HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Clarke School For The Deaf
Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech, formerly Clarke School for the Deaf, is a private school located in Northampton, Massachusetts
Northampton, Massachusetts
that specializes in educating deaf children using listening and spoken language (oralism) through the assistance of hearing aids and cochlear implants
[...More...]

"Clarke School For The Deaf" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

New York City, New York
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
[...More...]

"New York City, New York" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Deaf Culture
Deaf
Deaf
culture is the set of social beliefs, behaviors, art, literary traditions, history, values, and shared institutions of communities that are influenced by deafness and which use sign languages as the main means of communication. When used as a cultural label especially within the culture, the word deaf is often written with a capital D and referred to as "big D Deaf" in speech and sign. When used as a label for the audiological condition, it is written with a lower case d.[1][2] Members of the Deaf
Deaf
community tend to view deafness as a difference in human experience rather than a disability or disease.[3][4] Many members take pride in their Deaf
Deaf
identity.[5] Deaf
Deaf
people, in the sense of a community or culture, can then be seen as a minority group, and therefore some who are a part of this community may feel misunderstood by those who don't know sign language
[...More...]

"Deaf Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

President Of The United States Of America
House of RepresentativesSpeaker Paul Ryan
Paul Ryan
(R)Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R)Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi
Nancy Pelosi
(D)Co
[...More...]

"President Of The United States Of America" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Governor Of Massachusetts
The Governor
Governor
of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
is the head of the executive branch of the Government of Massachusetts
Government of Massachusetts
and serves as commander-in-chief of the Commonwealth's military forces
[...More...]

"Governor Of Massachusetts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Western Massachusetts
Western Massachusetts
Massachusetts
is a region in Massachusetts, one of the six U.S. states that make up the New England
New England
region of the United States. Western Massachusetts
Massachusetts
has diverse topography; 22 universities, with approximately 100,000 university students;[1] and such institutions as Tanglewood, the Springfield Armory, and Jacob's Pillow. The western part of Western Massachusetts
Massachusetts
includes the Berkshire Mountains, where there are several vacation resorts
[...More...]

"Western Massachusetts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Grace Anna Goodhue
Grace Anna Goodhue Coolidge (January 3, 1879 – July 8, 1957) was the wife of the 30th President of the United States, Calvin Coolidge. She was the First Lady of the United States
First Lady of the United States
from 1923 to 1929 and the Second Lady of the United States
Second Lady of the United States
from 1921 to 1923. She graduated from the University of Vermont
University of Vermont
in 1902 with a bachelor of arts degree in teaching and joined the Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech
Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech
in Northampton, Massachusetts
Northampton, Massachusetts
to teach deaf children to communicate by lip reading, rather than by signing.[1] She met Calvin Coolidge
Calvin Coolidge
in 1904, and the two were married the following year. As her husband advanced his political career, Coolidge avoided politics
[...More...]

"Grace Anna Goodhue" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sign Language
Sign languages (also known as signed languages) are languages that use manual communication to convey meaning. This can include simultaneously employing hand gestures, movement, orientation of the fingers, arms or body, and facial expressions to convey a speaker's ideas. Sign languages often share significant similarities with their respective spoken language, such as American Sign Language
Language
(ASL) with American English)
[...More...]

"Sign Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jacksonville, Florida
Jacksonville is the most populous city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Florida and the largest city by area in the contiguous United States.[9][10] It is the seat of Duval County,[11] with which the city government consolidated in 1968. Consolidation gave Jacksonville its great size and placed most of its metropolitan population within the city limits. With an estimated population of 907,529 as of 2017, Jacksonville is also the most populous city in the southeastern United States.[12] The Jacksonville metropolitan area
Jacksonville metropolitan area
has a population of 1,626,611 and is the fourth largest in Florida.[13] Jacksonville is centered on the banks of the St. Johns River
St. Johns River
in the First Coast
First Coast
region of northeast Florida, about 25 miles (40 km) south of the Georgia state line and 340 miles (550 km) north of Miami
[...More...]

"Jacksonville, Florida" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
[...More...]

"English Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Philadelphia
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(/ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the sixth-most populous city in the United States, with an estimated population of 1,567,872[7] and more than 6 million in the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area, as of 2016[update].[5] Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the economic and cultural anchor of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley, located along the lower Delaware
Delaware
and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis
[...More...]

"Philadelphia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hearing Impairment
Hearing
Hearing
loss, also known as hearing impairment, is a partial or total inability to hear.[5] A deaf person has little to no hearing.[2] Hearing
Hearing
loss may occur in one or both ears.[2] In children hearing problems can affect the ability to learn spoken language and in adults it can
[...More...]

"Hearing Impairment" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Grace Coolidge
Grace Anna Goodhue Coolidge (January 3, 1879 – July 8, 1957) was the wife of the 30th President of the United States, Calvin Coolidge. She was the First Lady from 1923 to 1929. She graduated from the University of Vermont
University of Vermont
in 1902 with a bachelor of arts degree in teaching and joined the Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech
Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech
in Northampton, Massachusetts
Northampton, Massachusetts
to teach deaf children to communicate by lip reading, rather than by signing.[1] She met Calvin Coolidge
Calvin Coolidge
in 1904, and the two were married the following year. As her husband advanced his political career, Coolidge avoided politics
[...More...]

"Grace Coolidge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Oral Language
A spoken language is a language produced by articulate sounds, as opposed to a written language. Many languages have no written form and so are only spoken. An oral language or vocal language is a language produced with the vocal tract, as opposed to a sign language, which is produced with the hands and face. The term "spoken language" is sometimes used to mean only vocal languages, especially by linguists, making all three terms synonyms by excluding sign languages. Others refer to sign language as "spoken", especially in contrast to written transcriptions of signs.[1][2][3] In spoken language, much of the meaning is determined by the context. That contrasts with written language in which more of the meaning is provided directly by the text. In spoken language, the truth of a proposition is determined by common-sense reference to experience, but in written language, a greater emphasis is placed on logical and coherent argument
[...More...]

"Oral Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ella Seaver Owen
Ella Seaver Owen (February 26, 1852 – November 11, 1910) was an American artist and teacher. For many years, she taught oil, watercolor, and china painting, and was one of the pioneers, outside of New York City, in china firing.[1] Owen was one of the first women admitted to the University of Vermont, and was one of the founders of the Alpha Rho out of which grew Lambda of Kappa Alpha Theta.[2]Contents1 Early years and education 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 References4.1 Attribution5 External linksEarly years and education[edit] Ella Seaver was born in Williamstown, Vermont, February 26, 1852. Her father, Asahel Bingham Seaver, born and brought up in Williamstown, Vermont, was a descendant of Robert Seaver, an Englishman, who came to the United States in the seventeenth century. Her mother, whose maiden name was Aurelia Adams, was also of English descent.[1] Owen was one of two children
[...More...]

"Ella Seaver Owen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Smith College
Smith College
Smith College
is a private, independent women's liberal arts college with coed graduate and certificate programs in Northampton, Massachusetts. It is the largest member of the Seven Sisters. In its 2017 edition, U.S
[...More...]

"Smith College" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.