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Charles Beyer
Charles Frederick Beyer (an anglicised form of his original German name Carl Friedrich Beyer) (14 May 1813 – 2 June 1876) was a celebrated German-British locomotive designer and builder, and co-founder of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. He was the co-founder and head engineer of Beyer, Peacock and Company
Beyer, Peacock and Company
in Gorton, Manchester.[1] A philanthropist and deeply religious, he founded three parish churches (and associated schools) in Gorton, was a governor of Manchester
Manchester
Grammar School, and remains the single biggest donor to what is today the University of Manchester.[2] He is buried in the graveyard of Llantysilio
Llantysilio
church, Llantysilio, Llangollen, Denbighshire North Wales. Llantysilio
Llantysilio
church is within the grounds of his former 700 acre Llantysilio
Llantysilio
Hall estate
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District Railway
The Metropolitan District Railway
District Railway
(commonly known as the District Railway) was a passenger railway that served London from 1868 to 1933. Established in 1864 to complete the inner circle, an underground railway in London, the first part of the line opened using gas-lit wooden carriages hauled by steam locomotives. The Metropolitan Railway operated all services until the District introduced its own trains in 1871. The railway was soon extended westwards through Earl's Court to Fulham, Richmond, Ealing
Ealing
and Hounslow
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Joseph Whitworth
Sir Joseph Whitworth, 1st Baronet
Baronet
(21 December 1803 – 22 January 1887) was an English engineer, entrepreneur, inventor and philanthropist.[2] In 1841, he devised the British Standard
British Standard
Whitworth system, which created an accepted standard for screw threads.[3] Whitworth also created the Whitworth rifle, often called the "sharpshooter" because of its accuracy and considered one of the earliest examples of a sniper rifle.[4][5][6][7][8] At his death in 1887, he bequeathed much of his fortune for the people of Manchester, with the Whitworth Art Gallery
Whitworth Art Gallery
and Christie Hospital partly funded by Whitworth's money. Whitworth Street
Whitworth Street
and Whitworth Hall in Manchester
Manchester
are named in his honour
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Karl Marx
Karl Marx[6] (/mɑːrks/;[7] German: [ˈkaɐ̯l ˈmaɐ̯ks]; 5 May 1818 – 14 March 1883) was a German philosopher, economist, historian, political theorist, sociologist, journalist and revolutionary socialist. Born in Trier
Trier
to a middle-class family, Marx studied law and Hegelian philosophy. Due to his political publications Marx became stateless and lived in exile in London, where he continued to develop his thought in collaboration with German thinker Friedrich Engels
Friedrich Engels
and publish his writings. His best-known titles are the 1848 pamphlet, The Communist
Communist
Manifesto, and the three-volume Das Kapital
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The Condition Of The Working Class In England
The Condition of the Working Class in England
The Condition of the Working Class in England
(German: Die Lage der arbeitenden Klasse in England) is an 1845 book by the German philosopher Friedrich Engels, a study of the industrial working class in Victorian England. Engels' first book, it was originally written in German as Die Lage der arbeitenden Klasse in England; an English translation was published in 1885
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List Of Rulers Of Saxony
This article lists dukes, electors, and kings ruling over different territories named Saxony
Saxony
from the beginning of the Saxon Duchy in the 9th century to the end of the Saxon Kingdom in 1918. The electors of Saxony
Saxony
from John the Steadfast onwards have b
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Daniel Gooch
Sir Daniel Gooch, 1st Baronet
Baronet
(24 August 1816 – 15 October 1889) was an English railway locomotive and transatlantic cable engineer and Conservative politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1865 to 1885. He was the first Superintendent of Locomotive Engines on the Great Western Railway
Great Western Railway
from 1837 to 1864 and its chairman from 1865 to 1889
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Manchester Literary And Philosophical Society
The Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society, popularly known as the Lit & Phil, is a learned society in Manchester, England.Contents1 History 2 Dalton Medal 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Established in 1781 as the Literary and Philosophical Society of Manchester,[1] by Thomas Percival, Thomas Barnes and Thomas Henry,[2] other prominent members have included Robert Owen,[3] John Dalton, James Prescott Joule, Tom Kilburn, Peter Mark Roget, Ernest Rutherford and Joseph Whitworth.[4] The first formal meeting of the society took place on 14 March 1781. Meetings were held in a back room of the Cross Street Chapel until December 1799, after which the society moved into its own premises in George Street.[5] From the outset it was an exclusive organisation, with membership being costly and determined by ballot. Its influence was considerable despite, for example, having only 178 members in 1842
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John Dalton
John Dalton
John Dalton
FRS (/ˈdɔːltən/; 6 September 1766 – 27 July 1844) was an English chemist, physicist, and meteorologist. He is best known for proposing the modern atomic theory and for his research into colour blindness, sometimes referred to as Daltonism
Daltonism
