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Clam
Clam
Clam
is a common name for several kinds of bivalve molluscs. The word is often applied only to those that are edible and live as infauna, spending most of their lives partially buried in the sand of the ocean floor. Clams have two shells of equal size connected by two adductor muscles and have a powerful burrowing foot.[1] Clams in the culinary sense do not live attached to a substrate (whereas oysters and mussels do) and do not live near the bottom (whereas scallops do). In culinary usage, clams are commonly eaten marine bivalves, as in clam digging and the resulting soup, clam chowder
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Tellina
See textSynonyms[1]Cadella Dall, Bartsch & Rehder, 1938 Fabulina Gray, 1851 Megangulus Afshar, 1969 Moerella Fischer, 1887 Pinguitellina Iredale, 1927 Scutarcopagia Pilsbry, 1918 Tellina
Tellina
is a widely distributed genus of marine bivalve molluscs, in the family Tellinidae.[1] Species[edit] Tellina
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Venerupis Decussata
Venerupis
Venerupis
decussata is a marine bivalve mollusc in the family Veneridae, commonly known as the cross-cut carpet shell.Contents1 Taxonomy 2 Description 3 Distribution 4 ReferencesTaxonomy[edit] The species name Venerupis
Venerupis
decussata (Linnaeus, 1758) is considered valid by the World Register of Marine Species
World Register of Marine Species
(WoRMS) with a range limited to the north east Atlantic Ocean.[1] The Integrated Taxonomic Identification System (ITIS) also accepts the name as valid and states that it has a synonym, Tapes decussata.[2] WoRMS accepts as valid the name of another species, Ruditapes decussatus (Linnaeus, 1758), a species with a world-wide distribution
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Miso Soup
Miso
Miso
soup (味噌汁, misoshiru) is a traditional Japanese soup consisting of a stock called "dashi" into which softened miso paste is mixed. Many ingredients are added depending on regional and seasonal recipes, and personal preference. Miso
Miso
soup is one of the two basic soup types of Japanese cuisine
Japanese cuisine
– the other one is Suimono
Suimono
(clear soup).Contents1 Miso
Miso
paste 2 Stock 3 Solid ingredients 4 Preparation and serving4.1 Instant miso soup 4.2 Wappani5 Health benefits 6 See also 7 References 8 External links Miso
Miso
paste[edit] Main article: Miso The choice of miso paste for the miso soup defines a great deal of its character and flavor
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Tsukudani
Tsukudani
Tsukudani
(佃煮) is small seafood, meat or seaweed that has been simmered in soy sauce and mirin.[1] High osmotic pressure preserves the ingredients. Its name originates from Tsukudajima, the island (in present-day Chūō, Tokyo) where it was first made in the Edo period. Many kinds of tsukudani are sold. Traditionally made tsukudani is preservable and has been favored as a storable side dish in Japanese kitchens since the Edo period. Tsukudani
Tsukudani
can be made with kombu or wakame seaweeds. It is usually eaten with steamed rice as a flavoring agent since the flavor is very intense (approximately 1 tbsp for one bowl of rice)
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Atlantic
The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
is the second largest of the world's oceans with a total area of about 106,460,000 square kilometers (41,100,000 square miles).[2][3] It covers approximately 20 percent of the Earth's surface and about 29 percent of its water surface area. It separates the "Old World" from the "New World". The Atlantic Ocean
Ocean
occupies an elongated, S-shaped basin extending longitudinally between Eurasia
Eurasia
and Africa to the east, and the Americas to the west. As one component of the interconnected global ocean, it is connected in the north to the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the Pacific Ocean
Ocean
in the southwest, the Indian Ocean
Ocean
in the southeast, and the Southern Ocean
Southern Ocean
in the south (other definitions describe the Atlantic as extending southward to Antarctica)
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The Maritimes
The Maritimes, also called the Maritime provinces (French: Provinces maritimes) or the Canadian Maritimes, is a region of Eastern Canada consisting of three provinces: New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island (PEI). The Maritimes
The Maritimes
had a population of 1,813,606 in 2016.[3] The Maritimes, along with a fourth province – Canada's easternmost province, Newfoundland and Labrador
Newfoundland and Labrador
– make up the region of Atlantic Canada. Located along the Atlantic coast, various aquatic sub-basins are located in the Maritimes, such as the Gulf of Maine
Gulf of Maine
and Gulf of St. Lawrence. The region is located northeast of New England, southeast of Quebec's Gaspé Peninsula, and southwest of the island of Newfoundland
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Valve (mollusc)
A mollusc valve is each articulating part of the shell of a mollusc. Each part is known as a valve or in the case of chitons, a "plate". Members of two classes of molluscs: the Bivalvia
Bivalvia
(clams) and the Polyplacophora
Polyplacophora
