HOME ListMoto.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Brooklyn Museum
The Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Museum is an art museum located in the New York City borough of Brooklyn. At 560,000 square feet (52,000 m2), the museum is New York City's third largest in physical size and holds an art collection with roughly 1.5 million works.[2] Located near the Prospect Heights, Crown Heights, Flatbush, and Park Slope neighborhoods of Brooklyn
Brooklyn
and founded in 1895, the Beaux-Arts building, designed by McKim, Mead and White, was planned to be the largest art museum in the world. The museum initially struggled to maintain its building and collection, only to be revitalized in the late 20th century, thanks to major renovations. Significant areas of the collection include antiquities, specifically their collection of Egyptian antiquities
Egyptian antiquities
spanning over 3,000 years
[...More...]

"Brooklyn Museum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Winslow Homer
Winslow Homer
Winslow Homer
(February 24, 1836 – September 29, 1910) was an American landscape painter and printmaker, best known for his marine subjects. He is considered one of the foremost painters in 19th-century America and a preeminent figure in American art. Largely self-taught, Homer began his career working as a commercial illustrator.[1] He subsequently took up oil painting and produced major studio works characterized by the weight and density he exploited from the medium. He also worked extensively in watercolor, creating a fluid and prolific oeuvre, primarily chronicling his working vacations.[2][3]Contents1 Early life 2 Homer's studio 3 Early landscapes and watercolors 4 England 5 Maine and maturity 6 Influence 7 U.S
[...More...]

"Winslow Homer" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lincoln Memorial
The Lincoln Memorial
Lincoln Memorial
is an American national monument built to honor the 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It is located on the western end of the National Mall
National Mall
in Washington, D.C., across from the Washington Monument. The architect was Henry Bacon; the designer of the primary statue – Abraham Lincoln, 1920 – was Daniel Chester French; the Lincoln statue was carved by the Piccirilli Brothers;[2] and the painter of the interior murals was Jules Guerin. Dedicated in 1922, it is one of several monuments built to honor an American president
[...More...]

"Lincoln Memorial" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

National Register Of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
(NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. The passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966 established the National Register and the process for adding properties to it. Of the more than one million properties on the National Register, 80,000 are listed individually
[...More...]

"National Register Of Historic Places" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

American Colonial Period
The Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
were a group of British colonies on the east coast of North America
North America
founded in the 17th and 18th centuries that declared independence in 1776 and formed the United States
United States
of America. The Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
had very similar political, constitutional, and legal systems and were dominated by Protestant English-speakers. They were part of Britain's possessions in the New World, which also included colonies in Canada and the Caribbean, as well as East and West Florida. In the 18th century, the British government operated its colonies under a policy of mercantilism, in which the central government administered its possessions for the economic benefit of the mother country
[...More...]

"American Colonial Period" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Japanese Art
Japanese art
Japanese art
covers a wide range of art styles and media, including ancient pottery, sculpture, ink painting and calligraphy on silk and paper, ukiyo-e paintings and woodblock prints, kirigami, origami, dorodango, and more recently manga—modern Japanese cartooning and comics—along with a myriad of other types of works of art. It has a long history, ranging from the beginnings of human habitation in Japan, sometime in the 10th millennium BC, to the present. Japan
Japan
has been subject to sudden invasions of new and strange ideas followed by long periods of minimal contact with the outside world. Over time the Japanese developed the ability to absorb, imitate, and finally assimilate those elements of foreign culture that complemented their aesthetic preferences. The earliest complex art in Japan
Japan
was produced in the 7th and 8th centuries in connection with Buddhism
[...More...]

"Japanese Art" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oceanic Art
Oceanic art
Oceanic art
or Oceanian art
Oceanian art
comprises the creative works made by the native people of the Pacific Islands
Pacific Islands
and Australia, including areas as far apart as Hawaii
Hawaii
and Easter Island. Specifically it comprises the works of the two groups of people who settled the area, though during two different periods. They would in time however, come to interact and together reach even more remote islands. The area is often broken down into four separate regions: Polynesia, Micronesia, Australasia, and Melanesia. The former two share a common ancestral culture of the Lapita, while the latter two comprise settlers of the first wave of people into the area. All of the regions in later times would be greatly affected by western influence and colonization
[...More...]

"Oceanic Art" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Brooklyn Academy Of Music
www.bam.org Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Academy of Music (BAM)U.S. National Register of Historic PlacesShow map of New York CityShow map of New YorkShow map of the USLocation 30 Lafayette Avenue Brooklyn, New York CityCoordinates Coordinates: 40°41′11″N 73°58′41″W / 40.68639°N 73.97806°W / 40.68639; -73.97806Architect Herts & TallantArchitectural style Renaissance Revival[2]NRHP reference # 06000251[1]Added to NRHP May 2, 2006The Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Academy of Music (BAM) is a performing arts venue in Brooklyn, New York City, known as a center for progressive and avant garde performance. It presented its first performance in 1861 and began operations in its present location in 1908. Today, BAM has a reputation as a leader in presenting "cutting edge" performance and has grown into an urban arts center which focuses on both international arts presentation and local community needs
[...More...]

