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Buddhist
Buddhism
Buddhism
(/ˈbʊdɪzəm, ˈbuː-/)[1][2] is a religion[3][4] and dharma that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism
Buddhism
originated in Ancient India
India
sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, from where it spread through much of Asia, whereafter it declined in India
India
during the Middle Ages. Two major extant branches of Buddhism
Buddhism
are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada
Theravada
(Pali: "The School of the Elders") and Mahayana
Mahayana
(Sanskrit: "The Great Vehicle")
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Tokyo National Museum
The Tokyo
Tokyo
National Museum
Museum
(東京国立博物館, Tōkyō Kokuritsu Hakubutsukan), or TNM, established in 1872, is the oldest Japanese national museum,[2] the largest art museum in Japan
Japan
and one of the largest art museums in the world. The museum collects, houses, and preserves a comprehensive collection of art works and archaeological objects of Asia, focusing on Japan. The museum holds over 110,000 objects, which includes 87 Japanese National Treasure holdings and 610 Important Cultural Property holdings (as of July 2005). The museum also conducts research and organizes educational events related to its collection. The museum is located inside Ueno Park
Ueno Park
in Taitō, Tokyo
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Dharma
Dharma
Dharma
(/ˈdɑːrmə/;[8] Sanskrit: धर्म, translit. dharma, pronounced [dʱəɾmə] ( listen); Pali: धम्म, translit. dhamma, translit
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Standing Buddha
The Standing Buddha
Standing Buddha
of the Tokyo National Museum
Tokyo National Museum
is a remarkable example of Greco-Buddhist statuary. Comparable ones can be found in the Musee Guimet
Musee Guimet
in France, and in the National Museum, New Delhi besides various other museums of South Asia
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Bodhipakkhiyādhammā
In Buddhism, bodhipakkhiyā dhammā (Pali; variant spellings include bodhipakkhikā dhammā and bodhapakkhiyā dhammā;[1] Skt.: bodhipakṣa dharma) are qualities (dhammā) conducive or related to (pakkhiya) awakening (bodhi). In the Pali
Pali
commentaries, the term bodhipakkhiyā dhammā is used to refer to seven sets of such qualities regularly mentioned by the Buddha throughout the Pali
Pali
Canon
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Threefold Training
The Buddha
The Buddha
identified the threefold training (sikkhā)[1] as training in:higher virtue (adhisīla-sikkhā) higher mind (adhicitta-sikkhā) higher wisdom (adhipaññā-sikkhā)Contents1 In the Pali
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Middle Way
The Middle Way
Middle Way
or Middle Path (Pali: Majjhimāpaṭipadā; Sanskrit: Madhyamāpratipad[1][a]; Tibetan: དབུ་མའི་ལམ།, THL: Umélam; Chinese: 中道; Vietnamese: Trung đạo; Thai: มัชฌิมาปฏิปทา) is the term that Gautama Buddha used to describe the character of the Noble Eightfold Path
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Prajñā (Buddhism)
Prajñā (Sanskrit) or paññā (Pāli) "wisdom" is insight in the true nature of reality, namely primarily anicca (impermanence), dukkha (dissatisfaction or suffering), anattā (non-self) and śūnyatā (emptiness).Contents1 Etymology 2 Understanding in the Buddhist traditions2.1 Theravada
Theravada
Buddhism 2.2 Mahāyāna Buddhism3 See also 4 References 5 Sources5.1 Published sources 5.2 Web-sources6 External linksEtymology[edit] Prajñā is often translated as "wisdom", but is closer in meaning to "insight", "discriminating knowledge", or "intuitive apprehension".[1]jñā can be trans
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Impermanence
Impermanence, also called Anicca or Anitya,[1] is one of the essential doctrines and a part of three marks of existence in Buddhism.[2][3][4] The doctrine asserts that all of conditioned existence, without exception, is "transient, evanescent, inconstant".[2] All temporal things, whether material or mental, are compounded objects in a continuous change of condition, subject to decline and destruction.[2][5] The concept of impermanence is also found in various schools of Hinduism and Jainism.[6][7] Anicca or impermanence is understood in Buddhism
Buddhism
as the first of three marks of existence, the other two being dukkha (suffering, pain, unsatisfactoriness) and anatta (non-self, non-soul, no essence).[4][3][8] All physical and mental events, states Buddhism, come into being and dissolve.[9] Human life embodies this flux in the aging process, the cycle of repeated birth and death (Samsara), nothing lasts, and everything decays
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Karuṇā
Karuṇā
Karuṇā
(in both Sanskrit
Sanskrit
and Pali) is generally translated as compassion.[1] It is part of the spiritual path of both Buddhism
Buddhism
and Jainism.Contents1 Buddhism1.1 Theravada
Theravada
Buddhism 1.2 Mahayana
Mahayana
Buddhism2 Jainism 3 Miscellaneous 4 See also 5 Notes 6 Sources 7 External linksBuddhism[edit] Karuṇā
Karuṇā
is important in all schools of Buddhism. For Theravāda Buddhists, dwelling in karuṇā is a means for attaining a happy present life and heavenly rebirth
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Four Stages Of Enlightenment
The four stages of enlightenment in Theravada
Theravada
Buddhism
Buddhism
are the four progressive stages culminating in full enlightenment as an Arahant. These four stages are Sotapanna, Sakadagami, Anāgāmi, and Arahant. The Buddha referred to people who are at one of these four st
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Pāramitā
Pāramitā
Pāramitā
(Sanskrit, Pali) or pāramī (Pāli) is "perfection" or "completeness". While, technically, pāramī and pāramitā are both Pāli terms, Pali
Pali
literature makes far greater reference to pāramī.Contents1 Etymology 2 Theravāda Buddhism2.1 Canonical sources 2.2 Historicity 2.3 Traditional practice3 Mahāyāna Buddhism 4 Tibetan Buddhism 5 See also 6 References6.1 Citations 6.2 Works cited7 External linksEtymology[edit] Donald S. Lopez, Jr. describes the etymology of the term:The term pāramitā, commonly translated as "perfection," has two etymologies. The first derives it from the word parama, meaning "highest", "most distant", and hence "chief", "primary", "most excellent". Hence, the substantive can be rendered "excellence" or "perfection"
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Buddhavacana
Buddhavacana, from Pali
Pali
and Sanskrit, means "the Word of the Buddha". It refers to the works accepted within a tradition as being the teachings of the Buddha
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Mahayana Sutras
The Mahayana
Mahayana
sutras are a broad genre of Buddhist scriptures that various traditions of Mahayana
Mahayana
Buddhism
Buddhism
accept as canonical. They are largely preserved in the Chinese Buddhist canon, the Tibetan Buddhist canon, and in extant Sanskrit
Sanskrit
manuscripts
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Glossary Of Buddhism
Some Buddhist
Buddhist
terms and concepts lack direct translations into English that cover the breadth of the original term. Below are given a number of important Buddhist
Buddhist
terms, short definitions, and the languages in which they appear
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Refuge (Buddhism)
สรณะ, ที่พึ่ง ที่ระลึก RTGS: sarana, thi phueng thi raluekVietnamese Quy yGlossary of BuddhismBuddhists take refuge in the Three Jewels
Three Jewels
or Triple Gem (also known as the "Three Refuges"). The Three Jewels
Three Jewels
are:the Buddha, the fully enlightened one the Dharma, the teachings expounded by the Buddha the Sangha, the monastic order of Buddhism
Buddhism
that practice the DharmaRefuge is common to all major schools of Buddhism
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