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Book Of Sui
The Book of Sui (Suí Shū) is the official history of the Sui dynasty. It ranks among the official Twenty-Four Histories of imperial China. It was commissioned by Emperor Taizong of the Tang dynasty, and written by a team of prominent scholars, including Yan Shigu, Kong Yingda, and Zhangsun Wuji, with Wei Zheng
Wei Zheng
as the lead author
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Traditional Chinese Characters
Traditional Chinese characters
Chinese characters
(traditional Chinese: 正體字/繁體字; simplified Chinese: 正体字/繁体字; Pinyin: Zhèngtǐzì/Fántǐzì) are Chinese characters
Chinese characters
in any character set that does not contain newly created characters or character substitutions performed after 1946. They are most commonly the characters in the standardized character sets of Taiwan, of Hong Kong and Macau
Macau
or in the Kangxi Dictionary
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Li Mu
Li Mu
Li Mu
(died 229 BC) was a general of the Zhao state during the Warring States period of Chinese history. He was named by Chinese historians as one of the four greatest generals of the Warring States period, along with Bai Qi, Wang Jian and Lian Po. Contents1 Life 2 Legacy 3 In popular culture 4 References4.1 Citations 4.2 BibliographyLife[edit] Li Mu
Li Mu
assumed command of Zhao's overall security situation after the death of Zhao She and the exile of Lian Po, both renowned former generals of Zhao. He began his career in Yanmen Commandery
Yanmen Commandery
on the northern frontier fighting the Xiongnu. He adopted an extremely defensive strategy, was accused of cowardice and replaced by a more aggressive general who was defeated every time he attacked the Xiongnu. Li Mu
Li Mu
was recalled and given a much larger army. He concealed his troops and played the coward
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Fang Xuanling
Fang Qiao (579–648), courtesy name Xuanling, better known as Fang Xuanling,[a] posthumously known as Duke Wenzhao of Liang, was a Chinese statesman and writer who served as a chancellor under Emperor Taizong in the early Tang dynasty. He was the lead editor of the historical record Book of Jin (covering the history of the Jin dynasty (265–420)) and one of the most celebrated Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
chancellors. He and his colleague, Du Ruhui, were often described as role models for chancellors in imperial China.Contents1 During the Sui dynasty 2 During Emperor Gaozu's reign 3 During Emperor Taizong's reign 4 Notes 5 ReferencesDuring the Sui dynasty[edit] Fang Xuanling
Fang Xuanling
was born in 579, shortly before the founding of the Sui dynasty in 581, during Sui's predecessor state, Northern Zhou
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Chen Shou
Chen Shou
Chen Shou
(233–297),[1] courtesy name Chengzuo, was an official and writer who lived in the Three Kingdoms
Three Kingdoms
period and Jin dynasty. He started his career as an official in the state of Shu during the Three Kingdoms era but was demoted and sent out of the capital for his refusal to fawn on Huang Hao, an influential court eunuch in Shu in its twilight years. After the fall of Shu in 263, Chen Shou's career entered a period of stagnation before Zhang Hua recommended him to serve in the Jin government
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Fan Ye (historian)
Fan Ye (398–445 or 446[1]), courtesy name Weizong (蔚宗), was a Chinese historian and politician of the Liu Song dynasty
Liu Song dynasty
during the Southern and Northern dynasties
Southern and Northern dynasties
period. He was the compiler of the historical text Book of the Later Han. The son of Fan Tai (范泰), Fan Ye was born in present-day Shaoxing, Zhejiang, but his ancestral home was in Nanyang, Henan. References[edit]Tan, Jiajian, "Hou Hanshu" ("Book of Later Han"). Encyclopedia of China (Chinese Literature Edition), 1st ed.^ Hill gives his death date as 446. He says that in January 446 he was awaiting execution for plotting against Emperor Wen of Liu Song
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Sima Qian
Sima Qian
Sima Qian
(/ˈsiːmɑː ˈtʃɪən/;[1] Chinese: 司馬遷; Wade–Giles: Ssu-ma Ch'ien /ˈsuːmɑː ˈtʃɪən/),[2] was a Chinese historian of the early Han dynasty
Han dynasty
(206 BC – AD 220)
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Wang Shichong
Wang Shichong
Wang Shichong
(王世充) (died 621), courtesy name Xingman (行滿), was a general of the Chinese Sui Dynasty
Dynasty
who deposed Sui's last emperor Yang Tong
Yang Tong
and briefly ruled as the emperor of a succeeding state of Zheng. He first became prominent during the reign of Emperor Yang of Sui as one of the few Sui generals having success against rebel generals, and during Yang Tong's brief reign, he was able to defeat the rebel general Li Mi and seize Li Mi's territory. After becoming emperor, however, he was unable to withstand military pressure from Tang Dynasty
Dynasty
forces, forcing him to seek aid from Dou Jiande the Prince of Xia
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Li Mi (Sui Dynasty)
Li Mi (Chinese: 李密; 582–619), courtesy name Xuansui (玄邃), pseudonym Liu Zhiyuan (劉智遠), was the leader of a rebel movement against the rule of the Chinese Sui dynasty. He initially was the strategist of the Sui general Yang Xuangan, who rebelled against Emperor Yang of Sui
Emperor Yang of Sui