in his honour.Contents1 Early life 2 Early careers 3 Scientific contributions3.1 Meteorology3.1.1 Measuring mountains3.2 Colour blindness 3.3 Gas laws 3.4 Atomic theory 3.5 Atomic weights 3.6 Other investigations 3.7 Experimental approach4 Other publications 5 Public life 6 Personal life 7 Disability and death 8 Legacy 9 See also 10 Notes 11 References 12 Sources 13 External linksEarly life[edit] John Dalton
John Dalton
was born into a Quaker
Quaker
family in Eaglesfield, near Cockermouth, in Cumberland, England.[1] His father was a weaver
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James Prescott Joule
James Prescott Joule
Joule
FRS H FRSE
FRSE
DCL LLD (/dʒuːl/;[1] (24 December 1818 – 11 October 1889) was an English physicist, mathematician and brewer, born in Salford, Lancashire. Joule
Joule
studied the nature of heat, and discovered its relationship to mechanical work (see energy). This led to the law of conservation of energy, which led to the development of the first law of thermodynamics. The SI derived unit
SI derived unit
of energy, the joule, is named after James Joule. He worked with Lord Kelvin
Lord Kelvin
to develop the absolute scale of temperature, which came to be called the Kelvin
Kelvin
scale
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William Fairbairn
Sir William Fairbairn, 1st Baronet
Baronet
of Ardwick (19 February 1789 – 18 August 1874) was a Scottish civil engineer, structural engineer and shipbuilder. In 1854 he succeeded George Stephenson
George Stephenson
and Robert Stephenson to become the third president of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers.[2]Contents1 Early career 2 Structural studies 3 Shipbuilding 4 Railway locomotives 5 Boilers 6 Investigations 7 Honours 8 Works 9 Further reading 10 See also 11 ReferencesEarly career[edit] Born in Kelso to a local farmer, Fairbairn showed an early mechanical aptitude and served as an apprentice millwright in Newcastle upon Tyne where he befriended the young George Stephenson. He moved to Manchester
Manchester
in 1813 to work for Adam Parkinson and Thomas Hewes
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Henry Enfield Roscoe
Sir Henry Enfield Roscoe FRS (7 January 1833 – 18 December 1915) was a British chemist. He is particularly noted for early work on vanadium and for photochemical studies.Contents1 Life and work 2 Publications2.1 Selected works3 Commemoration 4 References 5 External linksLife and work[edit]Kirchhoff, Bunsen, and Roscoe (1862)Henry Enfield Roscoe was born in London, the son of Henry Roscoe (1800–1836) and Maria Roscoe (née Fletcher)(1798-1885), and grandson of William Roscoe
William Roscoe
(1753–1831).[1] Stanley Jevons
Stanley Jevons
was a cousin. Roscoe studied at the Liverpool Institute for Boys
Liverpool Institute for Boys
and University College London. He then went to Heidelberg
Heidelberg
to work under Robert Bunsen, who became a lifelong friend
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Manchester, Sheffield And Lincolnshire Railway
The Manchester, Sheffield
Sheffield
and Lincolnshire
Lincolnshire
Railway
Railway
(MS&LR) was formed by amalgamation in 1847
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Victoria University Of Manchester
The former Victoria University of Manchester, now the University of Manchester, was founded in 1851 as Owens College. In 1880, the college joined the federal Victoria University, gaining an independent university charter in 1904 as the Victoria University of Manchester after the collapse of the federal university.[2] On 1 October 2004, the Victoria University of Manchester
Manchester
merged with the University of Manchester
Manchester
Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST) to form a new, larger entity, and the new university was named The University of Manchester.Contents1 History1.1 1851–1951 1.2 1951–20042 Officers 3 Notable people 4 Motto and arms 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksHistory[edit] 1851–1951[edit] The university was founded in 1851 as Owens College, named after John Owens, a textile merchant, who left a bequest of £96,942 for the purpose
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Charles Geach
Charles Geach (1808 – 1 November 1854) was a prominent English businessman, industrialist, banker and politician of the early to mid-19th century, strongly associated with banking and manufacturing interests. He was a co-founder and the general first manager of the Midland Bank, the first treasurer of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, a prominent investor in several major engineering businesses, and MP for Coventry
Coventry
from 1851 to his premature death, aged 46, in 1854.Contents1 Banking career 2 Manufacturing 3 Political career 4 Personal life 5 ReferencesBanking career[edit] Geach was born in St Austell, Cornwall,[1] and through family connections in Penryn secured a junior position at the Bank of England.[2] A diligent employee, he was selected to establish a branch of the bank in Birmingham
Birmingham
in 1826
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Thomas Brassey
Thomas Brassey
Thomas Brassey
(7 November 1805 – 8 December 1870) was an English civil engineering contractor and manufacturer of building materials who was responsible for building much of the world's railways in the 19th century. By 1847, he had built about one-third of the railways in Britain, and by time of his death in 1870 he had built one in every twenty miles of railway in the world. This included three-quarters of the lines in France, major lines in many other European countries and in Canada, Australia, South America and India. He also built the structures associated with those railways, including docks, bridges, viaducts, stations, tunnels and drainage works. As well as railway engineering, Brassey was active in the development of steamships, mines, locomotive factories, marine telegraphy, and water supply and sewage systems
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