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Columbia University
Columbia University
Columbia University
(Columbia; officially Columbia University
Columbia University
in the City of New York), established in 1754, is a private Ivy League research university in Upper Manhattan, New York City. Columbia contains the oldest college in the state of New York and is the fifth chartered institution of higher learning in the United States, making it one of nine colonial colleges founded prior to the Declaration of Independence.[9] It was established as King's College by royal charter of George II of Great Britain
George II of Great Britain
and renamed Columbia College in 1784 following the American Revolutionary War. The college has produced numerous distinguished alumni
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Santiago
Santiago
Santiago
(/ˌsæntiˈɑːɡoʊ/, Spanish: [sanˈtjaɣo]), or also known as Santiago
Santiago
de Chile
Chile
([sanˈtjaɣo ðe ˈtʃile] ( listen)), is the capital and largest city of Chile
Chile
as well as one of the largest cities in the Americas. It is the center of Chile's largest and the most densely populated conurbation. The city is entirely located in the country's central valley. Most of the city lies between 500 m (1,640 ft) and 650 m (2,133 ft) above mean sea level. Founded in 1541 by the Spanish conquistador Pedro de Valdivia, Santiago
Santiago
has been the capital city of Chile
Chile
since colonial times. The city has a downtown core of 19th-century neoclassical architecture and winding side-streets, dotted by art deco, neo-gothic, and other styles
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Undergraduate Education
Undergraduate education is the post-secondary education previous to the postgraduate education. It includes all the academic programs up to the level of a bachelor's degree. For example, in the United States, an entry level university student is known as an undergraduate, while students of higher degrees are known as graduates
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Rio De Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro
(/ˈriːoʊ di ʒəˈnɛəroʊ, -deɪ ʒə-, -də dʒə-/; Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈʁi.u d(ʒi) ʒɐˈnejɾu];[3] River of January), or simply Rio,[4] is the second-most populous municipality in Brazil
Brazil
and the sixth-most populous in the Americas. The metropolis is anchor to the Rio de Janeiro metropolitan area, the second-most populous metropolitan area in Brazil
Brazil
and sixth-most populous in the Americas. Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro
is the capital of the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil's third-most populous state
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Istanbul
Istanbul
Istanbul
(UK: /ˌɪstænˈbʊl/, /-ˈbuːl/ or US: /-stɑːn-/ or /ˈɪstənˌbʊl/;[7][8][9] Turkish: İstanbul [isˈtɑnbuɫ] ( listen)), historically known as Constantinople
Constantinople
and Byzantium, is the most populous city in what is modern-day Turkey
Turkey
and the country's economic, cultural, and historic center. Istanbul
Istanbul
is a transcontinental city in Eurasia, straddling the Bosphorus
Bosphorus
strait (which separates Europe
Europe
and Asia) between the Sea of Marmara and the Black Sea
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Madison Avenue
Route map: Google Template:Attached KML/Madison Avenue KML is from Wikidata Not to be confused with Madison Street (Manhattan). For other uses, see Madison Avenue
Madison Avenue
(other).Madison AvenueMadison Avenue, looking north from 40th StreetOwner City of New YorkMaintained by NYCDOTLength 6.0 mi[1] (9.7 km)Location Manhattan, New York CityPostal code 10010, 10016, 10017, 10022, 10065, 10021, 10075, 10028, 10128, 10029, 10035, 10037South end 23rd Street in FlatironMajor junctions
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United States Declaration Of Independence
The United States
United States
Declaration of Independence is the statement adopted by the Second Continental Congress
Second Continental Congress
meeting at the Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
State House (now known as Independence Hall) in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776. The Declaration announced that the thirteen American colonies then at war with the Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Great Britain
would regard themselves as thirteen independent sovereign states no longer under British rule. With the Declaration, these new states took a collective first step toward forming the United States
United States
of America
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Upper Manhattan
Upper Manhattan
Manhattan
denotes the most northern region of the New York City Borough of Manhattan
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Doctoral University
The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education
Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education
is a framework for classifying colleges and universities in the United States. The framework primarily serves educational and research purposes, where it is often important to identify groups of roughly comparable institutions.[1] The classification includes all accredited, degree-granting colleges and universities in the United States that are represented in the National Center for Education Statistics Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS). The Carnegie Classification was created by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education in 1970
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Athletic Nickname
The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States
United States
is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. Typically as a matter of engendering school spirit, the institution either officially or unofficially uses this moniker of the institution's athletic teams also as a nickname to refer to people associated with the institution, especially its current students, but also often its alumni, its faculty, and its administration as well. This practice at the university and college tertiary higher-education level has proven so popular that it extended to the high school secondary-education level in the United States
United States
and in recent years even to the primary-education level as well
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School Colors
In the United States, school colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. Most schools have two colors, which are usually chosen to avoid conflicts with other schools[1] with which the school competes in sports and other activities. The colors are often worn to build morale among the teachers and pupils, and as an expression of school spirit.[2] School
School
colors are often found in pairs and rarely no more than trios, though some professional teams use up to four colors in a set. The choice of colors usually follows the rule of tincture from heraldry, but exceptions to this rule are known. Common primary colors include orange, purple, blue, red, and green. These colors are either paired with a color representing a metal (often black, brown, gray (or silver), white, or gold), or occasionally each other, such as orange/blue, red/green, or blue/yellow
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Urban Area
An urban area is a human settlement with high population density and infrastructure of built environment. Urban areas are created through urbanization and are categorized by urban morphology as cities, towns, conurbations or suburbs. In urbanism, the term contrasts to rural areas such as villages and hamlets and in urban sociology or urban anthropology it contrasts with natural environment
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Postgraduate Education
Postgraduate
Postgraduate
education, or graduate education in North America, involves learning and studying for academic or professional degrees, academic or professional certificates, academic or professional diplomas, or other qualifications for which a first or bachelor's degree generally is required, and it is normally considered to be part of higher education. In North America, this level is generally referred to as graduate school (or sometimes colloquially as grad school). The organization and structure of postgraduate education varies in different countries, as well as in different institutions within countries
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NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
(D-I) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in the United States. D-I schools include the major collegiate athletic powers, with larger budgets, more elaborate facilities and more athletic scholarships than Divisions II and III as well as many smaller schools committed to the highest level of intercollegiate competition. This level was once called the University Division of the NCAA, in contrast to the lower level College Division; these terms were replaced with numeric divisions in 1973
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