˈærəɡɒn/ or /ˈærəɡən/, Spanish and Aragonese: Aragón [aɾaˈɣon], Catalan: Aragó [əɾəˈɣo] or [aɾaˈɣo]) is an autonomous community in Spain, coextensive with the medieval Kingdom of Aragon. Located in northeastern Spain, the Aragonese autonomous community comprises three provinces (from north to south): Huesca, Zaragoza, and Teruel. Its capital is Zaragoza
Zaragoza
(also called Saragossa in English). The current Statute of Autonomy declares Aragon a historic nationality of Spain. Covering an area of 47720 km2 (18420 sq mi)[2], the region's terrain ranges diversely from permanent glaciers to verdant valleys, rich pasture lands and orchards, through to the arid steppe plains of the central lowlands
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Barbary Corsairs
The Barbary pirates, sometimes called Barbary corsairs or Ottoman corsairs, were Ottoman pirates and privateers who operated from North Africa, based primarily in the ports of Salé, Rabat, Algiers, Tunis, and Tripoli. This area was known in Europe
Europe
as the Barbary Coast, a term derived from the name of its Berber inhabitants. Their predation extended throughout the Mediterranean, south along West Africa's Atlantic
Atlantic
seaboard and even South America,[1] and into the North Atlantic
Atlantic
as far north as Iceland, but they primarily operated in the western Mediterranean
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Alof De Wignacourt
Fra Alof de Wignacourt
Alof de Wignacourt
(1547 – 14 September 1622) was a French nobleman who was the 54th Grand Master of the Order of St. John of Jerusalem from 10 February 1601 to his death in 1622. Unlike a number of the other Grand Masters, he was popular with the Maltese people.[1] Wignacourt is mostly remembered for the construction of the Wignacourt Aqueduct as well as a series of coastal towers which also bear his name.1601 Grano coin of WignacourtWignacourt joined the Order in 1564, aged seventeen, and distinguished himself at the Great Siege of Malta
Great Siege of Malta
a year later
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Lascaris Towers
The Lascaris Towers (Maltese: Torrijiet ta' Lascaris) are a series of mostly small coastal watchtowers built in Malta
Malta
by the Order of Saint John between 1637 and 1652. The first seven towers were built around the coast of mainland Malta
Malta
between 1637 and 1638. Between 1647 and 1652, a large tower was also built on mainland Malta, and two smaller ones were built on Gozo.Contents1 History1.1 Commissioning and construction 1.2 Eighteenth and nineteenth centuries 1.3 Conservation and restoration2 The towers 3 References 4 See alsoHistory[edit]Giovanni Paolo LascarisCommissioning and construction[edit] The Italian knight Giovanni Paolo Lascaris
Giovanni Paolo Lascaris
was elected Grand Master of the Order of St. John on 16 June 1636
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Above Mean Sea Level
Metres
Metres
above mean sea level (MAMSL) or simply metres above sea level (MASL or m a.s.l.) is a standard metric measurement in metres of the elevation or altitude of a location in reference to a historic mean sea level. Mean sea levels are affected by climate change and other factors and change over time
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Limestone
Limestone
Limestone
is a sedimentary rock, composed mainly of skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as coral, forams and molluscs. Its major materials are the minerals calcite and aragonite, which are different crystal forms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). About 10% of sedimentary rocks are limestones. The solubility of limestone in water and weak acid solutions leads to karst landscapes, in which water erodes the limestone over thousands to millions of years
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Siege Of Malta (1798–1800)
The Siege of Malta, also known as the Siege of Valletta
Valletta
or the French Blockade
Blockade
(Maltese: L-Imblokk tal-Franċiżi), was a two-year siege and blockade of the French garrison in Valletta
Valletta
and the Three Cities, the largest settlements and main port on the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
island of Malta, between 1798 and 1800. Malta
Malta
had been captured by a French expeditionary force during the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
campaign of 1798, and garrisoned with 3,000 men under the command of Claude-Henri Belgrand de Vaubois
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United Kingdom Of Great Britain And Ireland
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland
Ireland
was a sovereign country in western Europe, the predecessor to the modern United Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Great Britain
and Northern Ireland. It was established on 1 January 1801 by the Acts of Union 1800, which merged the kingdoms of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Ireland. Britain financed the European coalition that defeated France in 1815 in the Napoleonic Wars. Britain, with its unsurpassed Royal Navy
Royal Navy
and British Empire, became the foremost world power for the next century. The Crimean War
Crimean War
with Russia and the Boer wars were relatively small operations in a largely peaceful century.[1] Rapid industrialisation that began in the decades prior to the state's formation continued up until the mid-19th century
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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