"Brooklyn Academy Of Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Art Of Europe
The art of Europe
Europe
or Western art encompasses the history of visual art in Europe. European prehistoric art started as mobile rock, and cave painting art, and was characteristic of the period between the Paleolithic
Paleolithic
and the Iron Age.[1] Written histories of European art often begin with the art of the Ancient Middle East, and the Ancient Aegean civilizations, dating from the 3rd millennium BC. Parallel with these significant cultures, art of one form or another existed all over Europe, wherever there were people, leaving signs such as carvings, decorated artifacts and huge standing stones
[...More...]

"Art Of Europe" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Egyptian Antiquities
Egyptology
Egyptology
(from Egypt and Greek -λογία, -logia. Arabic: علم المصريات‎) is the study of ancient Egyptian history, language, literature, religion, architecture and art from the 5th millennium BC until the end of its native religious practices in the 4th century AD. A practitioner of the discipline is an "Egyptologist". In Europe, particularly on the Continent, Egyptology
Egyptology
is primarily regarded as being a philological discipline, while in North America it is often regarded as a branch of archaeology.Contents1 History1.1 First explorers 1.2 Graeco-Roman Period 1.3 Middle Ages2 Development of the field2.1 Muslim scholars 2.2 European explorers3 Modern Egyptology 4 Academic discipline 5 See also 6 Notes and references 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory First explorers The first explorers were the ancient Egyptians
Egyptians
themselves
[...More...]

"Egyptian Antiquities" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Classical Architecture
Classical architecture
Classical architecture
usually denotes architecture which is more or less consciously derived from the principles of Greek and Roman architecture of classical antiquity, or sometimes even more specifically, from the works of Vitruvius.[1][2] Different styles of classical architecture have arguably existed since the Carolingian Renaissance,[3] and prominently since the Italian Renaissance. Although classical styles of architecture can vary greatly, they can in general all be said to draw on a common "vocabulary" of decorative and constructive elements.[4][5][6] In much of the Western world, dif
[...More...]

"Classical Architecture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Architecture
Architecture
Architecture
is both the process and the product of planning, designing, and constructing buildings or any other structures.[3] Architectural works, in the material form of buildings, are often perceived as cultural symbols and as works of art. Historical civilizations are often identified with their surviving architectural achievements. The term architecture is also used metaphorically to refer to the design of organizations and other abstract concepts
[...More...]

"Architecture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Flatbush, Brooklyn
Flatbush is a neighborhood in the New York City
New York City
borough of Brooklyn. Founded in 1651 by Dutch colonists, the neighborhood, which consists of several subsections, had a population of 110,875 as of the 2010 United States
United States
Census. By the 2010s, the area was quickly gentrifying. Flatbush was a town prior to being incorporated into the City of Brooklyn, and its former border runs through the Brooklyn
Brooklyn
Botanic Garden. Generally, the township was larger than what is considered Flatbush today by the residents of Brooklyn
[...More...]

"Flatbush, Brooklyn" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

New York City Subway
October 27, 1904 (Original subway) July 3, 1868[6] (first elevated, rapid transit operation) October 9, 1863 (first railroad operation)[note 6]Operator(s) New York City
New York City
Transit Authority (NYCTA)Number of vehicles 6,418[7]Headway Peak hours: 2–5 minutes[8] Off-peak: 10–20 minutes[8]TechnicalSystem length 7005394289280000000♠245 miles (394 km)[9]      (route length) 691 mi (1,112 km)[9]      (track length, revenue) 850 mi (1,370 km)[10]      (track length, total)Track gauge 4 ft 8 1⁄2 in (1
[...More...]

"New York City Subway" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Norman Rockwell
Norman Percevel Rockwell (February 3, 1894 – November 8, 1978) was a 20th-century American author, painter and illustrator. His works have a broad popular appeal in the United States for their reflection of American culture. Rockwell is most famous for the cover illustrations of everyday life he created for The Saturday Evening Post
The Saturday Evening Post
magazine over nearly five decades.[1] Among the best-known of Rockwell's works are the Willie Gillis
Willie Gillis
series, Rosie the Riveter, The Problem We All Live With, Saying Grace, and the Four Freedoms
Four Freedoms
series. He also is noted for his 64-year relationship with the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), during which he produced covers for their publication Boys' Life, calendars, and other illustrations
[...More...]

"Norman Rockwell" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Borough (New York City)
New York City
New York City
encompasses five different county-level administrative divisions called boroughs: Manhattan, the Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn, and Staten Island. All boroughs are part of New York City, and each of the boroughs is coextensive with a respective county, the primary administrative subdivision within New York State. The Bronx
The Bronx
and Queens are concurrent with the counties of the same name, while Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Staten Island
Staten Island
correspond to New York, Kings, and Richmond Counties respectively. Boroughs have existed since the consolidation of the city in 1898, when the city and each borough assumed their current boundaries. However, the boroughs have not always been coextensive with their respective counties
[...More...]

"Borough (New York City)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.