in 613 but failed, and Li subsequently led a rebellion against Emperor Yang in his own right in 617. He gained so much following that there was widespread expectation that he soon would be able to prevail over Sui forces and establish a new dynasty—so much so that even other key rebel leaders, including Dou Jiande, Meng Haigong (孟海公), Xu Yuanlang, and Zhu Can, were urging him to take imperial title. Even Li Yuan (soon to become the founder of the Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
as Emperor Gaozu) was writing him in supplicating terms that implicitly supported his imperial claim
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Li Zixiong
Waise Lee Chi-hung (born 19 December 1959) is a Hong Kong film and television actor best known for playing the roles of villains and antagonists in various films.Contents1 Biography 2 Personal life 3 Filmography 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Lee graduated from TVB's Artist Training Academy in 1982 and was from the same batch as Tony Leung Chiu-Wai
Tony Leung Chiu-Wai
and Francis Ng. He started acting in Hong Kong films in the 1980s and became famous for his role as the antagonist Tam Shing in John Woo's 1986 film A Better Tomorrow. Since then Lee has made appearances in several films, including A Chinese Ghost Story II (1990), To Be Number One (1991), Powerful Four (1992)
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Lu Sidao
Lu Sidao (Chinese: 盧思道; 531–582) was a Chinese poet of the Sui dynasty.[1] He was from Fanyang Commandery which is now part of modern Beijing. References[edit]^ Chang, Kang-i Sun; Owen, Stephen (2010). The Cambridge History of Chinese Literature. Cambridge University Press. p. 282. ISBN 0521855586. This article about a poet from China is a stub
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Yang Shuang
Yang Shuang (born 24 May 1985 Henan) is a Chinese female volleyball player. She was part of the China
China
women's national volleyball team. She participated at the 2003 FIVB Volleyball Girls' U18 World Championship,[1] and 2004 FIVB World Grand Prix. On club level she played for Henan, in 2004.[2] References[edit]^ "Scorers". www.fivb.org. Retrieved 2018-02-23.  ^ "Team Rosters". www.fivb.org. Retrieved 2018-02-23. External links[edit]Player profile, FIVBThis biographical article relating to a People's Republic of China volleyball figure is a stub
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Yang Jing
Yang Jing (Chinese: 杨晶; pinyin: Yáng Jīng; born December 1953) is a former Chinese politician of Mongol heritage. He previously served as State Councilor
State Councilor
and Secretary-General of the State Council,[1] and the President of the Chinese Academy of Governance.[2] Prior to his ascendance to leading roles at the State Council, he served as the Director of the State Ethnic Affairs Commission (2008-2013), and the Chairman of the Inner Mongolia
Inner Mongolia
Autonomous Region (2003-2008). Yang was the highest-ranking non-Han official in the Chinese government.Contents1 Early career 2 Secretariat 3 After 19th Party Congress3.1 Investigation4 ReferencesEarly career[edit] Yang was born in Jungar Banner
Jungar Banner
in what was Ih Ju League of Inner Mongolia near the modern city of Ordos, and is of ethnic Mongol ancestry. He worked as a teenager in a farming equipment factory
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Simplified Chinese Characters
Simplified Chinese characters
Chinese characters
(简化字; jiǎnhuàzì)[1] are standardized Chinese characters
Chinese characters
prescribed in the Table of General Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
Characters for use in mainland China. Along with traditional Chinese characters, they are one of the two standard character sets of the contemporary Chinese written language. The government of the People's Republic of China
People's Republic of China
in mainland China has promoted them for use in printing since the 1950s and 1960s to encourage literacy.[2] They are officially used in the People's Republic of China
Republic of China
and Singapore. Traditional Chinese
Traditional Chinese
characters are currently used in Hong Kong, Macau, and the Republic of China
Republic of China
(Taiwan)
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Zheng Yi (author)
Scarlet Memorial: Tales of Cannibalism in Modern China is a book of reportage literature (baogao wenxue) by the Chinese novelist Zheng Yi (郑义; born 1947). Zheng and a group of writers under the joint pseudonym "T. P. Sym" translated and abridged it from the Chinese work 红色 纪念碑 Hongse jinianbei (Red monument; Taibei: Huashi, 1993)
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Liu Fang
Liu Fang
Liu Fang
(Chinese: t 劉芳, s 刘芳, p Liú Fāng; b. 1974) is one of the most prominent pipa players in the world. Described in the media as the "empress of pipa" (L'actualité), "divine mediator" (World), "the greatest ambassadress of the art of the pipa",[1] Liu Fang is known as “possessing virtuoso technique, grace and a unique empathy toward the music she plays – whether it is a traditional and folk tune or a modern Western composition” (All Music Guide). "She has an extraordinary focused, poised presence in her manner and her playing. In a lesser player this is just a trained formality; the body of material and techniques for her instruments is extremely highly developed, passed down through centuries
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