(chitons) have valves. Species within one family of very unusual small sea snails, marine opisthobranch gastropods in the family Juliidae, also have two articulating shells or valves, which resemble those of a bivalve. This exceptional family is commonly known as the bivalved gastropods. Gastropods in general are sometimes called "univalves", because in those that have a shell, the shell is usually in one part.Contents1 Chitons 2 Bivalves 3 Bivalved gastropods 4 ReferencesChitons[edit]Live individual of the lined chiton Tonicella lineata, head end towards the rightThe valves of chitons are eight dorsal, articulated shell plates, which are frequently coloured and sculpted
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Razor Clams
Razor clam is a common name for long, narrow, saltwater clams (which resemble a closed straight razor in shape), in the genera Ensis, Siliqua, Solecurtus, and Solen, including:Atlantic jackknife clam, Ensis
Ensis
directus Razor shell, Ensis
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Sandy Hook, New Jersey
Sandy Hook
Sandy Hook
is a barrier spit in Middletown Township,[3] Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. The barrier spit, approximately 6 miles (9.7 km) in length and varying from 0.1 to 1.0 mile (0.16 to 1.61 km) wide, is located at the north end of the Jersey Shore. It encloses the southern entrance of Lower New York Bay
Lower New York Bay
south of New York City, protecting it from the open waters of the Atlantic Ocean to the east
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Infauna
A sediment-dwelling organism is a creature or micro-organism which lives mainly inside sediment – the layer of small particles at the bottom of a body of water. These are collectively known as infauna, as opposed to epifauna – the benthic organisms which live on the surface of the sediment. Such creatures are found in the fossil record and include lingulata, trilobites and worms. They made burrows in the sediment as protection and may also have fed upon detritus or the mat of microbes which tended to grow on the surface of the sediment.[1] Today, a variety of organisms live in and disturb the sediment
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Common Name
In biology, a common name of a taxon or organism (also known as a vernacular name, English name, colloquial name, trivial name, trivial epithet, country name, popular name, or farmer's name) is a name that is based on the normal language of everyday life; this kind of name is often contrasted with the scientific name for the same organism, which is Latinized. A common name is sometimes frequently used, but that is by no means always the case.[1] Sometimes common names are created by authorities on one particular subject, in an attempt to make it possible for members of the general public (including such interested parties as fishermen, farmers, etc.) to be able to refer to one particular species of organism without needing to be able to memorise or pronounce the Latinized scientific name
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Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
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Ceviche
Ceviche
Ceviche
(Spanish pronunciation: [seˈβitʃe])[5][6][7] is a seafood dish popular in the coastal regions of Latin America
Latin America
and the Caribbean.[2] Though the origin of ceviche is hotly debated, the dish is most closely associated with Peru.[8] It is typically made from fresh raw fish cured in citrus juices, such as lemon or lime, and spiced with ají or chili peppers. Additional seasonings, such as chopped onions, salt, and cilantro, may also be added
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Meretrix Lusoria
The hamaguri also known as the Asian Hard Clam or the Common Orient Clam, scientific name Meretrix lusoria, is a species of saltwater clam, a marine bivalve mollusk in the family Veneridae, the Venus clams. This species is native to Asia, found along water beds and the coastal waters of China, Korea, and Japan.[1] It is commercially exploited for sushi, and its shells are traditionally used to make white go stones. References[edit]^ mhagan@mindspring.com, Melissa Hagan,. "NEMESIS Database Species Summary". invasions.si.edu. Retrieved 2017-10-24. Taxon identifiersWd: Q1134457 EoL: 4947935 GBIF: 4372751 iNaturalist: 361719 NCBI: 74491 WoRMS: 397139Authority controlNDL: 00562877This Veneridae-related article is a stub
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Animal
Animals are multicellular eukaryotic organisms that form the biological kingdom Animalia. With few exceptions, animals consume organic material, breathe oxygen, are able to move, reproduce sexually, and grow from a hollow sphere of cells, the blastula, during embryonic development. Over 1.5 million living animal species have been described—of which around 1 million are insects—but it has been estimated there are over 7 million in total. Animals range in size from 8.5 millionths of a metre to 33.6 metres (110 ft) long and have complex interactions with each other and their environments, forming intricate food webs. The study of animals is called zoology. Aristotle divided animals into those with blood and those without. Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus
created the first hierarchical biological classification for animals in 1758 with his Systema Naturae, which Jean-Baptiste Lamarck expanded into 14 phyla by 1809
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